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Making A New Seat Pan For A Bolens 1000 Model 190-01 Part Number 1716657


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#1 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2020 - 12:46 PM

It is a beautiful day as Mother Nature is giving a taste of what spring looks like today.  With the outside temperature at 45°F and the sun shining I decided to start on a new fabrication project in the shop today.  I made a new seat pan about 5 years ago for a Bolens 1000 when I recovered two seats for two members and at the time I made some notes and drawings to help me in case I ever had a need to fabricate another one.  A member has expressed interest in one so I have decided to try and make another complete new seat using my notes.  Since the Bolens 1000 (Model 190-01) was only produced for one year and had a very unique seat (part # 1716657) that is not overly abundant this thread may be helpful to present and future owners.  Rather than resurrect the original thread I did back in 2015 I am starting a new thread and I will try and go into more detail about how the seat was originally constructed and how a new seat pan can be fabricated along with drawing and measurements where possible that may help someone that wants to make a seat pan and cannot find an old original seat to use as a patten.  I have attached a picture of the seat from the parts illustration and also a picture of what an original seat would look like from the front and rear.  The seat consists of a metal seat pan, an upper and lower padding piece that are covered with red vinyl, a white plastic back with a hand hole and another piece of red vinyl glued to the front of the seat pan in the hand hold area.  The covered padding and the rear plastic piece were stuck to the metal seat pan on the front and back and then sewn together around the outer edge to join them together.  In my opinion this seat design was probably a bit expensive to construct and prone to failure because the plastic back and the cover were larger than the outer edges of the metal seat pan and relied on the sewing around the outer edge to keep everything together.  With the plastic back being sewn using a needle and thread it became a weak spot due to the needle holes punched through it (much the same way as perforated paper will tear easily where the holes are) creating an outer lip area that cracked easily with vibration over time.  Once the outer edge started to come apart the seat cover and metal seat pan would begin to deteriorate because moisture could then penetrate and start corroding the metal seat pan which I believe was left as bare metal at the factory.  Once the seat got to that point my guess would be that a lot of owners removed the cover and used just the bare metal pan or removed the seat and replaced it with one from another model tractor such as a 900 or 1050.  Sometimes the fender, which was made of fibreglass on the 1000 model, would also get replaced with one from another model given some of the pictures of the 1000 that I have seen over the years.

 

While a different seat functions and lets the tractor be used some people prefer an original seat so that their tractor can remain true to its roots and for those doing a restoration an original style seat is a "must have" as it is one of the parts that makes the Bolens 1000 model unique.     

 

Edit: For those interested here is a link to the original thread that I did 

https://gardentracto...ecover-project/

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • .5 Seat Picture From Parts Illustration.jpg
  • .6 Front View.jpg
  • .7 Rear View.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, March 09, 2020 - 07:47 PM.

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#2 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted March 08, 2020 - 01:01 PM

Got two pieces of 1/2" diameter round stock approximately 22" long bent and cut that will make the two supports that the upper and lower pieces of metal that created the actual seat bottom and back were welded to.  To make them I used the cardboard pattern I drew out that allows me to bend the rod a little bit and then lay it on the pattern to see how the shape looks.  Took a little time but with the help of my "fancy" bending equipment. the vise and a piece of pipe that I sometimes use to get the rod to bend at the correct spot and keep the other part of the rod straight I got them formed.  The pattern pictures show the length from each end (in inches) to where the bend starts to occur with the bottom part being longer than the upright section - the upright is at an angle of 100° in relation to the bottom part of the rod.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Bending The Half Inch Round Stock.jpg
  • 2 Bending The Half Inch Round Stock.jpg
  • 3 Using Piece Of Pipe To Get Rod To Bend At Bend Area.jpg
  • 4 Checking Against Pattern.jpg
  • 5 Marked At End To Be Cut.jpg
  • 6 Pattern To Bend Support Rods.jpg
  • 7 Close Up Of Upright Pattern.jpg
  • 8 Close Up Of Bottom Pattern.jpg
  • 9 Close Up Of Bend Area Of Pattern.jpg
  • 10 Two Pan Support Rods.jpg

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#3 Dave in NY ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2020 - 05:08 AM

I agree with your thoughts about the seat and fender pan. I have the tattered remains of a 1000 and the seat was a rusted mess. It was so bad it was crumbling, even the bars were weak from the rust. The poor tractor had been sitting outside for many years.The fiberglass fender was broken in several places with pieces missing. The worst was down inside the toolbox where the mounting bolts attached it to the top of the transmission. It was all so bad that I removed the whole mess and took it to the dump. I doubt if you could have gotten any accurate measurements from what little remained of the seat. It looks like you are off to a good start on another of your interesting and entertaining projects.
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#4 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2020 - 12:52 PM

Since it was another unusually warm day for this time of year and the sun was making an appearance I decided not to let it go to waste as they are talking rain for this afternoon and back to cooler temperatures for tommorrow.  Brought out the remains of a 4' x 8' 16 gauge sheet of steel and after a bit of hunting found the patterns for the lower and upper pieces that get welded to the support rods to form the seat pan.  Got the bottom piece marked out and then got out my "hi tech" sheet metal cutting tools since I don't have a plasma cutter and 16 gauge sheet steel is too heavy to cut with ordinary tin snips.

 

Cut slits at the one front corner area using the die grinder with the cut off blade and then used the saws all to do the straight cuts.  I find as I get younger I have to use the magnifier glasses more and more for close up work - as you can see in the 6th picture I got a little off the line so I had to stop and grab the magnifiers. Then it was much easier to see the line and I got the lower part cut out. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Marking Out Metal For Seat Pan Bottom.jpg
  • 2 Steel Marked Out.jpg
  • 3 Hi Tech Cutting Tools.jpg
  • 4 Slits Made For Blade With Cut Off Tool.jpg
  • 5 Close Up Of Slits Made For Blade With Cut Off Tool.jpg
  • 6 Cut With Saws All.jpg
  • 7 Bottom Cut Out.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, March 09, 2020 - 01:05 PM.

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#5 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2020 - 01:04 PM

Then I marked out and cut out the upper piece of steel.  Where the rounded upper corner areas are I used the die grinder as I have found that trying to cut sharper curves with the saws all tends to result in bent or broken saw blades.  In the fifth picture I got very close to finishing the cut along the bottom before things began to bounce due to lack of support and since it is hard to clamp something like that I finished the cut with the hacksaw.  You can also see in picture number 8 that there is a short section that I did not cut - since it was very close to the already cut edge I wasted the little bit of metal and just used the sander with the flap wheel to remove the material to the edge of the line.  Then I went around the outer edge with the sander and after that a flat file to remove any burrs or sharp edges.  This left me with two flat parts of steel to make the lower and upper parts of the seat pan - still have to mark out the bolt hole locations. rod locations, etc. and then roll the outer edges up with the sheet metal brake.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Pattern To Make Rear Piece.jpg
  • 2 Rounded Corners Cut With Cut Off Wheel.jpg
  • 3 Close Up Rounded Corners Cut With Cut Off Wheel.jpg
  • 4 Close Up Rounded Corners Cut With Cut Off Wheel.jpg
  • 5 Lower Piece Bouncing Due To Lack Of Support.jpg
  • 6 Hack Saw Finishes Cut.jpg
  • 7 Close Up Of Hack Saw Cut.jpg
  • 8 Small Area Will Get Squared Up WIth Sander.jpg
  • 9 Edge After Sander.jpg
  • 10 Sander With Flap Wheel.jpg
  • 11 Upper And Lower Metal After Edge Sanded And Filed.jpg
  • 12 Upper And Lower Metal After Edge Sanded And Filed.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, March 09, 2020 - 08:40 PM.

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#6 SteveinFL ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2020 - 08:53 PM

I'm really looking forward to watching this project. It seems as if every tractor has it's peculiar challenges to overcome in restoration to be able to make progress. This was definitely one of mine and I imagine for most looking to restore a Bolens 1000 and maintain the factory appearance of the one year only seat. When I bought mine it came with the remains of the factory seat - a heavily rust deteriorated bare pan that couldn't be used for an accurate pattern. Not knowing how it was originally constructed and having only seen photos of what they looked like I was left with the off chance an opportunity at a used one may eventually turn up. Thankfully, Stew agreed to do this one for me using patterns from previous projects. As is known on this forum he has done an amazing job with these so this should make for a really good tutorial for those wanting to learn one way how to fabricate their own.


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#7 kjmweld ONLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2020 - 09:06 PM

Thankfully, Stew agreed to do this one for me using patterns from previous projects. As is known on this forum he has done an amazing job with these so this should make for a really good tutorial for those wanting to learn one way how to fabricate their own.

He's definitely the best guy to have on the job when it comes to having an original replica made. You won't regret having him make it for you I'm sure. I haven't seen anything he's done turn out just mediocre, he will do & redo until he's got it "just rite," you won't receive a seat that he wouldn't put on one of his own meticulously restored tractors. That's just how the man operates.
I also enjoy these build threads he does, they're always very informative... But many times WAYYY beyond my capabilities.
Drive on Stew, looking great already. 👍👍👍
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#8 Dave in NY ONLINE  

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Posted March 10, 2020 - 04:51 AM

This just proves that a crafts person doesn't necessarily need lots of "high tech" tools to do a job well.
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#9 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted March 10, 2020 - 01:42 PM

Thanks for the kind words.

 

Cooler and very rainy / wet here today so I was glad I got the pieces cut out yesterday.  Got hole locations marked, centre punched and pilot holes drilled for the two bolt mounting holes, drain holes and weld holes in the bottom piece as well as weld holes in the back piece.  Enlarged the pilot holes to 5/16" diameter and also made a new cardboard template to check the roll at the outer edges so they will be reasonably uniform.  Got the outer edges marked for bending in the sheet metal brake to create the outer roll and I also marked outlines where the support rods will go on the rear sides of the bottom and back.  Took a picture of the cardboard template on my cutting mat so that people can duplicate it to get the outer curve - the grid work on the mat is 1/2" spacing. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Pilot Holes Drilled.jpg
  • 2 Pilot Holes Drilled.jpg
  • 3 Holes Enlarged To Five Sixteenths.jpg
  • 4 Holes Enlarged To Five Sixteenths.jpg
  • 5 Template To Check Curve.jpg
  • 6 Outer Edge Marked For Roll.jpg
  • 7 Outer Edge Marked For Roll.jpg
  • 8 Back Guide Lines Marked For Rods.jpg
  • 9 Bottom Guide Lines Marked For Rods.jpg

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#10 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted March 10, 2020 - 02:05 PM

Used the sheet metal brake to create the outer edge roll.  I started by doing a shallow bend at the very outer edge with the metal clamped inward for support.  Then I turned the piece around and did a shallow bend at each 1/2" line mark to slowly form the roll and checked the roll with the template as I went.  It takes a bit of force to bend 16 gauge steel but my homemade brake and my arm was up to the challenge.  The reason I turned the piece around after making the outer bends was so that the piece did not get trapped after being bent as my brake does not have a large opening between the bed and the top clamp. A couple of times I had to flatten out the bend a little bit which is fairly easy to do - just clamp the lip in the brake and then use a length of 2 x4 laid flat on top of the metal to push on to force the bend back a little bit.  Got the outer rolls where they looked uniform and not too bad in my opinion - a true metal rolling machine would do a smoother job without the ridges at the bends but as stated sometimes we don't have the fancy hi tech tools and make do with what we have to work with. Since the metal gets covered by padding on the top and vinyl on the rear the little bend marks should not be an issue in the finished seats appearance.  By this time I was feeling a little cold so I called it a day.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Starting Outside Edge Of Roll.jpg
  • 2 Creating Roll With Pan Piece Turned Around.jpg
  • 3 Creating Roll With Pan Piece Turned Around.jpg
  • 4 Checking Roll With Template At Front.jpg
  • 5 Checking Roll With Template At Rear.jpg
  • 6 Checking Roll At Other Side - Template Reversed.jpg
  • 7 Checking Roll At Other Side - Template Reversed.jpg
  • 8 Checking Roll At Other Side Rear.jpg
  • 9 Lower Piece After Edges Rolled.jpg
  • 10 Back Piece Rolled Using Same Method.jpg
  • 11 Checking Back Piece WIth Template.jpg
  • 12 Checking Back Piece WIth Template.jpg
  • 13 Bottom And Back After Rolling.jpg

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#11 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2020 - 02:05 PM

The rain stopped and we had a heavy frost last night but there was only a gentle breeze this morning so I decided to see if I could get the pieces assembled to form a seat pan.  I wanted to form a slight dimple or recess where the nuts go for the mounting bolts so that when the seat is bolted to the hinge the vinyl at this spot will be getting clamped against the hinge so that the rest of the hinge metal doesn't try and cut into the vinyl.  Normally I would have used my press put the pan was too large to fit so I used the other method I have for dimpling heavy sheet metal.  Put a large socket under the hole area and then placed a piece of 1" round stock on top and gave it a love tap with the hammer - not pretty but created the dimples.  Then I sanded around the hole areas to remove any metal burrs. Did a test fit of the rods and found that the last little bit of the rods had a slight curve at the start of the bend so it would not allow the rods to fit flat against the bottom of the lower pan. While it would have probably functioned ok I adjusted the rod bends so the rods fit flat - used the vise and a pipe wrench to get them reshaped where I wanted them to bend - marks the edge a little bit but does the job.  Another problem that can occur when hand bending the rods is that they can develop a twist at the bend area so that the rod does not lay flat as you can see one rod did in picture 7.  Again the vise and the pipe wrench worked to adjust the rod so it lay much flatter as you can see in picture 8.  Then, after I cleaned up the rod to make it weld nice I began to clamp the rods to the lower pan section with vise grips.  Once they were close to where I wanted them for the angle as they roll in a bit where they connect to the back I clamped the back in place and used a piece of cardboard 4-3/8" long curved along the rod bend to set the spacing between the bottom and the back. Took a bit of time adjusting things but I finally had them close enough to my liking and added some more clamps using C clamps on the back and C clamp vise grips on the bottom.  Once that was done I verified the spacing at the rear one last time and decided it was close enough to do.  

 

I have speculated as to whether Bolens actually made the seat pan assembly for the 1000 or purchased it from an outside supplier - guess I will never know.  I assume whom ever made the seat frame had a jig set up so they could just set the pieces in place, clamp and start welding rather than the way I did it??

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Dimpling Tools.jpg
  • 2 Forming Slight Deprssion In Metal At Bolt Hole.jpg
  • 3 Area Around Holes Sanded.jpg
  • 4 Area Around Holes Sanded.jpg
  • 5 Support Rod Not Flat Against Metal.jpg
  • 6 After Rod Reshaped.jpg
  • 7 Twist In One Rod At Bend.jpg
  • 8 After Adjusting Twist.jpg
  • 9 Checking Spacing Between Lower Back Pan Along Curve Of Rod.jpg
  • 10 Checking Spacing Between Lower Back Pan Along Curve Of Rod.jpg
  • 11 Starting To Clamp Things.jpg
  • 12 Starting To Clamp Things.jpg
  • 13 Mores Clamps.jpg
  • 14 Mores Clamps.jpg
  • 15 One Last Check.jpg
  • 16 One Last Check.jpg

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#12 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2020 - 02:30 PM

Looked things over and the seat looked like it was symetrical so I welded through four holes in the bottom and the back to the support rods and let things cool.  While the welds cooled I dug out the plastic back that I had saved from one of the other seats that I redid back in 2015.  I removed the clamps and checked to see how the rods and lower pan sat on a flat surface - had a slight rock so I gave the one rod a little force with my hands at the top and bottom of the seat pans and tried it again and the seat sat flat.  Then I set the seat pan onto the plastic back to see how  things looked.  Since the plastic is old, cracked and possibly twisted it is hard to know if is the correct shape of what a new one would be (if one existed) but in checking I think the new seat fit the back fairly well and the rods fit nicely into the trough areas that are molding into the plastic. One thing I had noticed yesterday when I was rolling the outer edges of the lower pan was that the right side edge appeared to be a little bit wider than the left and sitting the seat pan in the plastic confirmed this as I had marked the original seat edge back in 2015 when I did Rick's seat.  I drew a line on the metal where the outer lip should be and after I was done welding the right edge got adjusted with the sander.  The hand hold area where the curve is looked not bad against the seat so I clamped the seat pan at the remaining holes and then finished welding them to the rods.  Then I ran three welds along the sides of the rods about an inch long at the bottom and back to add strength to the seat bottom and back where they attach to the rods.  I also welded two 5/16" UNC nuts at the mounting holes for the hinge. Once the welds cooled I checked the seat pan again to make sure it still sat flat which it did but because of the welding heat the lower pan had developed a slight oil can effect.  I laid a piece of 2x4 in the middle and gave it a love tap with the hammer which cured the problem.  Attached are pictures of the finished seat pan - hopefully Steve recognizes it and says it looks close to what his old one does and is satisfied with the results.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Tacked Together.jpg
  • 2 Plastic Back Left Over From First Seat Project.jpg
  • 3 Test Fit Of New Seat.jpg
  • 4 Bolt Holes Very Close.jpg
  • 5 Back Area Test.jpg
  • 6 Back Area Test.jpg
  • 7 Seat Pan Needs To Be Trimmed At Line.jpg
  • 8 Hand Hole Area Fits Not Bad.jpg
  • 9 Ready To Weld Nuts And Last Holes.jpg
  • 10 Nuts For Mounting Bolts In Position.jpg
  • 11 Seat After Welding.jpg
  • 12 Seat After Welding.jpg
  • 13 Seat After Welding.jpg
  • 14 Seat After Welding.jpg
  • 15 Seat After Welding.jpg
  • 16 Seat After Welding.jpg
  • 17 Seat After Welding.jpg
  • 18 Seat After Welding.jpg
  • 19 Seat After Welding.jpg
  • 20 Left Edge Of Lower Pan.jpg
  • 21 Material Sanded Along Right Side To Match Left Side.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, March 11, 2020 - 03:18 PM.

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#13 logmillingman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 12, 2020 - 07:43 AM

Stew amazing work as always thanks for sharing this!


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#14 Austen OFFLINE  

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Posted March 12, 2020 - 11:25 AM

Another great seat restoration. Thanks for posting (and in such detail like you always do too).


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#15 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted March 12, 2020 - 01:33 PM

Thanks for the kind words.

 

Had some other tasks that kept me busy for most of this morning but I did take a few minutes to find the paper patterns for the padding that I made when I did the other seats.  Added some more measurements to them and I also got the base padding for the bottom and back cut out.  Since the bottom padding was originally 2-1/2" thick I used a piece of 2" thick padding that will form the base.  The rear padding was originally 2" thick at the outer edge and 1-1/2" thick at the pleated area so I used a piece of 1" thick padding that will make the base for it.  For those reading this that may sound like the padding won't be thick enough to match the original thickness which is correct.  However the pleated areas of the back and bottom cover are formed using 1/2" thick sew foam so when it is added to the equation the padding will become correct thickness in the pleated area once the cover is in position.  The outer edges of the bottom and back will have padding layered on top so they are built up to the correct thickness. Right now I just need the padding outside dimensions to be correct so that I can set the padding on the bottom and back areas and see where the outer edge of the seat needs to be extended so the metal part of the seat will be the same size as the padding.  

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Bottom Padding Patern.jpg
  • 2 Back Padding Pattern.jpg
  • 3 Back Padding Base One Inch Thick.jpg
  • 4 Bottom Padding Base Two Inch Thick.jpg

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