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Thoughts on the Bigger GT's


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#1 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted November 30, 2011 - 07:20 PM

AC ...not sure what you're gonna do with it, they are real nice strong tractors. But the 200 series are little work horses as well and will surprise you with their stoutness and build quality. Last winter I was able to blow snow all winter long with the 224 (Torq) and was not disappointed at all in its ability to work... However the 446 and 448 are amongst the best working garden tractors available...so, if you had to spend a grand to garner one, that thousand would be water under the bridge and you'd enjoy every second of the work the tractor would do for ya...GL

Edited by MH81, December 03, 2011 - 09:27 AM.


#2 Guest_ACguy1994_*

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Posted November 30, 2011 - 09:17 PM

well now i mainly just want the big garden tractors. ive got the bolens ht20 which never seized to amaze me with it strength, now since i should have a grand coming my way im either going to get into flipping older small farm tractors or get another big GT. either a wheel horse d series or a case 448.

#3 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted November 30, 2011 - 11:11 PM

For sure good choices...hard to beat a 448...

#4 Guest_ACguy1994_*

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Posted December 01, 2011 - 06:25 PM

well nut case id have to have all 3 to make an honest comment. seeing as the ht20 breaks 3" of virgin root filled ground in 1 pass with the 54" hydro angle blade with ags and wheel weights thats tough to beat. when i get the kubota engine in it in a week or so then it should break 4+ inches due to all the extra weight in the front. id love a case 448 and see what it can do and give it an honest to god review. ive heard there good in snow due to taller tires.

#5 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2011 - 11:26 PM

well nut case id have to have all 3 to make an honest comment. seeing as the ht20 breaks 3" of virgin root filled ground in 1 pass with the 54" hydro angle blade with ags and wheel weights thats tough to beat. when i get the kubota engine in it in a week or so then it should break 4+ inches due to all the extra weight in the front. id love a case 448 and see what it can do and give it an honest to god review. ive heard there good in snow due to taller tires.


I've heard the same thing...
Case 448 Night Work.wmv - YouTube

and this is ME on my 224 Torq last winter, ya it is a smaller wheel, but this thing handled all the snow I could throw at it last winter...it was a 'blast' to drive...
Posted Image

#6 Guest_ACguy1994_*

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 07:47 AM

those single stage blowers do give it hell, but i remember with my bolens h14 with a blower if i had under 6 inches it didnt do much. thats why soon ill put the bolens ht18d custom to the test with a plow, and if life works out well, the engine might line up with my pto pulleys so i can have pto's still and try a large frame snowblower. also whats the difference between a 224 and a 224 torq?

#7 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 07:58 AM

ac this is Steves thread lets get another thread going...for our discussions

#8 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 09:33 AM

ac this is Steves thread lets get another thread going...for our discussions


I moved the ones that were a little off topic for the original thread, hope that was OK.

#9 Guest_ACguy1994_*

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 02:11 PM

how heres my thing, this case 446 barely blows snow in high range. Case 446 blowing snow - YouTube

#10 Guest_ACguy1994_*

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 02:15 PM

now i almost really want a 448 or 446 to see how they are. but i got to get one cheap enough where if i dont like it i can still make a few bucks on it.

#11 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 05:14 PM

I had one of the big JD's (x475) for 3 years. I'm not sure how it would compare to the older GT's you are discussing but it sure was a treat to use. The one thing it lacked was a 2 range transaxle and if I could fault it in any way it would be a lack of tractive power due to the highish gearing. I had a chance to try an x748 a few years ago and that is one impressive tractor. It has AWS, 4wd and diesel. It uses hydraulic wheel motors on the front wheels so you get both wheels pulling and braking for you. Once again it does not have a low range.
I'm not sure how much capability you gain when going from a good sized GT to a Super GT. Sometimes you get more convenience features and more size but not much more in terms of versatility with attachments and PTO's etc. Perhaps someone who has had both tractors could talk about the differences in capabilities between a 224 and a 444 for instance, or a similar comparison with other brands. In my case I decided I wanted to do loader work and build trails so I went up to a compact JD2320. The larger tractor is stronger and can do much more work but it is not as maneuverable and easy to handle as the smaller 475. This is another tradeoff you need to consider.

#12 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 05:41 PM

Well here is my 'spin' on this...and an answer to the 'Torq' question.

First with all single stage blowers 'rpm's' are key so if your engine is powerful enough to maintain good blower RPM's then you are in business. That said the proper mechanics of the blower must also be realized. Meaning you should have the right belts, pulleys springs and the belts need to be adjusted properly along with the clutch. Anytime you lose mechanical advantage due to some 'other' issue you decrease the efficacy of the blower. So, there is one way when it comes to the single stage blower, that is the factory way - the right way, any jury rigging, or wrong belts, pulleys, springs etc will only serve to cut into the ability of the tractor to blow snow. I used the small wheel Torq last winter and was quite astonished at how well it did. Yes it does have a low range which permitted me to move forward 'slowly' while maintaining engine RPM to 'launch' the snow. The Case/ Ingersolls also have the 'low range' which works out perfectly for snow. Anyone that would leave it in high gear and attempt to just 'drive through' the snow would be trying to launch snow with a spoon. My drive is on a 'slope' and it worked amazingly, I did have to 'add weight' since the blowers are so heavy it gave a forward bias to tractor and lightened up the 'rear end' making 'spinning' of the rear wheels a distinct reality. So, I made a weight bracket and added #235 to the rear end of the tractor, and no more traction issues...

Now the Torq thing...
The Torq is a model of Case tractor that was manufactured in 1974. There are only a handful of these models known to exist in fact I believe the total count is 4. What all the differences are is quite unknown since there were so few made and they are pretty spread out through the country we may never know the exact differences. There are 3 -224 Torq's and 1 -646 Torq. The are pretty close to the 'regular' production 224 and 646 but have distinct nomenclature naming them 'Torq's'. It is a fine working tractor for 100% sure. See the photo of me blowing snow last winter. In fact those photos spurned other Case collectors to get me blowing snow with something else besides the 'Torq'...
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#13 CASENUT ONLINE  

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 06:01 PM

how heres my thing, this case 446 barely blows snow in high range. Case 446 blowing snow - YouTube


In that this is WET snow I'd say it is doing a great job. One additional caveat is you have to make sure not only are the mechanicals leading up to the blower ok, but the auger has an adjustment and a chain, and bearings etc...if it is all in good order, well these are awesome snowblowing machines, which makes them very popular in the snow belt region...

#14 Guest_ACguy1994_*

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 06:14 PM

are the case snowblowers belt driven or shaft or?

#15 CASENUT OFFLINE  

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Posted December 03, 2011 - 07:34 PM

Case has 'mostly' belt driven blowers, although they do have some models that are driven by hydraulics...but the preferred method is belt. They are the most trouble free and cheapest to maintain...




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