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#31 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2021 - 02:36 PM

The overall height of the battery is about 7-3/8 inches.

 

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The clearance height of the storage space under the seat and under the bed of the trailer box is a little over 6 inches.

 

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The underside of the trailer box has two ribs welded to it and with these ribs resting on the top of the frame, it will give me an added 1 inch of clearance.

 

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That is a total of only about 7 inches clearance so I need to lower the bottom of the storage area to gain another inch of clearance.

I'm going to show you a step by step process of forming this panel for the floor of the storage space under the seat and under the bed of the trailer box.

 

I figure out how wide and long the panel needs to be and cut that out.

Then I mark where I need to make the bends in it and cut 1 inch long slits in one end of it at those bend marks ( this doesn't really show up very well )

 

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I bend up 1 inch of the end of the panel where the slits are.

 

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And I bend two tabs back down flat.

 

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My home made sheet metal brake that I have will let me make a bend with an end tab pointing up but I can't make a bed with the end tab pointing down.

Also, I want to make two bends that will be 1 inch apart where the flat tabs are and they need to bend in opposite directions to form a " Z ".

The closest that I can make two opposite bends on my brake is 3 inches.   Luckily, my son has the equipment to do these kind of bends.

 

First I set the panel up in his big brake with the end tab pointing down.

 

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And I bend the panel up at 90 degrees.

 

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I do this to the other side of the panel so both sides are bent up and the end tabs are bent out.

 

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The panel is set up in another brake that will make close bends at opposite directions.

 

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And I make that opposite bend in it.

 

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Then I turn the panel around to make the bend on the other side.

 

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The panel now has the center area stepped down 1 inch.

 

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The two tabs that were flattened out earlier are now bent back over the end.

 

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I'm done with what I have to do with the panel here.

 

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The panel is set into the frame.

 

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I make up a pattern for the end panel out of cardboard.

 

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Then I cut this panel out of sheet metal and set it in place.

 

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As you can see, the battery slides back under the bed and has about 3/4 inch clearance between it and the underside of the bed.

All that is left is to weld this in place.  

I'll make up a piece of wood that fits onto the top of the battery that will keep it from bouncing up and touching the underside of the bed.

There will be another end panel that can be screwed in place in front of the battery to separate it from the storage area.

 

DSC03894.JPG


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#32 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2021 - 03:05 PM

Beautiful factory built piece made by a true craftsperson!


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#33 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2021 - 09:36 AM

I don't know what type of bearings these casters had originally when they were on a zero turn mower.

I wanted tapered roller bearings on this cart and I also wanted a grease seal on them.

The bearings and seals arrived in the mail so I can now put the rear axle together.

 

First thing was to machine a ring out of stainless steel for the grease seal to ride on.

The ring is slid down on the pivot shaft and I used Lock-tight to secure it in place.

The other un-machined piece of stainless is sitting on the bench.

 

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The seal fits down over this stainless ring.

 

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This is how the bottom bearing will sit down on top of the ring with the seal underneath it.

 

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I chuck up a piece of pipe on the outside and then I bore out one end for the bearing and the seal to fit into.   

These will be the pivot housings that will be welded onto the ends of the axle to hold the casters.

The outside diameter of the seal is just a little larger then the bearings.   

You can see that the bore is a little larger for the first 1/4 inch where the seal will fit into it.

 

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The pipe is turned around and gripped by the inside bore this time to turn out the other end.

This way both bores are in line with each other.

 

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There isn't much lip at the end of the bore for the bearing race to fit up against.

 

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Another piece of pipe is faced off on both ends to form a spacer between the upper and lower bearing races.

 

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These are placed inside the other pieces of pipe so there is now a wide lip for the end of the bearing races to fit up against.

These pipes are drilled and tapped thru in four places and hardened 5/16-18 set screws and threaded into both pieces of pipe.

These set screws will hold the spacer in place.

 

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The pivot housings are sand blasted and the outside ends of the set screws are welded over.

 

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The welds are ground down and a hole is drilled and tapped into each housing for a grease fitting to be installed.

 

DSC03907.JPG


 


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#34 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2021 - 08:26 PM

The rear axle is set up in the mill to cut a radius on the ends to fit the bearing housings.

 

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The axle and bearing housings are clamped together on the bench for welding.

 

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The welding is completed and the axle is ready to assemble the bearings and seals.

 

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Originally the pivot shafts on the casters had a washer and bolt that screwed down tight to the top of the shaft.

I screwed a piece 1/2 inch threaded rod into the ends of the pivot shafts and used Lock tight to secure them in place.  

Using a washer and 1/2 inch nut screwed down on top of the bearing will allow me to be able to adjust the tension on the bearings.

Then I can use a lock nut on top of the first nut to keep them secured.

 

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The casters are assembled to the axle and they are greased until it starts coming out from the top bearing.

 

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Then the caps are put on top of the bearing housings.

 

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It's time to prime the axle.

 

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These wheels would most likely have had bronze bushings pressed into the hubs but I decided to go with roller bearings instead.

 

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I had to machined spacers to fit between the wheel hub and the caster forks and I got one wheel assembled before I quit working in the garage today.

 

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#35 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 27, 2021 - 07:36 PM

Working on a piece of channel iron to go across the back end for the rear axle to fasten to.

I need to cut about 3/4 inch off one side and I'm doing that up on the mill and cutting 1/16 inch at each pass.

I'm sure glad that I have power feed on the mill table for jobs like this.

 

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This piece is welded between the frame rails.

This it the front support for the rear axle and the hole is already drilled and tapped for the center pivot bolt.

 

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The back support for the axle is made out of 3/8 thick steel and welded in place.

 

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The axle is sandwiched in between these two mounts.

 

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Here's how the wheels will be positioned when moving forward.

 

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And when moving backward.

 

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The width of the rear wheels is about the same as the width of the original tractor wheels.

 

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With the tractor now resting on it's rear wheels, the jack stand that was supporting the front of tractor can now be removed.

 

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Posted April 28, 2021 - 07:05 PM

The seat frame is welded to the top of the frame rails.

 

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The center is cut out of the two bars at the back of the frame for clearance to slide the battery in place.

 

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I welded in two 3/4 inch diameter rods going down to the frame of the floor to give extra support for the seat frame.

 

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I cut out two panels out of 1/16 inch thick sheet steel and primed one side.

 

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These are welded in place under the seat frame.

This gives me two narrow storage spaces for wrenches, rags, magazines, etc.

 

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There are two notches in the front edge of these panels for clearance for the brackets that fit around the seat frame and bolt to the underside of the seat cushion.

These allow the seat to be tilted forward and the clearance notches keep the seat cushion from moving sideways.

I only have two brackets holding the seat right now but when everything is finished, there will be four brackets bolted to the seat cushion.

 

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Here's how it looks with the seat cushion in place.

 

DSC03936.JPG


 


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Posted April 28, 2021 - 11:17 PM

The backrest on the school bus seat is really tall and about 4 inches thick so I'm only going to use the top portion of it for the backrest for the cart.

This it the part of the padding for the backrest that I'm going to use and the top portion of the metal frame that goes with it.

 

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I attached a piece of wood to the metal frame and this fits into the slot in the center of the padding.

I'll trim the cover back and it will be folded over and stapled to the wood strip on the bottom of the backrest.

 

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I'm going to use two pieces of 1-3/4" x 3/8" metal strip to support the backrest.

These will be welded to the metal inside the backrest and I want to make them so they will bolt onto the the back of the seat frame.

I've drilled two 3/8 inch clearance holes in each of the metal support strips.

Here I'm using a center punch to mark where the first hole will be in the short metal piece that will be the mount for the backrest.

 

DSC03943.JPG

 

 

Once that first hole is drilled and tapped in the mounting piece, then I bolt the support strip to it and drill a center point into the mounting piece thru the other hole in the support strip.

This is the easiest way that I have found to make sure that all the holes line up in both pieces.

 

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Then I drill and tap that hole in the short mounting piece.

 

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I cut the threaded part off some 3/8 bolts and screw these into the mounting pieces for threaded studs.

Then I weld them on the back side to lock the threaded studs in place.

 

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These mounting pieces are bolted onto the support strips and the top of the strips are then welded onto the metal part of the backrest.

This is set in place on the cart and the bottom ends of the support strips are clamped in place to the back of the seat frame.

 

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The short mounting pieces are then welded to the seat frame.

 

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They are set so there is a little clearance between the backrest support strips and the back of the seat cushion.

You can see here that instead of having the 4 inch thick backrest between the back of the seat cushion and the front of the trailer box, I now will only have the thin 3/8 inch thick support strips.

 

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Here is the height of the backrest support.

The bottom of the padded backrest will be a few inches above the top of the trailer box that will be mounted behind it.

With the backrest being bolted on, I can take it off, paint it and then put the padding and upholstery on it before I bolt it back onto the cart.

 

DSC03946.JPG


 


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#38 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2021 - 04:11 AM

Gonna be comfy!


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#39 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2021 - 07:03 PM

The frame for the backrest is painted.

 

DSC03949.JPG

 

 

This is set into the pocket in the padding.

I cut out a wider piece of 1/2 inch plywood that covers the bottom area of the padding except for a 1 inch wide strip along the front edge.

This piece of plywood is screwed to the wood strip on the metal backrest frame.

The 1 inch wide strip in front of the piece of plywood is filled with padding and the masking tape is holding it in place.

 

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I cut out a piece of aluminum that is the same size and shape of the wider piece of plywood.

 

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The upholstery is slid over the padding and fastened to the piece of plywood with staples.

The piece of aluminum is then fastened to the underside of the padding to hide the staples.

 

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The backrest is mounted back onto the cart.

 

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Edited by jdcrawler, April 30, 2021 - 08:24 AM.

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#40 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 30, 2021 - 04:19 AM

I like that Ray! Lets your back be cool while riding around


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#41 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 30, 2021 - 10:32 PM

This cart will have lever steering like a Zero Turn mower.    The only difference being that this cart has the caster wheels in the back instead of the front.

Making the steering control levers wouldn't be any problem at all but I wanted something that had the look of a factory made item so I went searching on the internet.

When I saw these levers on ebay, I knew they were just what I was looking for.

They are hydraulic control levers off and old Farmall tractor.

 

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I have cleaned them up and drilled and tapped holes in the transmission covers so this can be mounted on top of them.

 

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They are mounted so there is just enough clearance between them and the shift lever when it is in the forward position.

 

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This shows the location of the levers in relation to the driver.

 

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From these levers, I need to have control rods going forward to a jack shaft that will then have control rods going down towards the brakes.

The control levers operate with a rotating rod with the left lever attached to it that is mounted inside a rotating tube with the right lever attached to it.

For the jack shaft, I need to make a rotating shaft that is inside a rotating tube just like the levers.

 

I'll start by making the mounting housing that will hold the rotating tube.

This will be made out of a solid piece of 1-7/8 inch steel rod that will have a clearance hole drilled thru it for a 1 inch diameter tube.

 

DSC03962.JPG

 

 

I drill this clearance hole out to 1-1/8 inch drill size.    

As you can see, using this large of a drill is more then my lathe was designed for and I have to use a vice-grip to keep the drill chuck from rotating in the tail housing on the lathe.

 

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Once the clearance hole is drilled all the way thru, I then use a boring bar to machine a 1-5/16 inch diameter counter bore in each end for small roller bearings.

 

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A small hole is drilled and tapped into the side of the housing for a grease fitting.

Then a roller bearing is pressed into each end.

 

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The rotating tube will be made out of a piece of 1 inch diameter stainless rod.

This will have a smooth, rust resistant surface for the roller bearings to ride on.

This piece of stainless needs to have a clearance hole drilled thru it for a 5/8 inch diameter rod.

 

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The stainless piece is over 7 inches long so I have to get out some of my special long drills to drill the hole all the way thru it.

 

DSC03969.JPG


 


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#42 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 01, 2021 - 04:17 AM

I like those levers, would work good for aux. hydraulics on a GT.


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#43 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted May 02, 2021 - 11:59 AM

The ends of the 1 inch diameter tube are bored out and 5/8 ID bronze bushings are pressed into each end.

Putting the bushings into the ends of long tubes is another thing that I use my lathe for.

I put the bushings and the tube on the 5/8 rod and grip the rod very lightly in the chuck jaws so the rod can easily still slide in as the bushings are pressed in place.

Then I use the screw on the tail tail stock to press the bushings in place.

This keeps everything in a straight line much easier then trying to stand the tube up straight on the regular press.

I can do this on the lathe because bushings are a very light press fit.

 

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I figure out how far the tube will fit into the housing and then I drill a hole in the tube so the grease can get into the bushings.

 

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I assemble the parts and figure out how long I want the 5/8 shaft to be.

With this assembled, you can see that when I put grease in the housing, it will grease the the roller bearings in that housing and go on into the tube to grease the bushings.

 

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These are the levers and hubs that I machined that will fit onto the 1 inch tube.

 

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The hubs are pressed into the levers.

 

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Then they are brazed around the outside.

 

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The brazing is smoothed down and the levers are mounted onto the 1 inch stainless tube at 90 degrees to each other.

I drilled and tapped a hole in each of the hubs for a set screw.  

A corresponding hole is drilled 3/4th of the way into the wall of the stainless tube.

The set screws are tightened down into those holes to lock the levers onto the tube the same as if they were pinned together.

 

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The one lever is pressed onto the end of the 5/8 shaft and welded in place.

The other lever has a hub pressed into it.

 

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This shaft is slid into the stainless tube and the lever is fastened onto the other end of it at 90 degrees to the lever on the other end.

I have a small bolt and nut holding the lever in place for now but when everything is finished, there will be a split pin pressed thru the lever to lock it onto the shaft.

 

DSC03979.JPG


 


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#44 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted May 02, 2021 - 11:36 PM

It's a nice warm night so I went back out to the garage after church this evening and did some more work.

There is a big tractor show on June 24-26 and my daughter is coming down to go to it with me and I sure would like to have this ready to use by that time.

 

The double 90 degree lever jack-shaft assembly is mounted in place.  It is bolted to the steel frame that the rear shroud, the hood and sides panels attach too.

This is a welded square part of that frame and it is made out of 1 inch wide by 3/16 thick strap steel.

There is a square box like this on both sides of the transmission and they are strong enough that I hooked the chain to them to lift this tractor up and set it on the work table.

 

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View from the drivers seat.

 

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The two levers that are showing sticking out from the shroud are the levers that will have the control rods going down towards the brakes.

 

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These two levers have 10-24 screws under them that each lever rest on.   These are the stops that control the position of the aluminum control knobs and can be adjusted to keep the two knobs in line in their forward position.

 

DSC03991.JPG

 

 

Working on one of the control rods now.  I'm cutting threads on one end and using my lathe to make sure that the thread die is started straight on the rod.

I make a couple of turns by using the tail stock to put pressure on thread die while I rotate the lathe chuck by hand.

 

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Once I have a couple of threads cut on the rod, I clamp the rod in a vice and do the rest of the threads by hand.

The end of the rod it turned down a little ways to the inside diameter of the die.   This is so I can slide the thread die onto it to guarantee that die is on center to the rod when it starts cutting the threads.

 

DSC03990.JPG

 

 

The two top control rods are made up and mounted in place.   The springs on the levers are temporary to hold the them in the forward position.

Once all the control rods are in place, these springs will be removed because the springs on the brake bands will keep everything pulled into the forward position.

 

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#45 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted May 04, 2021 - 07:11 PM

The outside mounts for the lover jack shaft will also be attached to the framework for the hood and side covers.

The bottom part of this framework isn't attached to anything so I need to correct that.

These are the brackets that I made up for doing that.

 

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They bolt onto the axle housing on each side and the bottom part of the framework is welded to them.

 

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Boring out a piece for one of the two bearing brackets for the lower jack shaft.

 

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These have a bearing pressed into them and they are bolted to the framework on each side.

The 3/4 inch diameter jack shaft is supported by them on each side.

 

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I made up a short sleeve with a bearing pressed into each side and this is slid onto the jack shaft.

The blue tape is to keep it in position.

 

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Then I built this mounting bracket.

 

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This bracket bolts to the crossbar and the down bar on the frame work and holds the two bearings in place between the two outer bearings.

 

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A lever is welded to one end of the jack shaft and slid into place.

There is a collar with a set screw that screws down into a hole in the shaft to keep the shaft from sliding out.

 

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The other end of the jack shaft fits into one of the sleeve bearings.

The other lever is mounted on the shaft at 90 degrees to the lever on the outside of the shaft.

 

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