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need help deciding on tiller


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#1 husqvarnio OFFLINE  

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Posted May 08, 2020 - 03:56 PM

I'm a noob here, but have been lurking for a while. I have a dilemma I'm hoping to get some feedback on.

 

I have an Agri Fab tow behind tiller that the transmission (gears) went out on. The price of getting it fixed is gonna be in the $300-$500 range.  Nothing else wrong with it that I'm aware of right now.  

I could buy a brand new one of these for around 1300. Or, I could go with a Bercomac for about $1700. Or, DR products has a really nice 9 hp w/remote control for around 3000.

 

The DR is really out of my price range, but it has some nice bells & whistles. I don't know too much about the Berco, except what is on their website.  Has anyone here had or used one? Is it worth the money/hold up over the long-term?  

 

I'm trying to decide whether to fix up the 10 year old AgriFab or ditch it completely for something new. 

 



#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2020 - 08:19 AM

Welcome to GTT. I would take the engine off of the Agri Fab and then take the trany apart. Sometimes things can be fixed with just new bearings and shims. Keep the engine for other projects or trading material. I have an old Troy Bilt tiller that is probably 40 years old. The old Troy Bilts are well made and last. Try to find a good used one and take care of it. If you have a large garden, look at getting a garden tractor with a tiller attachment. Check CL for what is for sale in your area. The longer that you can wait, the more prices will drop over the summer. Check our Manuals Section(3 free downloads per day) for info you need. Good Luck, Rick


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#3 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2020 - 08:36 AM

In a world of ever decreasing quality, and lowest bidder supply chains, it doesn't make sense to me to buy a new product from a vendor whose product didn't survive a decade. The current model likely won't even last that long.  Good money after bad.  I have an Allis HB112 with a tiller that was built circa 1970 and it still works flawlessly.   Find a good used product that was built when quality and reputation was more important than profits.


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#4 James Bosma OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2020 - 01:35 PM

Some people think new is better but as most if us know the oldies are the goldies

At on time the old ones were cheap, but price has gone up since people have found that they are a better bang for your buck


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#5 husqvarnio OFFLINE  

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Posted May 13, 2020 - 02:00 PM

Thanks, all!!  Seems like the consensus is in.  Dont be in a big rush to replace. Look for quality used implements instead of brand new. That's what I was kind of thinking about anyway. Almost everything consumer grade is made on the cheap nowadays.  I can remember my dad had a Merry Tiller (back when it was still made from scratch to finish right here in the US.  Thick, heavy gauge steel used everywhere on that machine.  It stood the test of time for sure. You couldn't hardly do anything to it to kill it, so long as kept the maintenance up on it. And it took a lot of abuse for many, many years, plowing hard clay soil, etc.  The 70s era B&S engine finally died after probably 20+ years of this kind of treatment.  The rest of the tiller was intact.....  Anyway, I'm going to be on the lookout for older equipment that's hopefully still operational.  Great advice! Probably saved me some major buckos.


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#6 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted May 14, 2020 - 07:30 AM

Thanks, all!!  Seems like the consensus is in.  Dont be in a big rush to replace. Look for quality used implements instead of brand new. That's what I was kind of thinking about anyway. Almost everything consumer grade is made on the cheap nowadays.  I can remember my dad had a Merry Tiller (back when it was still made from scratch to finish right here in the US.  Thick, heavy gauge steel used everywhere on that machine.  It stood the test of time for sure. You couldn't hardly do anything to it to kill it, so long as kept the maintenance up on it. And it took a lot of abuse for many, many years, plowing hard clay soil, etc.  The 70s era B&S engine finally died after probably 20+ years of this kind of treatment.  The rest of the tiller was intact.....  Anyway, I'm going to be on the lookout for older equipment that's hopefully still operational.  Great advice! Probably saved me some major buckos.

Where is your Dad's tiller? You may be able to repower it. Good Luck, Rick



#7 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 14, 2020 - 07:51 AM

I have a Merry Tiller with a Tecumseh on it.



#8 [email protected] OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2020 - 12:13 PM

If you have the capability, patience, and time to take it apart; I am pretty sure you could post photos and with all the knowledge on this site you could probably fix it yourself.






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