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A few questions about my new-to-me Bolens 1220

bolens clutch differential

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#46 fildred13 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 31, 2020 - 04:29 PM

Got the tractor almost completely apart now (sans transmission - a project for a later time!)

I'm down to the drive shaft issue I've been posting about, which I hope will come apart once the chain vise grips show up.

Meanwhile, the very last sub assembly to get apart is the Steering Gear, part# 1713809. Pulling this off the cross shaft is taking a surprising amount of force, and I stopped as soon as I noticed it getting heavy because these parts are cast, so I didn't want to find out that, much like the drive hub, I should instead be banging with a wooden block. Anybody had any experience taking these off?

I'm including some pictures of my setup - curious if I'm just being too timid because I'm worried about breaking the part, or if there is something wrong with my setup. I don't see any set screws or anything, so assuming it can pull off in this direction (which it looks like it can), I assume it'll pull just fine. Would rather not find out I'm wrong by cracking a casting though!

2020-07-29 23.09.41.jpg 2020-07-29 23.09.48.jpg

Exciting to have disassembly all but complete. Ordered a boatload of hardware and a few replacement parts. Cleaning and painting starts this week, and reassembly is right around the corner!


Edited by fildred13, July 31, 2020 - 04:31 PM.

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#47 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 31, 2020 - 06:45 PM

Meanwhile, the very last sub assembly to get apart is the Steering Gear, part# 1713809. Pulling this off the cross shaft is taking a surprising amount of force, and I stopped as soon as I noticed it getting heavy because these parts are cast, so I didn't want to find out that, much like the drive hub, I should instead be banging with a wooden block. Anybody had any experience taking these off?

I'm including some pictures of my setup - curious if I'm just being too timid because I'm worried about breaking the part, or if there is something wrong with my setup. I don't see any set screws or anything, so assuming it can pull off in this direction (which it looks like it can), I assume it'll pull just fine. Would rather not find out I'm wrong by cracking a casting though!

 

The steering gear and arm can be a tight fit and seized / rusted to each other if they have never been apart before and the tractor has been exposed to the elements.  If you are sure the arm and gear moved on the shaft cleaning the shaft surface with a wire brush and then applying some lubricant may allow the shaft to continue to slip through them using the puller method - a bit of heat applied to the gear and arm where the shaft sits may also aid in the removal process.

 

If you check out post 76 in my 1053 thread you will see that the cross shaft can be removed with the steering gear and arm still in place on it by removing the bronze bushing where the shaft goes through it on the clutch side.

 

https://gardentracto...project/page-6 

 

This should give you enough side ways wiggle room to slip the shaft out of the main support and then the shaft can be placed in a press to remove the arm and gear which I find a bit easier.  On my first 1050 which had sat outside for several years I never did get the shaft to move (did not have a press at that time), on my second 1050 the shaft slid out of the gear and arm quite easily as someone had applied a layer of grease to them where the sit on the shaft and on the 1053 it took the press and some heat before the shaft moved.  As far as I know there should not be anything holding them in place on the  shaft once the cotter keys have been removed other than a bond of rust and gunge formed over 50 years of time.

 

Good luck.


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#48 Bruce Dorsi ONLINE  

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Posted July 31, 2020 - 07:46 PM

Have you tried clamping the flats of the clutch flange in the vice (with the shaft vertical ) and turning the shaft with a pipe wrench ??


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#49 Dave in NY ONLINE  

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Posted July 31, 2020 - 08:16 PM

Like 29Chev, I also had to use a press and heat to get one apart. I also got so frustrated with one that I hacksawed the shaft in two to get it out of the support. Not a big deal as I replaced the shaft anyway, it was severely worn on the ends where it rode in the bushings. Usually some heat and oil will help if they aren't rusted severely. The press will help immensely.


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#50 fildred13 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 01, 2020 - 07:41 PM

I did try putting the flats in a vise and turning the shaft with a pipe wrench. Even the vise couldn't get a good grip on the flats, which tells me a wrench REALLY would've been pointless to keep trying. If the chain vise grips don't work then I'll clean up the flats with a file and try fabricating a custom wrench. If even that doesn't work I'll go with the "pins" method, though I'll hold off until I have a suitable backup, or it absolutely needs to come apart.

The drive gear and friends aren't all that rusted. I've got a 3 ton arbor press so that SHOULD be sufficient. Just need to get it setup to allow such a long arbor through the anvil. In the meantime, kroil oil every day, and yeah I'll try my mapp torch if it's sticky. Don't have oxy yet, so that's my biggest guns at the moment!






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