Jump to content

Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

H14-time to have a look


  • Please log in to reply
181 replies to this topic

#46 logmillingman OFFLINE  

logmillingman
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 68213
  • 2164 Thanks
  • 896 posts

Posted February 07, 2020 - 07:18 PM

I'm pretty sure that it's the better way to go.

I agree like I mentioned earlier in the thread I am swapping out the inline filter on my H 14 with the earlier model spin on filter that sits inside the right hand side of the fender pan support bracket the same way the 1256's did.

 

I am following along enjoying your build! :thumbs:


  • KennyP, Dave in NY and kjmweld have said thanks

#47 Dave in NY ONLINE  

Dave in NY

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7601
  • 1665 Thanks
  • 621 posts

Posted February 08, 2020 - 07:14 PM

Thanks! I don't find it all that exciting some times.LOL Seems everything I touch I find another thing that needs attention. Oh well, I sort of expected it. Todays project was to get the dribble tray figured out and make up a new steel line to connect the filter manifold and transaxle. I got a piece of metal cut and bent at 90* at work a couple days ago that I figured would work for the drip tray. I decided to put a few creases in it with the press to give it a bit of a curve to help any oil that might drizzle while changing the filter to run out instead of onto the top of the transaxle and frame tube. Not very fancy but looks like it ought to work. Next was the steel line. I screwed up first attempt and had to rethink the strategy and start over. The second try turned out good enough and it too looks like it should work ok. Used the new pieces that I got from NAPA. Didn't cut up the original for the sleeves and nuts. Probably should have, good chance the original will never be used again. I then went after the brake assembly and got that freed up and possibly adjusted close to what it needs to work properly. I tested the switch that is on the brake linkage bracket that is a safety feature and found it works. At least my electric meter shows it so. I'll know more on that later. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 100_0551.JPG
  • 100_0552.JPG
  • 100_0553.JPG
  • 100_0554.JPG
  • 100_0556.JPG
  • 100_0555.JPG
  • 100_0557.JPG
  • 100_0558.JPG
  • 100_0559.JPG

  • KennyP, 29 Chev, logmillingman and 2 others have said thanks

#48 29 Chev OFFLINE  

29 Chev

    A Little Off Plumb

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 63590
  • 19392 Thanks
  • 6574 posts
  • Location: Ontario Canada

Posted February 09, 2020 - 09:36 AM

Nice work on the filter mount and the oil flow tray.  You may wish to form the last 1/4" of the lip downward a little bit so that the oil doesn't try to flow inward underneath the edge from tension as the flow slows to a trickle during a filter change.  Just a suggestion depending on how far out the edge of the tray extends past the tube frame clamps below it so the oil doesn't drip onto them - hard to tell from the pictures.


  • Dave in NY, logmillingman, kjmweld and 1 other said thanks

#49 Dave in NY ONLINE  

Dave in NY

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7601
  • 1665 Thanks
  • 621 posts

Posted February 09, 2020 - 11:55 AM

Good idea! The end of the tray is past the clamps by just a bit. Didn't measure it. I'll see what I can do about that.
  • logmillingman said thank you

#50 Dave in NY ONLINE  

Dave in NY

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7601
  • 1665 Thanks
  • 621 posts

Posted February 09, 2020 - 07:47 PM

Didn't get much tinker time in today. I did finaly manage to get the steering gear and arm removed from the shaft and that removed from the support tunnel. I had considered leaving it all together but discovered that the oilite bronze bushings were worn a bit and I decided they ought to be replaced. If the bushings had been snug I might have left it together and run it through the electrolisis bath as an assembly, I doubt it would have hurt anything. Of course the gear and arm were rusted solid to the shaft and it won't come out of the support without being able to slide them off the end. I've been soaking it with Kroil oil for a few days and rattling it with a blunt punch in the air chisel. Wasn't making much progress. Yesterday I finally got the gear to slide free of the arm but the arm wasn't giving up. Got out the oxy-acetylene torch and heated it up really good till it was almost turning color and then let it cool off till I could put oil on it without smoking badly. Had to wait about 15 minutes and soaked it good with oil. I could see the oil soaking down in between the arm and shaft. So I left it for the remainder of the day and got after it with the air hammer again. After a few seconds it broke free and I was able to slide it apart. Then I pressed the old bushings out with a couple of sockets and a piece of threaded rod. Now it can get a dip in the electrolysis tank.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 100_0560.JPG
  • 100_0561.JPG
  • 100_0562.JPG
  • 100_0563.JPG

  • 29 Chev, logmillingman, kjmweld and 1 other said thanks

#51 29 Chev OFFLINE  

29 Chev

    A Little Off Plumb

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 63590
  • 19392 Thanks
  • 6574 posts
  • Location: Ontario Canada

Posted February 10, 2020 - 01:21 AM

Great work as always.  Sometimes if you can drive the left bushing out then you can gain just enough wiggle room to slide the shaft with the gear and arm out of the support tunnel.  Easy to do on a gear drive tractor as you can slip a thin wall piece of plastic pipe with a slit cut in it so it is a snug fit on the shaft (snug it down with a hose clamp) that protrudes for the clutch and then drive the pipe inwards pushing the bushing inward in the process to remove it from the tunnel.  Not sure how well it would work on a hydro unit since the shaft doesn't extend out on either side so it might be difficult to make sure the nylon pipe was centered on the bushing.  You could possibly slide the shaft towards the left a little bit so it protruded and then slip the plastic pipe over it.  If you could then the shaft with the gear and arm would be separated from the support and less awkward to place in a press if desired to try and get the shaft to move.  It usually still requires heat and patience as sometimes they are really on there tight and won't budge.  Just a thought.    

 

Here is how I removed the left bushing on my 1053 which is a gear drive tractor (post 76) 

 

https://gardentracto...-project/page-6


  • KennyP, Dave in NY, logmillingman and 1 other said thanks

#52 Dave in NY ONLINE  

Dave in NY

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7601
  • 1665 Thanks
  • 621 posts

Posted February 10, 2020 - 06:02 AM

Thank you! I do remember that, as I was following your posts on the rebuild. I was considering using something along those lines to push the bushing out so the shaft could be maneuvered out of the support. If I had failed with the heat, oil and air hammer I was going to attempt that next. I forget which tractor it was that I was working on, but being as the shaft was worn and pitted on the ends where it rode in the bushings, I decided to replace the shaft and hacksawed it in half to get it apart. Then used the press to get the arm and gear off the remains of the original. If I owned a metal lathe I would be more inclined to repair shafts and pulleys than replace them.
  • 29 Chev and logmillingman have said thanks

#53 29 Chev OFFLINE  

29 Chev

    A Little Off Plumb

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 63590
  • 19392 Thanks
  • 6574 posts
  • Location: Ontario Canada

Posted February 10, 2020 - 09:44 AM

If I remember correctly it didn't take much force to get the bushing to move.  Just thought I would mention the method as my knees don't enjoy working at floor level anymore and just the shaft would be easier to handle / maneuver than the whole support. 


  • Dave in NY, logmillingman and Dukedkt442 have said thanks

#54 Dave in NY ONLINE  

Dave in NY

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7601
  • 1665 Thanks
  • 621 posts

Posted February 11, 2020 - 08:00 PM

I understand all about the working down on the floor! I should,could build a bench just for the purpose of working on small tractors,mowers. It's on the list of things to do. So I got to looking at the support piece and figured it ought to get straightened out a bit before I put it through the electrolysis tank. I discovered that the lower edges where the mounting lugs go were a bit tweaked. I surmise that someone crashed into something with the mower deck and that bent all 4 corners of the support. The rear was the worst. I used hardwood blocks, the anvil. big hammers and even pushed on it a bit with the hydraulic press. Got it straightened out as good as possible. Looks good when checking with a straight edge. I found it was spread out about 1/4" wider than it should be, but could be sprung back when the bolts were tightened for the front bearing support plate. I made a bar to go across the back the same width as the bearing plate and bolted them both down tight. Then I used the torch to heat along the top and lower bend lines in various places to hopefully stress relieve it and bring it back to its proper width. I also discovered that both holes where the nylon bushings fit to mount the treadle shaft were worn egg shape. Both nylon bushings were worn completely through and the shaft was metal to metal with the support tunnel. Been wondering what I was going to do about that. I finally decided that I was going to install bronze bushings for the treadle shaft like the steering shaft has. The bushings are easy to find items at most well stocked hardware stores, etc.  I used a 3/4" reamer to open up and resize the two holes and then added additional support on the inside for the bronze bushings to ride in. I cut the 2 rings from a piece of round stock I found that was bored to 3/4" I brazed them in place while holding them in alignment with a length of round stock. The only thing this will change is I will have to drill a hole for a cotter pin on the inboard side of the treadle shaft as the inner snap ring grove will be inside the bronze bushing. Maybe I can cut a new grove in the proper place with a hacksaw blade. Figure that one out a bit later. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 100_0564.JPG
  • 100_0565.JPG
  • 100_0569.JPG
  • 100_0566.JPG
  • 100_0567.JPG
  • 100_0568.JPG

  • KennyP, 29 Chev, logmillingman and 1 other said thanks

#55 Dave in NY ONLINE  

Dave in NY

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7601
  • 1665 Thanks
  • 621 posts

Posted February 12, 2020 - 06:35 PM

I loosened the bolts this afternoon and found that the heating along the bends of the support got it back to shape as it didn't spread out away from the bearing plate like it was doing. Glad that worked! Took some parts out of the electrolysis tank and put it in their place. I had the top and bottom pieces of the fan- coupling guard in the tank and they came out looking pretty good. Gave them a rinse with fresh water then a good wire brushing followed by vigorous scuffing with a 3M pad. Then a coat of Rustoleum rust reformer. I used the hydraulic press to push the pulley off the drive shaft. Had been soaking it with Kroil Oil for a couple of weeks and finally got the set screws broke loose a couple days ago. I still haven't gotten the set screw in the collar behind the bearing to break free yet. Soaked it with oil again. I'll try again in a few days. Maybe use the small impact on it, heat it if all else fails.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 100_0571.JPG
  • 100_0572.JPG
  • 100_0570.JPG

  • KennyP, 29 Chev, logmillingman and 1 other said thanks

#56 kjmweld ONLINE  

kjmweld
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 85357
  • 3194 Thanks
  • 1216 posts
  • Location: Upstate, N.Y.

Posted February 12, 2020 - 07:18 PM

It's such a pain getting things freed up after years of being set up, but just think of how nice it'll all work when it's done & put back together. Not to mention not hearing the creeks, squeeking, or other funny noises that you shouldn't be hearing that drive you nuts trying to figure out where it's coming from.
  • KennyP, Dave in NY and logmillingman have said thanks

#57 Dave in NY ONLINE  

Dave in NY

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7601
  • 1665 Thanks
  • 621 posts

Posted February 12, 2020 - 08:42 PM

Yes it sure has been a challenge getting things loose that have been rusted solid for years. I suspect this tractor has spent a bit of time out in the elements.

Edited by Dave in NY, February 13, 2020 - 06:00 AM.

  • KennyP, logmillingman and kjmweld have said thanks

#58 Dave in NY ONLINE  

Dave in NY

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7601
  • 1665 Thanks
  • 621 posts

Posted February 15, 2020 - 07:10 PM

My project for today was to remove the left frame tube and get started on it. Took me a few minutes with the grinder to get the tubing motor mounts off. Of course the tube was squashed egg shape where the axle support and motor bolts go. When I got examininig it more closely I found 2 stress cracks by the axle support bolt holes. I also found the tube had about a 1/4" bend downward right near the motor bolt holes. I was able to squeze it back round by using the pipe jaws of my vise and hammering on it a bit to stress relieve it. I then put the tube in the press and applied a bit of pressure and heat from the torch to see if it would go back straight. Took 3 tries to get the bend out. I was being quite conservitave with the press and the heat, didn't want to over do it and have it bent in the opposite direction. Finally got it, according to the 24" leg of a carpenters square. Way better than it was. Then I ground out and welded up the cracks. Got it buffed to bare metal mostly. I still have to weld in the reinforcement plates. I think I will make new ones a few inches longer and of thicker material like I have done on my other tractors. So that was it for this afternoon. Going to scrape and clean on the transmission too, and get the crud off that pressure washing didn't get. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 100_0574.JPG
  • 100_0575.JPG
  • 100_0576.JPG
  • 100_0577.JPG
  • 100_0578.JPG
  • 100_0579.JPG

  • 29 Chev, logmillingman and kjmweld have said thanks

#59 kjmweld ONLINE  

kjmweld
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 85357
  • 3194 Thanks
  • 1216 posts
  • Location: Upstate, N.Y.

Posted February 15, 2020 - 07:40 PM

Nice. Getting tube/pipe back to round again is usually very much a challenge. Most times it requires some sort of a tappered die that's just undersize of the id & even then is usually a pain to get back out without some persuasion from the other side. All things considered, I'd say you got lucky.
Coming along nice, I'm enjoying watching you go thru the tractor.
  • Dave in NY and logmillingman have said thanks

#60 Dave in NY ONLINE  

Dave in NY

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 7601
  • 1665 Thanks
  • 621 posts

Posted February 16, 2020 - 07:56 AM

Well, the tubes weren't out of round excessively. It was noticeable though. Would have been nice to have a tapered die that could have been pressed or driven through to reshape it. I started by driving a foot long piece of 1/4" x 1 3/4" wide plate down inside while squeezing the tube in the pipe jaws. Same piece I made when fixing up the frame tubes of the 1220 a couple of winters ago. It came right back out by griping the end of it with vise grips and tap-taping on them with a small hammer. I have an older set of vise grips that get used for operations like that. I grind the weld spatter off them from time to time. They have plenty of grind and hammer marks on them. Tough tool! The newer version of the vise grip brand isn't as good as the older ones. And the Chineese cheapies- save your money. Look for the older but still in good condition vise grips at yard and estate sales for a few bucks. I'm always on the lookout for older, quality tools.
  • logmillingman and kjmweld have said thanks




Top