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Making A Stepped V Belt Pulley


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#16 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted June 22, 2020 - 03:52 PM

Well beyond my redneck capabilities!


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#17 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 23, 2020 - 10:58 AM

    Nice. I have never used tools that nice to make a key way. Only don it once with a hack saw,series of files and hours of work. 

   Looking at the setup for cutting the v in the smaller pulley I am sure my lathe would chatter so bad with that much reach out on the tool that it would drive me nuts Your lathe must be much tighter than mine.

   Don

Before I purchased the broach I found a relatively easy way to create a keyway was to machine a steel bushing that was the correct ID for the pulley and then make the OD the diameter of the top of the keyway.  Once that was done the bushing could be cut lengthwise to produce a slot the correct width with a hacksaw - usually made the slot a little narrow and finished it with a file.  Then the pulley could be bored to the OD of the bushing and the bushing could be welded into the bore.  Another way might be to bore the pulley, press a piece of round stock into the bore and use a 3/16" drill bit to drill a hole to start to create the key way (the round stock would allow the drill bit to stay cutting evenly.  Once the hole was drilled the round stock could be pressed back out and then a hack saw and file could be used to make the hole rectangular.  The reason I purchased the broach was that I could buy it for the same price as what someone wanted for a used PTO slip yoke at the time so I figured I would put the money towards the broach and repair my slip yoke and I would have the broach which I have used on several occasions to created 3/4- 6 internal splined collar inserts to repair slip yokes and pulleys.

 

I would not say my lathe is real tight by any means - I find chatter can sometimes be eliminated (or greatly reduced) by decreasing the speed the work piece is turning at and by also changing the tool bit profile.  The Atlas does have a backgear set up so that the speed of the work piece can be decreased dramatically if necessary.  Another thing that sometimes helps is if you have a rubber belt (old serpentine belt) or a strip of leather (old belt) and wrap it around the object where you are not machining it to create an antichatter band.  They can be held in place with a few wraps of electrical tape and if you use leather you can wet the leather with water and make it swell for a nice tight fit.  A few wraps of electrical, duct or masking tape around something like the pulley I am making might even be sufficient to remove or change the natural vibration frequency that we all have experienced at some point. Just some suggestions you could try.       

 

Well beyond my redneck capabilities!

Perhaps because you don't have a lathe but I have seen you fabricate some pretty nice things as well.


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#18 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 23, 2020 - 11:18 AM

Marked the position of the two set screw holes with a centre punch and drilled them using the drill press - started off at 1/8" and then enlarged them to the correct size for a 1/4"-20 UNC tap.  Dug out two new 1/4-20 set screws, tapped the two holes securing the pulley in the vise and after cleaning out the cuttings and oil tried them in the holes.  The size of the two set screws are perhaps a little overkill but they should do a good job of securing the pulley and key to the motor shaft.  Decided to machine a step in the end of the hub and then cut the stepped portion off with a hack saw with the pulley still mounted in the lathe chuck.  I set a piece of plywood on top of the lathe bed as I find this protects the bed from getting any more marks in it when the hacksaw finally cuts through the metal. Removing the material will lighten the pulley a little bit and then I faced the end of the hub to remove most of the hack saw marks.  Gave the pulley a quick polish on the outer face and hub and once that was done removed the pulley I had added a few years ago to hold the key and the old original pulley.  Debated about giving the new pulley a splash of paint but decided I would just mount it in its new home the way it is and so it got aligned with the driven pulley, the set screws tightened to lock it in place and the belt installed.  So far it looks like it will work fine and will probably outlast me. 

 

When the new lead screw shows up and I get some time it the lathe will get a serious cleaning and perhaps a new belt or two.  I also want to make a shield to keep any cuttings out of the motor and fabricate a chip / cutting tray to sit underneath the lathe bed to make it easier to keep clean.  I am also thinking of making extensions to fit on each side of the carriage out of vinyl to try and keep any cuttings from getting into the threads of the new leadscrew.  I have found that getting something shipped via the mail or a courier in todays world requires lots of patience as things are moving at a snails pace but at least they are still moving.  

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Set Screw Hole Location Centre Punched.jpg
  • 2 Second Set Screw Location Marked.jpg
  • 3 First Hole Drilled.jpg
  • 4 First Hole Drilled.jpg
  • 5 Second Hole Drilled.jpg
  • 6 1-4-20 NC Set Screws.jpg
  • 7 Holes Threaded.jpg
  • 8 Set Screws Tried In Holes.jpg
  • 9 Holes Threaded.jpg
  • 10 Holes Threaded.jpg
  • 11 Tap.jpg
  • 12 Creating Step Of Material To Be Cut Off.jpg
  • 13 Cutting Excess Off With Hack Saw.jpg
  • 14 Piece Cut Off.jpg
  • 15 End Of Hub Faced.jpg
  • 16 After A Quick Polish.jpg
  • 17 After A Quick Polish.jpg
  • 18 Pulley Installed On Motor.jpg
  • 19 Belt In Low Speed Position.jpg

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#19 secondtry ONLINE  

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Posted June 23, 2020 - 03:34 PM

I am starting on an adapter to mount an Ogura electric clutch on a Kohler magnum 18. Kohler shaft is 1 1/8, the clutch came on an Onan with 1 7/16 shaft. going to require 2 key ways. Haven't even measured for those yet. My old Atlas craftsman lathe was rescued from a caved in open front shed at a garage sale. Now it lives in my 60s era bomb shelter.

 

Atlas 005.jpg

 Gives a whole new meaning to the expression Man Cave.

 

So far I have cut off a piece of appropriate sized axle and drilled the center. 

 

Atlas 004.jpg

Don


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#20 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 23, 2020 - 03:52 PM

Nice rescue on the lathe - looks like yours is a little older than mine and is a 12" swing and uses ball bearings or bushings in the spindle.  Mine is a little newer version and has tapered roller bearings that can be adjusted so that the spindle has minimal play.


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#21 secondtry ONLINE  

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Posted June 23, 2020 - 05:52 PM

Yep. Got bushings in the head stock. Take off the cap and remove shims to adjust. It has had a long hard life and still  serves the function it was designed for. Just wish the previous owners hadn't lost and broke so many parts.

   Don


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#22 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2020 - 03:56 PM

Got the motor removed from the bracket and gave it a long overdue cleaning to remove most of the gunge and cuttings.  Several years ago the two ears on the plastic capacitor housing that covers the capacitor broke and as a temporary fix I used two pieces of mechanics wire to hold the cover in place.  Figured today was as good a day as any to repair it a bit more permanently so I made a band out of sheet metal to clamp the housing in place.  Put the two screws in and it seemed to fit fairly good so I gave the band a quick splash of grey paint.  Removed most of the gunge with a tooth brush dipped in a mixture of dish soap and water which seemed to work fairly well to lift the crud that had accumulated over the years.  Put the motor back on the bracket and then began fabricating a shield out of a Z shaped piece of sheet metal I had laying around - wasn't sure how it was going to turn out as I wanted a shield that was fairly easy to remove if necessary so the smaller pieces worked out well to start the fabrication and keep adding to.  Formed a piece and then added the two lower hooks and did a test fit and then added another piece above it and two more hooks.  Then I added a third piece to go over top of the motor to keep any crud / gunge / oil that gets on the belts and slung off from falling on the motor and the shield should keep most of the cuttings from getting inside the vent holes on the motor - doesn't happen very often but when it does makes a nasty snap and smoke light show that probably isn't very good for the motor.  Still a little snug where the drive pulley sits above the motor at the larger pulley steps to slip the belt on and off to change speeds so will still have to play with that a bit.  The way it is right now it is simply a matter of removing the motor to drive pulley belt and the shield will then slip up to release the four mounting tabs and then the shield can be slid out the pulley side of the motor. The shield should still allow lots of air movement and there is a thermal reset button on the motor if it gets too hot. Hopefully the shield will be where most of the crud accumulates allowing the motor to run a little cooler and should reduce the risk of the oily gunge accumulation on the motor getting too hot and starting a fire.   

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Mechanics Wire Holding On Capacitor Cover.jpg
  • 2 Broken Ear Piece.jpg
  • 3 Sheet Metal Band In Place To Hold Cover.jpg
  • 4 Sheet Metal Band In Place To Hold Cover.jpg
  • 5 Motor Cleaned Up And Back In Bracket.jpg
  • 6 Motor Cleaned Up And Back In Bracket.jpg
  • 7 Motor Cleaned Up And Back In Bracket.jpg
  • 8 Motor Cleaned Up And Back In Bracket.jpg
  • 9 Motor Shield Out Of Sheet Metal.jpg
  • 10 Motor Shield Out Of Sheet Metal.jpg
  • 11 Mounting Hooks To Hold Shield In Place.jpg
  • 12 Test Fit Of Shield.jpg
  • 13 Test Fit Of Shield.jpg
  • 14 Still Room For Air Movement.jpg
  • 15 Pulley Side.jpg
  • 16 Pulley Side.jpg
  • 17 Clearance Around Drive Pulley Still A Little Snug.jpg
  • 18 Hooks Catch On Bracket.jpg
  • 19 Hooks Catch On Bracket.jpg

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#23 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2020 - 08:27 AM

Got the shield tweaked so that it allowed easy clearance for changing the belt position on the drive pulley cluster so I was happy.  Added a short 1/8" rod tacked to the shield at the left lower corner and a spring from an old RWD Dodge brake adjuster cable as I found the shield wanted to try and slip upwards a little bit when in position.  The spring should hold it in place and eliminate any chance of it rattling due to vibration.  Added a splash of paint and after it dried I put it in its new home - will see how it works out. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Shield Painted.jpg
  • 2 Shield Painted.jpg
  • 3 Hook For Spring.jpg
  • 4 Shield Installed.jpg
  • 5 Shield Installed.jpg
  • 6 Shield Installed.jpg
  • 7 Shield Installed.jpg
  • 8 Shield Installed.jpg
  • 9 Clearance Around Drive Pulley.jpg
  • 10 Clearance Around Drive Pulley.jpg
  • 11 Clearance With Belt Tension Removed.jpg
  • 12 Clearance With Belt Tension Removed.jpg
  • 13 Clearance With Belt Tension Removed.jpg
  • 14 Clearance With Belt Tensioned.jpg
  • 15 Clearance With Belt Tensioned.jpg
  • 16 Spring Pulls Shield Down.jpg

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#24 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2020 - 07:55 AM

Made a little chip tray out of sheet metal as an experiment to sit on the bed under the chuck to see how well it would work to keep chips from falling onto the lathe bed under the chuck area.  It does work but I am not sure it is the best solution as it may be better to have a tray that moves with the carriage.  To see how it, the new motor pulley and the motor shield worked I turned a 3/8" clevis pin out of a short piece of 1/2" round stock for a little clevis project I am working on - made the pin lots long and still have to drill a cotter pin hole in it.  The pulley and motor shield worked great but I still need to make a chip pan or tray to sit under the lathe bed to catch the cuttings as you can see in picture 4.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Sheet Metal Chip Tray Experiment.jpg
  • 2 Sheet Metal Chip Tray Experiment.jpg
  • 3 Sheet Metal Chip Tray Experiment.jpg
  • 4 Need A Chip Tray For Under Lathe Bed.jpg
  • 5 .373 Inch Clevis Pin.jpg
  • 6 Test Fit Of Pin In Clevis U.jpg
  • 7 Test Fit Of Pin In Clevis U.jpg
  • 8 Test Fit Of Pin In Clevis U.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, June 28, 2020 - 09:22 AM.

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#25 Cal OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2020 - 06:32 PM

Nice job on the pulley. The 6'' Craftsman/Atlas lathes are nice to have around. Go to Walmart and but the 3 pack of baking sheets for less than $5. i have one under my Craftsman lathe bed, one for my HF band saw, and others I use when rebuilding carbs or anything with small parts to keep from losing them.


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#26 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 29, 2020 - 09:24 AM

Nice job on the pulley. The 6'' Craftsman/Atlas lathes are nice to have around. Go to Walmart and but the 3 pack of baking sheets for less than $5. i have one under my Craftsman lathe bed, one for my HF band saw, and others I use when rebuilding carbs or anything with small parts to keep from losing them.

Thanks for the suggestion.  Will probably make my own tray out of sheet metal as I am thinking about making it with a removable back to direct the chips and metal cuttings towards the tray so they don't land inward towards the wall. With a removable back it can still be easily slid out from under the lathe bed for easy dumping and cleaning. 


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#27 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 29, 2020 - 02:50 PM

Started to fabricate the chip tray today.  Had a piece of 20 gauge sheet steel that was 21" x 10" so marked it out to bend the sides and ends 1" from the edge.  Slit the sides 1" in from the ends so I could overlap the metal in the corners where the ends bend up. Bent the two ends up at a 45° angle with my sheet metal brake and then bent them back down flat again so they would fit in to bend the two sides up on 45° angles. With the sides and ends bent on an angle the outer edges at the top are 21-1/2" x 9" which should catch most of the cuttings from the bed and still allow the tray to slip in and out easily.  Formed the corners with a pair of vise grips and then welded them with the mig welder - this should keep any oil that falls in the tray to remain there rather than leaking out at the corners.  Trimmed the edges in the corners and then sanded the welds and the top of the corners with the angle grinder using a flap disc. By that time things were getting warm in the shop so I called it a day.  

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Sheet Metal Piece To Make Chip Tray.jpg
  • 2 10 Inches By 21 Inches.jpg
  • 3 Sides Bent Up At 45°.jpg
  • 4 Metal Pliers To Bend Up Ends.jpg
  • 5 Ends Were Bent Up And Then Flattened Before Bending Sides.jpg
  • 6 Ends Bent Up And Corners Formed.jpg
  • 7 Top Edges 20.5 Inches Across.jpg
  • 8 Top Edges 20.5 Inches Across.jpg
  • 9 9 Inches Wide At Upper Edge.jpg
  • 10 Corners Welded.jpg
  • 11 Corners Trimmed.jpg
  • 12 Corners Trimmed.jpg
  • 13 Bottom Edge.jpg
  • 14 Welds Sanded.jpg
  • 15 Tray Sits Reasonably Flat.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, June 29, 2020 - 02:51 PM.

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#28 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 02, 2020 - 03:48 PM

Got a piece of 22 gauge steel cut out to form the back piece that will clip to the chip tray at the bottom.  It is approximately 20-1/2" long x 11" high.  Formed an offset about 1" from the bottom edge, bent the top edge over to form a lip (that will be easier to grab with my fingers to pull up on the back) and bent the two sides about 1/2" in from the edges to create some stiffness to the piece.  Cut out two pieces of sheet metal 1-1/2" high to form two fingers so the back can slip over the edge of the chip tray and tacked them in place.  Did a test fit and things looked to be fitting reasonably well. so finished spot welding the finger pieces by filling in the 3/16" holes with the mig welder. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Back Cut Out And Partially Shaped.jpg
  • 2 Lower Corner.jpg
  • 3 Height Of Back Piece.jpg
  • 4 Top Edge Bent Over.jpg
  • 5 Offset On Lower Edge.jpg
  • 6 Back Side.jpg
  • 7 Pieces To Form Fingers At Bottom.jpg
  • 8 Test Fit Of Back On Tray.jpg
  • 9 Finger Pieces Welded To Back.jpg
  • 10 Finger Pieces.jpg

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#29 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 02, 2020 - 04:19 PM

Put another bend in the back piece near the bottom to allow the back to come up straighter so it would clear the drive pulley support better.  Used a piece of cardboard to create a template to cut out a piece of sheet metal to seal off the area around the spindle better.  Tack welded the sheet metal piece in place and it seemed to fit fairly good so I spot tack welded it to the back piece and did another test fit.  Made sure the cover would open ok so i could change belt speeds and also made sure I had clearance around the lever that engages the back gears.  After a few little tweaks I got it fitting to my liking so I started to clean the back and bottom chip tray up with a wire brush to get them ready for painting as the sheet metal had some surface rust on it and I also wanted to clean up where the welds were.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Second Bend Added Near Bottom.jpg
  • 2 Piece Cut Out For Around Spindle Area And Clamped in Place.jpg
  • 3 Piece Clamped In Place.jpg
  • 4 Piece Clamped In Place.jpg
  • 5 Test Fit After End Piece Tack Welded.jpg
  • 6 Piece Welded And Fit Around Lathe At Spindle.jpg
  • 7 Cardboard Pattern To Make ENd Piece.jpg
  • 8 Cover Still Opens To Change Belt Position.jpg
  • 9 Still Able To Move Back Gear Lever.jpg
  • 10 Starting To Wire Brush For Paint.jpg
  • 11 Starting To Wire Brush For Paint.jpg

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#30 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 03, 2020 - 10:03 AM

Got the two pieces painted and when they dried I placed them in their new home.  Had a spray can of satin white i picked up a while ago on sale so white became the colour of choice.  Figured the white would brighten up the area around the lathe bed - at least until it gets dirty and gungy.  The tray is about an inch shorter than the lathe bed area between the two feet pedestals which allows a bit of wiggle room so the chip tray can be slid in about an inch to allow easy removal of the back and then the chip tray can be slid out form underneath the bed for easy removal of the chips.  The back should direct most of the chips into the tray below which hopefully will make clean up a little easier when I use the lathe.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Chip Tray Painted.jpg
  • 2 Back Piece Painted.jpg
  • 3 Tray And Back In Place.jpg
  • 4 Fit Around Spindle.jpg
  • 5 Chip Tray Fit Under Bed.jpg
  • 6 Chip Tray In Place.jpg
  • 7 Back Gear Lever Disengaged.jpg
  • 8 Should DIrect Chips Into Tray.jpg
  • 9 Slight Gap At Tailstock Allows Wiggle Room For Easy Removal.jpg
  • 10 Gap At Tailstock End.jpg
  • 11 Edge Bent At 45° At Tailstock End.jpg

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