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Steel Wheeled Garden Tractors


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#1 Rick OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 09:00 AM

My Dad and I were coming threw Newville Pa. and saw a ford garden tractor with steel wheels.How many of you guys have ever seen this and do you have pics.

#2 chopperfreak2k1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 10:01 AM

thats a new one to me

#3 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 10:11 AM

We used to live in Newville, they are everywhere down there. It is the Mennonites that have them. The story as it was explained to me is they can have powered equipment but it can't be enjoyable to run, mainly on the road otherwise they would use the tractors to run around everywhere if they had rubber tires instead of using their horse and buggies.

The guy that told me was a Mennonite that owns Oakridge Equipment on Oakville Rd. He has a ford 8n and a couple of other machines all with metal wheels.

#4 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 10:12 AM

To my knowledge,Ford did not built a steel wheeled garden tractor.Mind you now,an 8N sized tractor is called a garden tractor,so depending on the size tractor you saw,I suppose it's possible.Ford hasn
t put steel wheels on their tractors since somewhere around the late 30s.

#5 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 10:16 AM

To my knowledge,Ford did not built a steel wheeled garden tractor.


No maker really did except for the real old antiques. These are modern day tractors with steel wheels. The Mennonites have people make them for them so they can use the tractors.

I need to get down that way and take pictures and post em.

#6 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 10:47 AM

These are modern day tractors with steel wheels.

I need to get down that way and take pictures and post em.



Boy I'd like to see some of them,they must look a " little " odd.

#7 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 11:23 AM

There is an advantage.......NO FLATS!!!!! :bigrofl:


#8 Rick OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 01:09 PM

The model ford was a LGT145 just before everything went to Newholland from ford.

#9 Rick OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 01:12 PM

I was told they could own rubber tired tractors until the oldest son joined the church.I'm thinking that ment every tractor had to be in his name.

#10 Rick OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 01:13 PM

They also had a few massey ferguson farm tractors on steel wheels as well.

#11 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 06:14 PM

The Mennonite farmers have their own blacksmith shops that make steel wheels for anything that has an engine in it. I have seen photos of a Case skidsteer with steel wheels all the way around. This is about preserving the traditional ways of Mennonite life and that means using a horse and buggy for travel and not some rubber-tired machine with an internal combustion engine. This is nothing new. It's been going on for many, many years and will continue to do so as long as the church elders have their way.

#12 Rick OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 06:45 PM

The steam engine show in Kinzer PA.in late summer has a pile of these steel wheeled tractors of all sizes.This show is deep in Amish country.I will try and find the show dates and post them.

#13 tractorchick OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2010 - 11:44 PM

WOW! I never thought about that before. I bet it would make for a funky looking lgt.

#14 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted May 13, 2010 - 06:57 AM

This is for Kate.

Steel wheel ban could keep Mennonites from Iowa market | GazetteOnline.com


http://tinyurl.com/28cwreh


http://www.joe.org/j...october/rb8.php


Very few people know anything about the Amish and Mennonite culture. Most people believe that these peace-loving folk live totally in a time-gone-by. If that was absolutely true, then how do you explain the existence of this on-line Amish forum?

http://tinyurl.com/268lmky

Edited by hydriv, May 13, 2010 - 07:09 AM.


#15 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted May 13, 2010 - 07:24 AM

This also may be of interest.


Groffdale Conference Mennonite Church

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Groffdale Conference (Wenger) Mennonite Church is the largest Old Order Mennonite group to use horse-drawn carriages for transportation. Their black carriages distinguish them from the Amish, who use gray ones. They are mainly rural people, using steel-wheeled tractors to work small farms. Along with the automobile, they reject most modern conveniences, while allowing electricity in their homes. Initially concentrated in eastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, they resided in eight other states as of 2002.

Belief and practice
The Groffdale Conference arose in 1927 at the conclusion of a seventeen year disagreement within the Weaverland Old Order Mennonite Conference[over use of the automobile. Half of the Weaverland conference, five hundred of the more traditional members, formed this new group in order to retain horse-drawn transportation. The name of the conference comes from the Groffdale churchhouse where Joseph O. Wenger led the first worship services.

Church members use modern self-propelled farm machinery and lawn mowers that have been refitted with steel wheels. Starting in the 1970s, some farmers used rubber belts and blocks to give wheels more traction, provide a smoother ride and reduce damage to public roads. This practice caused considerable debate within the community, which was resolved in 1999 with a compromise that allows limited use of rubber in the structure of steel wheels. Hard rubber or pneumatic tires are allowed on bicycles and machinery not requiring a driver, such as walk-behind equipment and wagons. Use of steel wheels ensures tractors are not used as a substitute for automobiles to run errands or to make more extensive trips than are convenient with horse-drawn carriages. The steel wheel rule prevents large agricultural operations, reinforcing an emphasis on small farms that provide manual labor for all of the family members.

The German language is used in worship services and Pennsylvania German is spoken at home. They meet in plain church buildings to worship, but do not have Sunday schools. Practicing nonresistance like other traditional Mennonite groups, during World War II they advised young men not qualifying for a farm deferment to accept jail terms instead of Civilian Public Service, the alternate used by other Anabaptist conscientious objectors.

In 1954 the group consisted of 1,200 members. As of 2002, the conference has grown to 49 congregations with 8,542 members and a total population of 17,775. The population has an annual growth rate of 3.7 percent, doubling about every 19 years. About half live in Pennsylvania, with additional congregations in Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Ohio and Wisconsin


For more on this issue, click Horse-and-buggy Mennonites ... - Google Books and scroll down to page 80 "Why Tractor Wheels Matter".




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