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Hydrostatic 2 wheel tractor?


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#31 Lovintractorin OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2011 - 07:52 PM

Had a little time this evening to mess around with engine position. Here's the result. If I did it this way it would leave the back of the engine free for a hydraulic pump or maybe compressor or similar things.

new design einachser4.jpg

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  • new design einachser3 .jpg


#32 Lovintractorin OFFLINE  

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Posted November 27, 2011 - 10:02 AM

Alright so now to find the money and time to make it happen. Might be awhile. I either have time or I have no time. Money is just a dream.

#33 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 01, 2011 - 09:27 AM

This is a concept that has been bouncing around in my head for many years. I lean towards full hydralic's, with a hydro motor with chain reductinon driving each wheel and PTO as well. there are a couple 4 wheel tractors out there doing this. Tuff-bilt for one, based on the AC model G design and the other(I'll let you know when I remeber the name). Ok found it in my favorites, It's Power Trac.
http://power-trac.com/Default.htm
http://www.tuff-bilt.com

Both of these interest me for use on my acreage,and would do well if I could get the finances right.

Edited by JD DANNELS, December 01, 2011 - 09:35 AM.


#34 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2011 - 06:39 AM

Those look like they would be handy in a small acreage farm . My gardden is way too small for that $$$ . I always like the Allis G too . I even thought of making somthing out of a Gravely 4 wheel tractor maybe use just the rear section with a open area in the front like the ones you linked too .

#35 Lovintractorin OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2011 - 08:30 AM

This is a concept that has been bouncing around in my head for many years. I lean towards full hydralic's, with a hydro motor with chain reductinon driving each wheel and PTO as well. there are a couple 4 wheel tractors out there doing this. Tuff-bilt for one, based on the AC model G design and the other(I'll let you know when I remeber the name). Ok found it in my favorites, It's Power Trac.
Versatile Tractors,Compact Tractors,Trailer Packages,Landscaping,Utility Vehicle Rentals,Mowers-Power Trac
Tuff-bilt Tractor System - Affordable and Innovative

Both of these interest me for use on my acreage,and would do well if I could get the finances right.


I seen some guys with the Powertrac and they love them. They look like a neat idea but it doesn't seem like they are for really pulling things. More for running attachments and loader work. But if I could get a PT as well as other tractors and not be in the poor house, that would be the cat's meow.

Now that Tuffbuilt tractor is fantastic. I have been wanting an Allis G for a while but they go for around 3k used around here. That Tuffbuilt looks like it is modeled on the Allis G but with a few improvements as hydraulic drive which would be really nice, but pricey to repair and not as bullet proof as the old gear drive, and mid and rear 3 point hitch would be really nice. Would be great to test drive that Tuffbuilt to see how it performs.

Full hydraulics would be great but expensive thus I don't normally think along those lines. That was the reason I was thinking of using a rear end from a GT but it would not be a as flexible design in regards to ground speed modifications and other things.

#36 Lovintractorin OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2011 - 08:32 AM

Those look like they would be handy in a small acreage farm . My gardden is way too small for that $$$ . I always like the Allis G too . I even thought of making somthing out of a Gravely 4 wheel tractor maybe use just the rear section with a open area in the front like the ones you linked too .


That's an idea. Wonder how the Gravely would perform. Never driven one or even seen one in person. Might be able to put larger tires on it if it were geared low enough to get better ground clearance.

#37 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2011 - 08:41 AM

I've seen Gravelys the on CL but never used one either . Maybe the Gravely guys will post some info , Al

Never driven one or even seen one in person. Might be able to put larger tires on it if it were geared low enough to get better ground clearance.



#38 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2011 - 09:25 AM

There are a number of video's on You Tube of the Tuff-built in action. I think I googled "Farming with Tuff-Bilt Tractor"?
Last year I tilled 5,000 Sq ft for our garden with my Troy Bilt Super Bronco, Jo say's she wants to double the size next year.
Have 8.9 acres I want to put in produce production and orchard to supplement my income in retirement.
This is big row crop country and I've never seen either machine in use in this area.
Though there is a testimonial on the Power Trac site from a nursery in Ceder Rapids(about 80 miles away).

LovinTractors, I don't think Hydralic power is any more expensive to build than mechanical drive and a lot less mechanically complicated.
I just think one needs to change his mindset. Granted the plumbing takes some thought, but in this area it is not at all hard to get hoses and plumbing custom made. There are many shops that have the equipment to custom make hydralic lines to get a farmer back in the field with same day service.
The worst Hydralic repair I ever made was not hydralic at all. It was repairing the drive chain on a Case 830 skid-loader.
And even though I have small hands I had to grease my hand to squeeze it through the access port (still took off some hide doing it) to put new connecting links in the chain.

I would like to have a Gravely, but for some reason they are very rare in this area. I think it was on this site, someone posted pictures of a Gravely with a China Diesel repower, and I think that would be the Cat's Meow.

#39 Lovintractorin OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2011 - 09:40 AM

You are probably right about the hydraulics. I have not had any real good experiences with them. The only work I did on hydraulics was a very expensive repair, involving 2 ft 300 dollar hoses and having to send the hydraulic pump to England to be rebuilt. That's why I think they are expensive.

#40 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 02, 2011 - 10:21 AM

You are probably right about the hydraulics. I have not had any real good experiences with them. The only work I did on hydraulics was a very expensive repair, involving 2 ft 300 dollar hoses and having to send the hydraulic pump to England to be rebuilt. That's why I think they are expensive.


I'm not saying Hydralic is cheap, but not being a Machinest or have a family member or friend who has a machine shop.
And with the fact that any machineshop worth it's salt that will do my size jobs, having a two week- a months lead time in this area.
I consider the hydralic's mechanical simplicity to be a benefit and affordable.




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