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Waste oil burner + photos


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#1 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 04:06 PM

There is nothing pretty about this oil burner. But I am able to work in my uninsulated shop in shirt sleeves when it is below zero outside. I've been asked for information about the burner that I built so I will try and show what I'm using. If you have any questions feel free to ask.
I believe in the "KISS" theory and with dirty waste oil this is important. I don't filter my oil but I do drain off as much water as I can. I try to stay with used motor oil as gear lubes can get pretty thick in the winter.
In the first photo below is the old fire pot and the new pre-heat and primary burner. The three legged burner sets in the fire pot. The waste oil drips into this and is heated to the flash point and is where the first combustion takes place. Excess oil runs down the legs and into the fire pot where it is burned off and keeps the primary burner hot.
The third picture is with the prototype primary burner shown. The small 1/4" holes in the side kept plugging and had to be cleaned each day.

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Edited by Cvans, October 27, 2011 - 05:17 PM.

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#2 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 04:20 PM

Neat setup :thumbs:
I would like to see some pictures and possibly a short video of it in action.

#3 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 04:21 PM

Simple looking. I have a son-in-law with a waste oil burner in his shop on the farm. Does a great job. He also has the floor heated.

#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 04:21 PM

I don't quite get how it works but I am not familiar with them at all. How do you feed the oil in to it and how do you vent the fumes / smoke are 2 questions I have.

#5 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 04:26 PM

I had the same feed question, but Brian beat me to it. I'd also like to see it in action when you get the chance.

#6 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 04:33 PM

In these photo's you will see the lighting of the burner, the blower and the actual fire.

I purchased the the surplus blower for about $10.00 and is out of some kind of Zerox machine. It is 115 volt and 17 watts. Something in the neighbor hood of 25 cfm should work fine. I folded a piece of light sheet metal to adapt it to the flexible exhaust pipe. The blower just sets on the floor and for some reason no one has tripped over it. I suppose the hot stove keeps them away. I had a 115 volt Hi-pot setting around so I hooked the fan to that to control it's output. You might be able to use a light dimmer for the same thing but I haven't tried that. It's better to run the blower at slow speed until the burner is up to operating temperature.

I use and small weed burner that I built for heating aluminum to start the fire. A regular propane torch could be used but will take a little longer. If you don't use too heavy materials for building the burner it doesn't take ling to get up to burning temperatures. I usually heat the top first and when it is burning heat the bottom. The bottom will start on it's own but takes a while.

The third photo shows the burner in operation. Notice that there is very little smoke. If I had taken the photo closer you would be able to see way back in the stove. If running the burner at low temps. just the top burner is working. As you turn up the oil flow the bottom burner comes on line. It seems to work the best when there is just enough oil carry over to keep a thin film of oil burning in the bottom of the bottom fire pot. The blower burner combinations sounds similar to a small jet engine. Close the door and it's not really noticeable.

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#7 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 04:34 PM

You guys are tooooooo fast for this old mans fingers. There is more coming and then it should be as clear as mud.:smile1:

#8 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 04:58 PM

Good looking set up.

#9 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 05:07 PM

These two photos show how I control the oil flow and the plumbing. Ugly!
First is the 1/2" ball valve to stop the flow. Next is a fine threaded 3/8" metering valve. This is very important as a small change in the flow creates a huge difference in the burn rate. Don't be tempted to leave this out unless you want to burn your shop down!!!!
These are mounted to a 50 lb. freon tank that is mounted to the side of the top barrel. This is the oil reservoir. I have a sludge, water drain in the bottom and the oil feed line extends up into the oil a couple of inches to keep out any water or crud that gets into the reservoir. I think this tank holds about 7 gallons and is enough to last a long day in the shop even when it is below zero outside. As the oil warms you will need to turn down the metering valve.

You can see that there isn't much smoke coming from the tail pipe.

When starting on a cold morning I open both valves all the way and put a "LITTLE" air pressure in the tank to get the thick oil to start flowing. This is done through the vent hole 2" pipe cap on my filler opening.
I know this is starting to sound a little complicated but it only takes me about 5 minutes to start the stove in the morning and being a double barrel stove it is heating in short order. I usually fill two 2 1/2 gallon oil jugs to refill the reservoir in the evening before I close up for the night. A lot easier to do when the shop is warm.
I have been using this same barrel stove for 30 years. Original barrels. I think I paid $19.00 for the kit at TSC and has turned out to be a very good investment. Just remember to keep the stove a safe distance from anything combustible. This waste oil burner is something that I have developed over a number of years. If you choose to reproduce any part of it for your use, you do so at your own risk.
Be safe.

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Edited by Cvans, October 27, 2011 - 06:20 PM.

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#10 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 06:51 PM

Thanks for the pictures and explanation Chris. You must have a good supply of used oil if you go through several gallons a day.

#11 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 07:07 PM

Chris, what are the diameter's of the burners? Looks like a nice set-up for heat. I know the 'store bought' large ones work very well. This seems to be quite simple in design. Hardest part is getting the drip set just right. Thanks for the enlightenment on this.

#12 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 09:18 PM

Thanks, that is an interesting design. Never seen it before.

#13 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 09:24 PM

The top burner is a 3" schedule 40 pipe by 2 1/2" deep. The bottom burner is 7 or 8" auger tubing about the same depth. The legs were 5/8" rod 4" long. There are 6 one inch holes around the outside of the 3" pipe. None of this is written in stone. I used what I had for the whole burner.

The oil consumption sounds high but keep in mind that this is an old building and the over head door is a cheap single layer fiber glass door. Within the next two weeks I will be installing an insulated door which should help. On the average during above zero weather I use around 2 1/2 to 3 gallons for a day. Yes I have a good supply of oil and I hope that doesn't change in the near future.

Once the shop and the stove reach normal temperature there isn't much monkeying with the flow control. If I leave the shop I usually turn the valve down to about 3/4 turn open and it stays comfortable while I'm gone.

Edited by Cvans, October 27, 2011 - 09:29 PM.

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#14 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted November 03, 2011 - 08:24 PM

Just got in and found your burner.
Nice setup. I now understand what you are doing. It is kind of like a nuclear reaction. More fuel lots more heat. Less fuel temps drop and things can get smokey. I did this for many years and now use a Black Gold burner in a wood boiler. Now it can take care of it self and also heat my house.
I will do some pics next chance I get.

#15 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted November 03, 2011 - 11:07 PM

With this burner things actually work in reverse. Too little oil and all that happens is the shop gets cold. Too much oil and the stove starts chugging and black smoke like you wouldn't believe. I was going to use a thermal expansion valve on the oil feed but this has worked OK so I Left it. Don't think I would trust it in the house though.
Looking forward to the photos.
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