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A few questions about my new-to-me Bolens 1220

bolens clutch differential

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#16 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 16, 2020 - 11:07 AM

If you check out post #77 on this thread that I did on my 1053 you can see what happens when steel against steel is allowed to continue and how it can damage the faces of the hub and pulley. 

https://gardentracto...turn to service

If you are putting new lining on the brake plate you may also wish to check the condition of the friction material on the belt pulley and make sure both facings are still stuck to the pulley as they can loose their bond with age.  I would also recommend that you check the condition of and perhaps replace the release bearing as they sometimes seize up - the release bearing runs any time the driveshaft runs and as a result may be getting worn or be partially seized if it is original.  Just suggestions that may save you having to repair the clutch again in the near future.

 

The paint should adhere to the idler pulleys as long as you get them clean without flaking off - at least that has been my experience.  The paint will however eventually be worn off where the idler pulleys come in contact with the belts as you can see in the picture with the belt tool.  The belt tool is handy if you need to change the PTO belts or the belt that drives the hydraulic pump - not a Bolens item but easily made and has saved my fingers from getting pinched a couple of times.


Edited by 29 Chev, July 16, 2020 - 11:09 AM.

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#17 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 16, 2020 - 11:36 AM

 

Having just spent the whole day taking apart the underside of the tractor for a good cleaning and repair, I fully appreciate that idler pulley tool. Might have to steal that one for myself! 
 

If you want more info on the belt tool check out post # 124 of this thread

https://gardentracto...cylinder/page-9


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#18 Dave in NY OFFLINE  

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Posted July 16, 2020 - 06:55 PM

[quote name="Bruce Dorsi" post="954738" timestamp="1594902689"]The self-aligning bearing in the front clutch support plate does have an eccentric inner race.  ...In other applications, there is an eccentric collar with set screw which fits over the inner race.  ...By turning the collar, the collar locks the inner race to the shaft.  ...The set screw holds the collar in that position.[/quote) That makes sense. I had never used one of that style bearing on anything other than these tube tractors. Perfectly understandable, now I know why they are made like that! Thanks for the information! I thought it might be just a small but insignificant flaw during the manufacturing process, but not anything that would affect the function.
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#19 fildred13 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 16, 2020 - 09:34 PM

Thanks for all the help guys, I really appreciate the experienced guidance.

I'm glad to hear it about the eccentric inner race of that bearing. I kind of assumed it had to be that way, because the tractor was running so well and I just couldn't figure how wear could ever have done that to a bearing. And it sure is welcome news, because the bearing is in great condition and running real smooth and quiet. A rare thing when disassembling old machines!

Thanks for the tips on other things to look for while I have it apart, I certainly will evaluate the rest of the assembly.

Actually, I'll evaluate pretty much all of every assembly, because today I was poking around and the more I took off, the more I saw I should take more off. At this point, I'm basically all the way there, so I'm taking it apart until all that's left is a transmission, frame, and an engine. Everything else is coming off and getting serviced/sanded/painted/replace/whatever else it needs. New hardware where needed, etc. In my heart, I think I knew this was coming. My favorite thing to do is completely restore old machines. I should've known once I started disassembling that I wouldn't stop. Plus the rats nest that was the wiring in the battery compartment sent shivers down my spine - I'll just feel better when they're all neat and organized! Plus I'll be able to take the cover off and get a good look inside the tranny to see if there's anything that needs doing in there.

I realized that I never really sent before pictures. Seems this thread is turning into a rebuild thread, so I'll add a few of what I got now. I mostly took videos so maybe when I finish I'll put a little youtube video together to show the before/during/after more completely.

Bought her for $1000 knowing virtually nothing about tractors beyond that I wanted some Old Iron (My woodshop is almost all vintage delta stuff, because I'm a nerd, but that's another story). Specifically, I wanted a gear-driven tractor, but a new cub cadet XT-3 was out of my price range. Saw this ad pop up, did a little research, seemed like bolens was a perfect match for my maintainable, powerful, versatile requirements, and so I pulled the trigger. Came with extra tires, snow blower, 40-something mower deck, snow blade, rear tiller, and chains.

Engine is an 18 horse briggs L head. You'll notice in the before picture that this bolens is a tiny bit longer than most - the guy who did the repower shifted the hood forward about 1.5" to fit the engine, which meant he had to move the central "column" of sheet metal back about the same amount so that the hood would still close neatly. He also moved the gas tank to under the seat, and modified the seat so that the seat itself flips up, not the whole white sheet metal that the seat is on. There are a few more holes in the sheet metal than stock, but whoever did the work was mostly neat and thoughtful, so I'll live with it. Or I'll weld in replacement pieces and grind it back to flush. As I may have mentioned, I often just cannot help myself. Seems like the people on this forum are the most likely to understnad! Other than those mods, it's pretty much stock as best I can tell.

The issues I found so far have mostly been talked about in this thread: brake pad needs replacing, clutch assembly friction material needs some love, wiring needs to be a bit neater, differential lock knob was basically locked on by a random hairpin, and just about everything in the tractor needed to go through the adjustment process. The guy clearly knew engines, though, because that is working like a dream.

With one exception - it was CHEWING starter pinion gears. Literally two or three starts on a brand new pinion gear, and you'd have to replace the gear because the teeth were gone. Like completely gone, no engagement with the flywheel ring gear at all. So after two gears in as many days, I replaced the entire aluminum ring gear on the briggs motor because it was fairly chewed up too (red flag number one). And I replaced the pinion gear assembly on the starter motor with a new one. In doing that, I found a bonus washer in that assembly, and it seemed to make the pinion gear sticky at the top of the spiral - it didn't want to come back down. It also made getting the c-clip off an absolute nightmare because you couldn't compress the assembly enough to get around it (red flag number 2). Anyways, I don't know if it was one or both of those fixes, but once I put it all back together and started it a few times, you couldn't even tell the pinion gear wasn't brand new. Problem solved!

From what I gather, the last owner put a metal pinion gear on at one point. I'm guessing the washer was an attempt at better engagement. Well the metal gears only have 14 teeth, so I think it screwed up the ring gear real good, because you're only supposed to use the plastic gears (16 teeth) with the aluminum briggs ring gears. Anyways, it's all speculation. And fixed now, so it's in the past!

After mowing the lawn with it once (mostly was great!), I noticed the clutch and differential problems, and so began the big dissassembly, which is now turning into a just-shy-of-the-tranny-and-engine disassembly. But it's good, I'm getting to know the tractor inside and out, and like every restoration, it's fun and worth it in the end. Plus I saw Chev's resto pictures and thought "yup, I must." I did notice when mowing that the belts were rather noisy. They were one of the few parts I couldn't lubricate because the bolts were frozen. Hoping new belts and lubrication will silence them.

I'll include the one before picture I have, the chewed up ring gear and pinion gear, the absolutely shredded brake pad, and one or two of the tractor as it stands now. Hopefully by the weekend I'll have everything I'm going to take off in the shop, and the restoration can begin in earnest!

2020-06-14 18.44.54.jpg 2020-06-16 19.45.15.jpg 2020-07-07 20.22.08.jpg 2020-07-16 18.11.02.jpg 2020-07-16 18.19.14.jpg


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#20 Dave in NY OFFLINE  

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Posted July 17, 2020 - 03:38 AM

Looks like it was a reasonably well done repower. You should have a nice worker when you get it back together and everything adjusted. I'd like to see how they did the under the seat gas tank.
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#21 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 17, 2020 - 01:32 PM

Once you get it all back together with everything checked out and adjusted you should have a very reliable tractor that will just require a little regular maintenance such as a few squirts of grease and oil as recommended in the owners manual.  If you are painting the brown I believe it was originally the same metallic brown that is was used on the 1050's - unfortunately after 50 years the brown paint tends to fade and may not appear to have any metallic to it.  Both my 1050's were done in leather brown when I stripped and painted them as I didn't know that the paint was metallic originally. :hitting_self_roller:


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#22 Dave in NY OFFLINE  

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Posted July 17, 2020 - 04:44 PM

My 1050 and 1220 are both done in leather brown also. I knew it wasn't quite correct when I did it but they look good enough to me for working tractors. 


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#23 fildred13 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 17, 2020 - 07:33 PM

Looking forward to having a good worker! Order a cub cadet hauler to haul lots of gravel and dirt all around, and I'm eyeballing some after market class-0 post hole diggers to help out around the ranch. We only moved into this place about 2 years ago, and we're looking at adjusting a bunch of the livestock fencing. Even if I have to stop the post hole digger for every rock and take the hard stuff out by hand, it would be a dream to let the tractor to the bulk of the labor!

I got a few different spray paints coming in. I'll try them all out with a clear coat and see what color I like the best. I'm not too worried about matching the exact bolens colors - something close but easily accessible around me is more important to me. Ain't a show tractor, but let's be honest I want that white and red to pop, at least till the first day of working :)

I'll take some pics of the gas tank when I take it off, it's the next thing coming off, hopefully tomorrow but the weather's good so might go paddleboarding or something. He basically took the gas tank as it was, along with what I think are two stock "strips" that wrap around the tank and hold it in place. Then he folded down the rear side of the "tool box" area under the seat and bolted it onto the rear part of the tool chest. Then he drilled a 3 inch or so hole in the white seat "shroud" underneath the seat itself to access the cap to fill 'er up.

I think originally the whole white part hinged up, rather than just the seat. I'd like to get it back to that at some point, but the seat is in fine shape so I'll do that "restoration" when the seat needs replacing in some years.



#24 fildred13 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2020 - 08:32 PM

Welp. Looks like this is turning into a bit of transmission work, too.

The good news is that the few milliseconds of grinding I did while learning the tractor clearly had virtually no effect on the gears. Unfortunately, looks like a previous owner at some point really tried to jam it into low gear, or maybe only half shifted into that gear, because like I've seen quite a few others on this forum, I've got the nearly-destroyed "Gear and Shaft", part number 1716477. Link to part: https://bolenspartsa...d-171-6477-new/

I think also the 1713409 "Gear 38T" has a bit of wear too, and if I'm going to be swapping gears out, I might as well do that one, too.

If anyone has a lead on any of those, let me know. I need to contact some of the suppliers to see if anyone's got one. I've seen Chev's write ups on making the repair yourself, and while I would love to give that a go, I haven't got my little home machine shop set up yet, and no running lathe means no making that repair. If I can't source some NOS, I'll have to get the gears out and hopefully a local machine shop will fabricate or repair for me for a reasonable price.

Otherwise, things are moving along. Everything is completely apart, or taken off as part of an assembly. Cleaning, sourcing new hardware, and painting for the next little while. I've included some photos of how the previous owner mounted the gas tank under the seat by bending down one of the lips of the tool tray.

Also, I included one photo of the rear wheel, and the pieces that are there. Notice the two washer, reference numbers 3 and 4 in the parts diagram. Is the closer-to-the-wheel washer (number 4) supposed to be that loose, such that only by the castle nut being tight holds it in place? And if so, is the wider side or the narrower side supposed to be against the wheel? Parts diagram looks like a quite different looking washer - I'm wondering if this is a jury-rigged washer or if this is original.

 

2020-07-18 18.27.43.jpg 2020-07-18 11.44.52.jpg 2020-07-18 11.43.17.jpg 2020-07-18 11.33.05.jpg 2020-07-18 11.25.35.jpg 2020-07-18 11.25.22.jpg 2020-07-18 11.23.48.jpg

 


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#25 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2020 - 06:59 AM

If the tractor was driving before, the gears are still useable as is until they fail or until suitable replacements can be found.  ...The gears can be de-burred to remove mal-formed metal.

 

Machine shop repairs are never inexpensive unless you have a friend in the trade.  ...Sometimes it is cheaper to buy a complete used transaxle.  ....In your case, that would correct many of the damage and modifications done to your gears, rear axle, and hubs. 

 

Your tractor has many modifications done by a previous owner.  ...That hole in the right rear wheel is not standard.  ...The hub and free-wheeling pin, have been altered from original, probably to repair other damage that had been done.  ...That large washer you are questioning is not original, either.  ...It is probably there to take up wear or to lock the hub to the axle (I hope not).


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#26 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2020 - 07:05 AM

Also, I included one photo of the rear wheel, and the pieces that are there. Notice the two washer, reference numbers 3 and 4 in the parts diagram. Is the closer-to-the-wheel washer (number 4) supposed to be that loose, such that only by the castle nut being tight holds it in place? And if so, is the wider side or the narrower side supposed to be against the wheel? Parts diagram looks like a quite different looking washer - I'm wondering if this is a jury-rigged washer or if this is original.

 

 

Looks like you are well on your way to getting an in depth education and having fun at the same time.

 

The narrow washer appears to be a jury rig replacement that was not there when the tractor left the factory.  If you check out the thread on my 1053 post # 56 https://gardentracto...-project/page-4 you can see what was used originally and I would assume your 1220 should be similar.  I assume the narrow washer is there to act as a spacer to keep the free wheeling hub snug where it sits and turns on the bronze bushing on the drive collar when the drive pin is not engaged so that the tractor can be pushed.  This would make me think that the bronze thrust washer (item #74 in the parts list) is missing or badly worn (you can see the bronze washer from mine (which was grooved from wear over the years) in pictures #9 and 10.  If that thrust washer is not there or badly worn then the inner face of the drive collar would be rubbing against the differential case (and seal) which would let the drive collar sit too far in on the axle when the free wheeling hub is in place . With the drive collar and hub being so far in then the free wheeling hub would not be held snug on the drive collar by the outer flat washers as was designed originally - this would allow in and out movement of the hub on the drive collar.  Looks like someone has cut a piece out of the rim to access the drive pin hole for some reason - just my opinions.


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#27 fildred13 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2020 - 08:02 AM

Good to know that I’ll have to have an eagle eye out for modifications even here in the transaxle. I’ll pull the hubs off and get a look at the bushings and whatever else is in there.

Also a good point about the tractor working. I guess I’ll finish the restoration sans rebuilding the transmission while I try to source a good used transaxle, or at least the gears that I want to replace. If anyone here has a used transaxle they’re willing to part with, let me know. I’ll start looking around locally to see if I can find someone whose parting out old bolens.

Edited by fildred13, July 21, 2020 - 08:03 AM.


#28 Dave in NY OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2020 - 03:28 AM

If you could find a parts tractor nearby for a reasonable price that might be a good solution to the transaxle dilemma. There must be a 6 speed tube frame tractor out your way lurking behind, or better yet in, a garage or barn that could be bought. If you were closer to me out here in western NY I know of 2 gear drive nonrunning tractors sitting beside a shed that could be had and they are about a mile from where I live. I haven't persued them as I have too many projects already.
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#29 fildred13 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2020 - 06:35 PM

Made a bit more progress today. Tried to get the clutch assembly apart but the threaded clutch flange for the pulley is absolutely stubborn. I'm letting Kroil Oil do it's work for the next few days and hopefully she'll come free without too much more cursing.

Meanwhile I took the wheels off and the freewheeling hub as well. I couldn't pull the other wheel hub (1716511, reference number 54) off, so I assume I was either being too timid because I wasn't sure what was holding it in, or there is something holding it in place inside the transmission. Am I blind, or does the Medium Tube Frame Service Manual not really touch on the hubs and their components? Section 3 covers the transmission in depth, including the axle, differential, and all those gears and components, but I can't find anything about installing everything else on the axle which is outside the transmission.

2020-07-23 17.13.50.jpg

The freewheeling hub pulled off without any trouble, though. I noticed a part of the casting was broken which holds the freewheeling pin in place, but that seems non critical really. The bronze thrust washer is in tact, and seems serviceable, but perhaps it isn't thick enough. I'll see if I can source a replacement, just to see what difference it makes, and it it will buy me enough time to get my machine shop setup before I tackle the transmission rebuild.

One question I had is: what is the "drive pin" in the free wheeling hub (Part number 1185409, reference number 18)? In mine, it just looks like a roll pin which has been driven down to touch the axle. There doesn't seem to be a slot in the axle to drive the pin into or anything. Seems strange - like it isn't doing anything. The end of the pin is just floating in the "void" inside the freewheeling hub.

2020-07-23 16.58.11.jpg 2020-07-23 16.58.16.jpg

Once I had the wheels off, I could move the whole axle left/right about a 1/4" maybe. This movement is the "axle end play" that the manual talks about, right? The adjustment procedure for that end play takes that end-play out by way of the two castellated nuts. The differential knob can then be turned by hand, when needed, to apply pressure to the hub, thereby locking the hub to the axle, which means your differential becomes locked. I had to have the whole transmission open and be literally turning the brake drum by hand, slowly applying pressure to different points, to fully understand what was happening, but I believe I get it now.



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Posted July 23, 2020 - 08:28 PM

Do NOT use a puller on the flange of the L.H. hub.  ....This part is cast-iron and can break VERY EASILY !!

 

If force is necessary, a BLUNT punch or piece of wood can be used against the inner-most part of the flange.  .....An air hammer or heavy hammer may be needed.


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