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#16 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2021 - 04:30 AM

That ought to work well!


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#17 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2021 - 06:47 PM

Was I ever surprised today ..... I came home from church this morning and there were two new tires sitting on my front porch.     FedEx had delivered them on Easter Sunday !

So I spent the afternoon working out in my garage.

 

The hole in the center of the wheel adapters is larger than the center boss that I had turned down on the tractor hubs so I I turned down a wood sleeve to fit between them.

 

DSC03689.JPG

 

 

I knew when I bought the wheel adapters that I would not be able to use the existing bolt holes to fasten them to the tractor hub.

You can see here that about a third of the hole is out past the edge of the casting.

 

DSC03690.JPG

 

 

I drilled and counter board five holes for 3/8 Allen head cap screws in the wheel adapters.

 

DSC03691.JPG

 

 

The adapter is set back on the hub and one hole is center punched.

That one hole is then drilled out to the size and threaded for a 3/8-16 thread.

 

DSC03693.JPG

 

 

The adapter is located on the hub with that one screw and the other four holes are center punched.

 

DSC03694.JPG

 

 

Those four holes are then drilled out to size but that are not threaded on the drill press.

 

DSC03695.JPG

 

 

The adapter is mounted back on the hub and the four holes are threaded by hand thru the holes in the adapter.

 

DSC03696.JPG

 

 

The wood sleeve is removed to be used on the other hub.

The adapter is mounted to the hub with Lock-tight put on the threads of the 3/8 cap screws.

Here is how it looks on the tractor axle.

 

DSC03697.JPG

 

 

And with the wheel and tire on.

 

DSC03699.JPG

 

 

The tractor will have a little wider stance with these wheels on it.

You can see that the tire is sitting about 2-1/2 inches farther out than the original wheel hub.

 

DSC03700.JPG


 


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#18 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 05, 2021 - 04:40 AM

Great way to mount those wheels.


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#19 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 05, 2021 - 06:42 PM

With the tires mounted, I can now start on making the frame.

To do that, I need to have the tractor sitting on it's tires on a level surface.

As I have mention before .. at 74 years old, kneeling down and bending over while working on something like this on the garage floor cramps up my lower back.

So to alleviate that condition, I take that platform that I use to get things up and out of the loft and set it up on stands.

This gives me a level surface to work off of that is raised up off the floor and much easier to work with.

 

DSC03701.JPG

 

 

Before I remove the frame from the back of this tractor, I use a tall jack stand to support the front of it.

I bent up a piece of strap metal that bolts to the front of the crankshaft and wraps around the edge of the jack stand so the front of the tractor can't accidentally slip off it.

 

DSC03702.JPG

 

 

With the front of the tractor supported in a level position by the jack stand, I can then remove the frame from the back of the tractor.

 

DSC03703.JPG

 

 

I'm using the side rails of this frame to make the new frame rails and they are mounted to the tractor about 6 inches lower then the original frame was.

The new frame is lowered in preparation of making the foot board in front of the seat.

 

DSC03704.JPG

 

 

The two new frame rails are bolted to holes that are already drilled and threaded in the lower front of the axle housings.

 

DSC03705.JPG

 

 

This vertical strap is welded to the inside of the frame rail and is bolted to one of the threaded holes where the original frame was fastened.

This shows how much lower the new frame is from the old frame.

 

DSC03706.JPG

 

 

There is a matching vertical strap on the other side also.  

These two straps secure the back of the axle housings so the two wheel tractor is now securely mounted to the frame rails with three bolts on each side.

 

I can't go any farther with the building the frame until the rear axle with the caster wheels is built so I'll start working on that tomorrow.

 

DSC03707.JPG


 


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#20 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 06, 2021 - 04:05 AM

I have the same issues with working on low things.  Nice table.


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#21 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 09, 2021 - 03:17 PM

Drilling a hole thru a piece of 2 inch square tube for the center pivot for the rear axle.

 

DSC03728.JPG

 

 

This is the steel sleeve and bushings that will allow the axle to pivot and it will pivot on the 7/8 diameter bolt.

 

DSC03729.JPG

 

 

The drilled hole in the axle is a little under size so I used an adjustable hand reamer to bring it out to the correct size.

 

DSC03730.JPG

 

 

Now the steel sleeve fits perfectly.

 

DSC03731.JPG

 

 

The sleeve is welded in three places on each side of the axle.

I reason I put the sleeve right up tight to one edge instead of in the center is so I could drill thru both the wall of the axle and the sleeve to install a grease fitting.

 

DSC03733.JPG

 

 

I have done enough work on the two caster yokes and the wheels to figure out that I need to get some parts to complete them.

 

The biggest thing that I liked when I was living up in Traverse City, Michigan, was that there was a steel supply and several industrial supply stores including a Granger supply.

So whenever I needed anything, I could just drive into town and someone would most likely have what I needed in stock.

Madison, Indiana, where I live now, is a beautiful little town but it doesn't have anything more then a Walmart, a Lowe's and a TSC.

 

I need some 2 inch wide by 3/8 inch thick flat steel to extend the arms on the caster yokes and I need some 3/4 ID x 1 inch OD needle bearings for the wheels and two 3/4 x 6 inch hardened shoulder bolts for the axles for those wheels.

Obviously, no place in Madison is going to have any of those items so I have to order them on line.

I am far enough along though so I have a good idea of just how high off the work table the rear axle will need to be so I can go ahead and start working on the rear frame while I'm waiting for parts to get here.

 

The first thing is to figure out where I want the seat to go.

 

DSC03735.JPG

 

 

With that figured out, I weld in the two vertical pieces of angle iron for the supports for the front of the seat frame.

I also added a little bit to the ends of the two frame rails that are angled up.

 

DSC03736.JPG

 

 

I'm using a piece of 2 inch by 5 inch steel channel for the main frame rail and it is clamped in place and leveled up, ready for welding.

 

DSC03737.JPG

 

 

The frame rail on the other side is clamped in place.

 

DSC03739.JPG

 

 

And I made sure they are square and level with each other before I weld them in place.

 

DSC03741.JPG


 


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Posted April 09, 2021 - 04:22 PM

I have issues with finding the steel I want to use also. Hate TSC and such as they price gouge a bunch.


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#23 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 09, 2021 - 09:24 PM

I have issues with finding the steel I want to use also. Hate TSC and such as they price gouge a bunch.

They are expensive.    I find that I can buy steel off the internet a lot cheaper even with the shipping cost.


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#24 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2021 - 04:37 PM

I've got an old piece of steel grating that I'm going to use for the floor.

This was a 3 by 4 foot piece and I have already cut it in half.

Here I'm getting ready to cut out two corner areas for the tires.

 

DSC03758.JPG

 

 

With the two corners cut out, it's time to check the fit.

 

DSC03759.JPG

 

 

Angle iron is welded around the edges to finish it off.

It is going to be hard to paint the underside of this floor once it is installed so I primed and painted it before I fasten it to the tractor.

 

DSC03760.JPG

 

 

I also painted the inside of the two frame rails.

 

DSC03761.JPG

 

 

The floor section is then welded in place.

 

DSC03764.JPG

 

DSC03763.JPG

 

 

This isn't as much floor area as I had on the Ridemaster cart but it will do fine for running around the tractor shows.

 

DSC03762.JPG

 

 

I have this old continental tire cover from back in the 50's.

I'm going to use it to make fenders and inside shields that will cover the back 1/4 of the tires so they don't rub on my shoes and pants leg.

 

DSC03769.JPG

 

 

The frame for the seat is welded in place.

 

DSC03765.JPG

 

 

This seat frame is for the bottom section of a school bus seat.

 

DSC03767.JPG
 


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#25 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2021 - 05:44 PM

The swivel caster yokes that I'm going to use are the correct length but they are an inch to wide for the 6 inch long shoulder axle bolts that I have.

I need to make them narrower so the first thing to do was to cut them apart.

 

DSC03770.JPG

 

 

I made up a spacer tube the correct length and bolted the two arms together.

Then I welded them back onto the pivot mount.

I also welded a nut on one side that the shoulder bolt screws into and gets locked in place.

 

DSC03773.JPG

 

 

Both casters are done.

 

DSC03774.JPG

 

 

This gives you an idea of how they will look with the wheels mounted.

 

DSC03785.JPG

 

 

I'm still waiting on the bearings for these so I'll work on something else for awhile.

This tractor has band brakes on both sides and the operating lever is on the back side of the brake drum and pulls backward to operate the brakes.

 

DSC03775.JPG

 

 

I don't want to have the operating linkage for the brakes in the area where my feet will be so I need to see if I can move the lever to the front side of the brake drum.

The mounting bolt for the brake assembly on the other side came off easily but this side doesn't want to move.

I ended up having to heat the housing up and it still took a long punch and a big hammer to get it out.

 

DSC03778.JPG

 

 

You can see here that the mounting hole in the back is 5/8 inch diameter and the mounting hole in the front is only 3/8 inch diameter.

I figure that I can take the brake assembly from the other side and move it over to this side but I have to drill the front mounting hole out to 5/8 inch diameter.

 

DSC03779.JPG

 

 

I'll start with this counter bore drill.    It has a 3/8 inch pilot that will follow the 3/8 inch hole and keep the larger diameter cutting straight thru the housing.

This brings the front hole size out so it is only about .040 smaller then finish size.

 

DSC03780.JPG

 

 

Then I'll use this 5/8 inch diameter reamer with the extension and a drill that has a level bubble on the top of it.

This makes it easier to ream the hole level and square with the housing.

 

DSC03781.JPG

 

 

The brake assembly from the other side is now mounted on this side.

I drilled a 3/8 inch clearance hole thru a short 5/8 inch bolt and used it for the spacer for the rear hole.

The 3/8 inch bolt that fastened the front of the brake assembly in place had a 1/4 inch wide spacer between the bracket and the housing.

I cut the face of the 5/8 inch bolt head down to 1/4 inch thick so that bracket is still the correct distance out from the housing.

 

The operating lever for the brake is now in the front where there is plenty of room for the operating linkage.

 

DSC03784.JPG


 


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#26 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 16, 2021 - 08:09 PM

The clutch on this garden tractor was operated by hand by pushing a lever forward to lock the clutch in drive position.

Pulling the lever back opened the clutch.

I want to have a foot pedal to operate the clutch but that will only pull the clutch arm back so I need a  strong spring to pull the clutch arm forward to engage the clutch and keep it engaged.

 

This was the same problem that I had with converting the clutch on the John Deere crawler from hand operation to a foot pedal.

Just putting a spring on the clutch arm won't work because when the clutch pedal is pressed down, it is holding back all the pressure of the spring and my foot and leg would get tired really quick.

To solve that problem on the crawler, I made up a rotating bracket with a lever that rotated around until the spring was held back at almost top dead center of the rotation.

This then took almost all of the spring pressure off the foot pedal when the clutch was open.

 

I am going to make that same type of setup for this tractor.

First, I drill two mounting holes in a piece of angle iron and drill a clearance hole between them.

 

DSC03788.JPG

 

 

Then I machine out a piece of steel tube for the bearings to fit into.

 

DSC03787.JPG

 

 

This steel ring is welded to the angle iron and the bearings are pressed into it.

This assemble will bolt onto the side of the tractor behind the clutch arm.

 

DSC03789.JPG

 

 

Next I make up a little " U " shaped bracket that is drilled and tapped for a 5/16 shoulder bolt.

 

DSC03792.JPG

 

 

This piece is welded to a collar on one end of a 3/4 inch diameter steel shaft.

 

DSC03795.JPG

 

 

A 7/16 inch diameter reamer is used to finish the hole in this small steel bar.

A brass bushing with a 5/16 ID will be pressed into this hole.

 

DSC03794.JPG

 

 

The steel bar is attached to the bracket and it is heated up and bent down around the steel shaft.

 

DSC03796.JPG

 

 

This is mounted onto the bearing bracket and I mark the steel bar fort where I need to drill the hole in it to hold the spring.

You can see here that the large clearance hole was needed in the piece of angle iron so that this shaft can be slid in or out of the bushings.

 

DSC03797.JPG

 

 

The pivot finished bracket is bolted onto the side of the tractor and the spring is attached to it.

I had to use both hands to rotate the vice grip down and pull the spring back.

With the spring pulled all the way back to almost top dead center, the pressure on the vice grip is so slight that I can hold it down with just the tip of my thumb.

 

DSC03799.JPG

 

 

When I release the vice grip, it is rotated back up almost 5 inches.

The clutch arm on the tractor only needs to move about 1-3/4 inches so there will be plenty of spring pressure left on it to lock in drive position in and hold it in place.

 

DSC03800.JPG


 


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Posted April 17, 2021 - 07:21 PM

The clutch operating lever is made up and slid onto the shaft of the spring lever.

Then I made up the clutch rod.

This is the position with the clutch open.

 

DSC03802.JPG

 

 

And with the clutch closed.

 

DSC03803.JPG

 

 

Another lever will be welded to this that the cable from the clutch pedal will connect too.

This  will eventually get a hole drilled thru it and a split pin pressed into it to lock this lever onto the 3/4 inch shaft.

I don't want to do that though until after the clutch pedal is made and the cable attached and I make sure that everything is working properly.

 

Scrounging thru my stuff, I found this bracket and and an old pedal off ... who knows what ?

 

DSC03804.JPG

 

 

I'm going to use a 5/8 inch diameter shoulder bolt for the pivot pin  so I reamed the holes in the bracket out to 5/8.

 

DSC03808.JPG

 

 

Then I turned a 1/2-13 nut down part way.

 

DSC03807.JPG

 

 

This nut is then pressed into one of the holes in the bracket.

 

DSC03809.JPG

 

 

Now the shoulder bolt can be screwed into the bracket for the pivot pin.

I had to use the press to push the old pin out of the pedal.

That will get reamed out a little and a brass bushing will be installed in it.

 

DSC03811.JPG

 

 

I have some solid 13/16 inch diameter bearing bronze and I have drilled and reamed a piece of it out to fit the shoulder bolt.

 

DSC03813.JPG

 

 

The bronze bushing is pressed into the pedal and the pedal is assembled to the bracket.

 

DSC03815.JPG

 

 

Here is where it will be located on the floor of the cart.

 

DSC03816.JPG


 


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Posted April 18, 2021 - 04:09 PM

Was able to work on it a little bit after church this morning.

This is the start of the bracket to hold the cable.

 

DSC03817.JPG

 

 

After drilling some mounting holes in it and bending up the tab on the end, I then welded a short piece of small diameter pipe to it.

The pipe is threaded on the inside to accept the adjuster on the cable housing.

Here I'm milling a slot into it so the cable itself can be slipped into it and then the adjuster can be screwed into place.

 

DSC03818.JPG

 

 

The cable bracket is mounted to the side of the tractor, behind the brake band and with that in place, I can figure out how long the lower lever needs to be.

The lever is made up and welded to the pivot shaft and then this is drilled thru and a bolt is put thru to lock it onto the shaft.

 

With the cable connected, this is the position with the clutch open.

 

DSC03819.JPG

 

 

And this is the position with the clutch closed.

 

DSC03820.JPG


 


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#29 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted April 20, 2021 - 05:41 PM

I made up a 1/8 inch thick steel mounting plate for attaching the clutch pedal bracket to the floor.

 

DSC03823.JPG

 

 

The plate is primed and fastened down on top of the floor.

 

DSC03824.JPG

 

 

Then the clutch pedal bracket is bolted to it from underneath, sandwiching the floor grid metal between the steel plate and the pedal mounting bracket.

 

DSC03826.JPG

 

 

The cable is attached to the lever and this shows the good amount of ground clearance there is to the end of the cable lever.

 

DSC03832.JPG

 

 

A closer view of showing the mount that bolts to the underside of the floor for holding the cable housing.

 

DSC03827.JPG

 

 

A view of the cable running from the clutch linkage on the right side of the engine and down to the pedal on the left side.

 

DSC03835.JPG

 

 

Looking at it from the side, you can see that the cable stays tucked in close to the tractor.

 

..... You may notice that this linkage looks different from the last photo that I had showed you.    When I was making up the lever to weld onto the clutch pedal, the amount of cable movement wasn't working out to what I had figured out that it should be.

Going back over everything, I realized that I had  switch the dimensions for the length of the top and bottom levers on the linkage on the side of the tractor.

The top lever was suppose to be the longer lever and I had made the bottom one the longest lever.

So I pulled that lever back off of the 3/4 shaft, flipped it end for end and put it back on the shaft.    Now everything works right.

 

DSC03836.JPG

 

 

In normal position, the clutch lever on the engine is in the forward position with the clutch engaged.

 

DSC03833.JPG

 

 

Pushing the pedal down pulls the clutch lever back and opens the clutch.  

When the pedal is released, the spring pulls the clutch lever back forward and engages the clutch.

 

DSC03834.JPG

 

 

 

While I sitting on the tractor and working the clutch pedal, I realized that the seat feels a little low.     So I checked the measurement of the top of the seat again and it is 15-1/2 inch .. just what the bus seat measured before I cut the frame apart.

Then is dawned on me that school bus seats are built for school children.     Granted, at 5 foot 5 inch, I'm not considered a tall person by any means but I am still taller than most of the kids that ride school buses.

So .. I think I'm going to have to raise that seat a little.

 

DSC03831.JPG


 


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Posted April 22, 2021 - 06:27 PM

I made a slight cosmetic change to the plate under the clutch pedal.

I decided to weld in the top of the bolts in the corners that fasten it to the floor grid.

This gives the plate a much smoother look.

 

DSC03867.JPG

 

 

I welded two sections of rectangle steel tubing to the tractor frame to raise the seat up some.

These are long enough so they extend out past the end of the frame where the rear axle will be fastened on.

The section of trailer bed that will be attached behind the seat will rest on these longer rails.

 

DSC03870.JPG

 

DSC03864.JPG

 

 

This cutout area under the seat will be boxed in for storage.

The battery will also be located under the bed just behind this storage area.

 

DSC03869.JPG

 

 

The area in front going down to the floor is closed in with a piece of metal.

 

DSC03868.JPG

 

 

The back ends of the tubes are also closed in.

 

DSC03865.JPG

 

 

This raises the height of the seat up to about 17-1/2 inch and it feels much more comfortable now.

 

DSC03871.JPG


 


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