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Fiberglass repair help needed


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#1 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2020 - 08:03 PM

I'm working on a Power King 1212 which is also known as a Plastic king because of the fiberglass body.

I've never worked fiberglass before and this thing needs some TLC+.

I'm not even sure what questions to ask at this point. I guess I'm making this post so I can document and ask questions as I go.

On to the pics.
20200529_192029.jpg 20200529_192024.jpg 20200529_192011.jpg 20200529_191958.jpg
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#2 Doxey OFFLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2020 - 08:14 PM

I've done a fair amount of fiberglass work over the years.  You will have to use fiberglass mat on the back as well as the front.  Use mat not cloth, because cloth will show through over the years.  Rough sand both sides before applying the mat.  Check YouTube for more details.  The last time I bought fiberglass resin was a Wal-mart online.  Since you won't be using a lot of the mat, you can buy that there too.  Otherwise check Ebay 


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#3 WrenchinOnIt OFFLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2020 - 08:18 PM

Almost looks like it was gel coated. I’d rough up the back side good, remove enough material to lay resin saturated fiberglass mat and be able to finish with filler. After the backside is done I’d hit the show me side with a flap disk on the grinder again removing Enough material to be able to smooth finish, fill voids with Tiger Hair knock it down and use filler (bondo) to smooth. YouTube most likely has several how to’s to get the ideas rolling. 


Edited by WrenchinOnIt, May 29, 2020 - 08:18 PM.

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#4 billoswin OFFLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2020 - 09:54 PM

Fiberglass is fairly straightforward YouTube will be your friend. There is a channel called Boatworks Today he has a lot of good glass videos. they aren't tractor related but they are very helpful. Just make sure you wear gloves that stuff is sticky!


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#5 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2020 - 11:48 PM

Working with fiberglass is pretty straight forward and not difficult. Surface prep is important though. The You-tube suggestions are spot on. 

Be prepared to make a big mess. No matter how I try I end up with epoxy everywhere. 


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#6 4getgto OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2020 - 06:48 AM

Agree with everyone above. Don't be afraid of it as you can't really mess it up but you do have move along relatively quick. Stuff hardens before you know it. If you don't like how it turned out just grind it off and redo it...I
What's pictured above looks like an easy fix.

Edited by 4getgto, May 30, 2020 - 06:50 AM.

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#7 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2020 - 12:03 PM

Above info is spot on.  I like to drill 1/8" holes on both sides of a brake to give the glass something to anchor both sides together.  Do the same with plastic filler.


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#8 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 01, 2020 - 04:47 PM

I started the repairs today. I did not realize the supplies I picked up was the jelly resin instead of the liquid resin. I'm not sure I like this stuff. It spreads like bondo. The direction call for putting a thin layer of jelly down, the push the mat into the thin layer, and to spread another layer of jelly on before the first layer sets. It's just like mudding sheet rock, but a lot more messy and frustrating.

I think I'm getting more resin and less glass in the repair,that I would with liquid resin.

Do I stop with the jelly resin and switch to liquid?
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#9 4getgto OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2020 - 05:00 AM

Your repairs are in tight rounded areas. Never used the jelly resin but sounds thick and more to grind back off. I always used (im guessing) the thinner resin and add more layers of glass as needed letting cure in between layers. The thick stuff may have it place but I don't think in yor repair. Not if you want maintain the concore of your hood more easily.
I always use a paint brush to apply a coat of resin, lay a piece of fiberglass down, then paint another layer of resin on top and let cure. Always make sure your fiberglass matting is completely saturated. Repeat as necessary. Usually 2 layers will do sometimes 3.
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#10 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 06, 2020 - 01:30 PM

Progress has been made. I picked up some of the regular liquid resin earlier in the week. I've had a little bit of time in the evenings to work on it. I started with the bottoms side since it cant be seen easily when it's on the tractor. I used the side grinder and flap disk to gouge out and feather the cracks. Cleaned it up and started adding resin and mat to get the height back. I think I made all my major mistakes on the underside. I did the show side this morning and waiting for it to cure. Gotta take hunny bunny out for a little while this afternoon. I will get pics tomorrow.
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#11 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted June 06, 2020 - 01:40 PM

Figuring out how to cut and lay the mat is the hardest part. Nice thing is that the repaired area can be sanded into shape. 

Looking forward to your photos. 


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#12 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2020 - 02:20 PM

Show side prior to sanding

20200607_124025.jpg

After LOTS of sanding

20200607_143446.jpg
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#13 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2020 - 02:39 PM

The fender had a huge catch that was busted out. On the underside I used the flap sander to gouge out some relief for the patch. I used the jelly resin on thi underside because it sets hard in about 5 minutes. I had to hold the two pieces in alignment while it dried. Once it was cured, I sanded it down and added two layers of mat and liquid resin. I did this to the the foot rest to fender junctions because they were busted up bad too.

Once I had the underside the way a wanted and sanded down, I went to the top side. I used the flap disk again and gouged out relief on the busted areas. I took it down to where I could see the start of the bottom side repair layers. I probably made more work for myself than need by doing it this way, but I looked at it like a weld joint on thin metal. I needed full penetration to ensure that it wasn't going to start cracking again.

In the foot rest to fender junctions I had to use 4 layers of mat and resin to build it back up higher than the original surface. I sanded it back down flush with the original surface.

I still have some more build up to do since some pieces have been broken completely off and must be rebuilt.

Pic of the fender crack repair after sanding



20200607_143424.jpg

Pic of foot rest area prior to sanding

20200607_124034.jpg

After sanding

20200607_143431.jpg
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#14 4getgto OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2020 - 03:24 PM

I think your repair looks pretty darn good. You sure you never did this before??
Kinda fun too isn't it..?
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#15 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2020 - 06:03 PM

Thanks, and no it's not fun. 😉

I havent developed the patience for good body work. My attention span for a single sitting is usually around 2 to 3 hours. This is taking much longer than that and I havent even got to the painting part.

I'm estimating I've still got about 10 hours of body work left before I can get to painting.

I keep looking over at the 1212 and think that this body work is the only thing that's keeping me from using it.

O well 🤪
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