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1915 model-T streetrod


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#31 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2020 - 10:17 AM

If the 340 balancer and the Chevy balancer were not the same diameter, the Chevy timing tab will only be accurate at the TDC mark.  ...You may be better off making a tab for TDC and making degree marks on the 340 balancer.

They are both 7-1/4 inch diameter.


Edited by jdcrawler, August 09, 2020 - 10:26 AM.

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#32 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2020 - 02:58 PM

........ A little information for those of you that like this sort of thing .................

 

 

The early Chrysler, Dodge and DeSoto  Hemi engines were popular for hot rodders and drag racers back in the 50's - 60's and into the 70's.

The stock Hemi had more horsepower then the other V-8 engines with equivalent cubic inches and their huge valve covers just makes them look massive.

Because of their design, it was also easier to get more horsepower out of them then the normal overhead valve design engines.

Because they were so popular, you could get most anything to hop them up and to dress them up.

 

A couple of drawbacks with the engines was that their starters were on the left side of the block, as shone in this photo of a stock Hemi from a Chrysler 300.

In this location, the starter would be in the way of the steering box when putting these engines into an older car.

 

011.jpg

 

 

And the oil filter stuck way out from the block on the right side.

 

012.jpg

 

 

You could get ( and still can get ) adapters to mount the oil filter along side the block or pointing straight down.

 

013.PNG    014.jpg

 

 

Most hot rodders and drag racers did not use the stock Chrysler automatic transmission so adapters were available to  use just about any other transmission with them.

This was a very popular adapter to bolt the Hemi up to the 32 to 48 Ford standard transmission.

This adapter moved the original Chrysler starter over to the right side.

 

016.png

 

 

Here is an adapter to bolt a Chevy automatic transmission to the Hemi and it also mounts the original Chrysler starter over on the right side.

 

015.jpg

 

 

 

When I first thought of building this car, I wanted it to look like the rods that were built back in the 50's and 60's.

So, naturally, I wanted an early Hemi.

......... ( I'm glad I bought mine when I did because I sure couldn't afford to buy one now at today's prices. ... actually, I bought three of them. ) ...........

 

As you can see on my car, there is no room for a starter on the left side of the engine.

 

DSC02510.JPG

 

 

I had already made my own transmission adapter to bolt a Chevy automatic transmission on my engine.

Instead of using the old original Chrysler starter, I wanted to use a more modern Chevy starter that I would still be able to get parts for it 20 years later.

 

So I built my own starter adapter to put the Chevy starter on the right side of the block.

 

DSC02511.JPG

 

 

Back in the 50's and 60's, power steering wasn't even a consideration when those guys were building their rods so ( as far as I know ) no one sold an adapter to move the location of the power steering pump.

If you look back at the photo of the stock Chrysler 300 hemi, you will see that the power steering pump was mounted up on the left side next to the water pump.

 

I wanted power steering on my car but I didn't want the pump in such a visible location.

So, I made a adapter to mount the power steering pump down low on the right side and put the alternator up where the pump use to be.

 

DSC02514.JPG


Edited by jdcrawler, August 09, 2020 - 03:25 PM.

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#33 Mark 149 J. OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2020 - 10:56 PM

Lots of interesting information about the early hemi's.  You and my younger brother would have a lot to talk about.  He has a lot of the old hemi's piled up in his shop.  He's big into rat rods.  He has a 32 Chevy coup with a 292 straight six.  He's modified it a lot.  He's currently at Bonneville Speed Week in Utah.  He drives the 32 down there every year (1200 miles round trip) .  He doesn't run it at Bonneville but he enjoys seeing all of the cars and friends that he's made. 

Keep up the good work!

Here is a picture of him with his car.

13047785_963503743768766_213137831980735


Edited by Mark 149 J., August 10, 2020 - 02:32 PM.

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#34 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2020 - 12:33 PM

.... Continuing for your entertainment with information of adapting parts from other engines to fit the early Hemi engines. ....

 

 

It's common for parts from one size engine to bolt right on another size engine that is made by the same manufacture.

A good example is all the different parts that will interchange between the Chevy 265 - 283 - 327 - 350 and 400 engines all thru the many years of production.

However, you would not expect to be able to use parts from one manufacture on another manufactures engine ... especially the water pump.

A water pump is a unique part that is manufactured for a particular manufacture and sometimes for only one particular engine.

 

Over the years of production, Chrysler had manufactured different styles of water pump housings for their Hemi engines.

Starting with the 331 with a cast iron combination of water pump housing and timing chain cover.

 

022.jpg

 

 

This early Hemi did not have water outlet ports in the cylinder heads.

 

023.jpg

 

 

Then they put water outlet ports in the heads and made a cast iron water pump with a crossover pipe cast into the top of it to bolt to the heads.

Engines with this style pump housing used a stamped steel timing chain cover behind it.

 

010.jpg

 

 

They also cast the pump housing and crossover housing as individual units ( as shone on this engine )

 

019.jpg

 

 

They also manufactured different sizes of water pumps for the two piece housings over the years.

 

021.jpg

 

 

 

These original style water pumps are still available but no parts store is likely to have one in stock and most places aren't even able to order one.

You can order them from places like Summit and Jegs but they are really expensive.

 

Back when these Hemis were still a commonly used engine, someone figured out that a Chevy water pump could easily be adapted to them by making a pair of adapter blocks.

 

008.jpg

 

 

With the Chevy pump, you could use the Chrysler crossover thermostat housing.

The crossover housings came with the thermostat housing on the top center ( as shown in the photo ) .. or on the top left side of the engine .. or on the front, a little off center to the left.

 

024.jpg   

 

 

Or make up your own crossover pipe and thermostat housing.

 

025.jpg

 

 

Instead of buying a water pump adapter kit, I went ahead and made up my own blocks out of aluminum.

I also made up my own crossover tube and thermostat housing.

 

DSC02512.JPG

 

 

That chrome tube in the photo with the cap on it that is sticking out at angle on the left side is my oil fill tube.

The oil fill tube on the original engine was in the front of the valley cover pan and stuck up in front of the carburetor.

My oil fill tube is bolted to the side of the timing chain cover where the fuel pump fit.

The cap is lifted off to add oil to the engine.

 

DSC02513.JPG


Edited by jdcrawler, August 10, 2020 - 12:45 PM.

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#35 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2020 - 09:54 AM

The Chrysler originally had a duel point distributor.

It worked well but I would prefer to have electronic ignition.

Of coarse several types of distributors and even magnetos were, and still are available.

Or .. you could adapt a stock electronic distributor from a newer Chrysler engine to it.   

 

The base of the distributor from a 383 / 440 engine fits perfectly into the Hemi block but the shaft on the newer distributor is about 5/16 inch short.

Here you can see that the tab on the distributor shaft doesn't quite fit down into the slot in the drive gear.

 

007.jpg

 

 

There is a guy that makes an adapter to extend the shaft on the newer Chrysler distributors.

Here he shows the original early Hemi on the left and a stock newer distributor in the center with his extension kit on the distributor on the right.

 

018.jpg

 

 

With his extension, you have to cut about an inch off the shaft of the newer distributor.

Then slide his extension up on the shaft until it is at the correct length and then drill and pin it in place,

Naturally, I decided to just make my own shaft extension.

Instead of cutting the locating tab off the end of the newer distributor shaft, I decided to keep it and just make a short piece to fit on the end of the shaft.

 

I have a junk Chrysler distributor so I cut about 5/8 inch off the end of it.

Then I clamped the tab of that piece in my mill and machined a slot about .100 deep into the end of it that is inline with the tab.

 

DSC02500.JPG

 

 

The tab on the newer distributor is almost 5/16 long so if I had milled that slot the full depth so it fit onto the end of the distributor, then there wouldn't be hardly any metal holding the tab onto that piece.

Once the slot was milled into the extension piece, then I cut some off the distributor tab so it fit into the slot in the extension.

 

DSC02501.JPG

 

 

A piece of steel rod is bored out so one end slides onto the newer distributor shaft.

The other end is bored out to where it is a press fit for the extension piece.

 

DSC02503.JPG

 

 

The extension piece is pressed into the sleeve.

 

DSC02505.JPG

 

 

Even though the sleeve and the extension piece are pressed together, I still drilled and put a small pin thru them to guarantee that they never come apart.

 

DSC02506.JPG

 

 

The extension is slid up over the distributor and it is drilled and pinned to the the distributor shaft.

 

DSC02508.JPG

 

 

Here is the finished distributor ready to go back into my engine.

 

DSC02509.JPG

 

 


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#36 Mark 149 J. OFFLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2020 - 11:20 AM

Nice fix!

Looks like you're using a stock electronic distributor.  What is the gold  part that you have attached where the cap would go?


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#37 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2020 - 01:22 PM

Nice fix!

Looks like you're using a stock electronic distributor.  What is the gold  part that you have attached where the cap would go?

That is a brass sleeve that holds the top part of an old Grant Flamethrower distributor.

The regular Chrysler distributor cap is inside that brass sleeve and the plug wires will go up thru the holes in the side plates on the Flamethrower cap.

 

DSC02460.JPG    DSC02458.JPG


Edited by jdcrawler, August 11, 2020 - 01:23 PM.

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#38 jdcrawler ONLINE  

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Posted Yesterday, 08:18 AM

For the timing tab, I made up a bracket that will bolt to the lower part of the engine and then fastened a Chevy degree tab to it.

 

DSC02517.JPG

 

 

Here it is mounted on the Hemi.

 

DSC02518.JPG


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