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Blueberry Question?


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#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 08:30 AM

The wife and I were talking last night and the blue berries and Manchurian Apricot are just getting started good. They are about a 1 ft to 1.5 ft high, and I'm concerned that rabbits might chew them off this winter. I was thinking of putting the styrofoam cones used for roses over them for the winter. Anybody done this or have ideas?

#2 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2011 - 10:46 AM

We have a similar problem only it is the deer:confuse: who get to our blueberries. We wrap the young ones with burlap after a good freeze. I would think the cones would work OK too.

#3 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2011 - 10:20 PM

It was a long time ago when we planted blueberries but I think the neighbors dogs kept the rabbits away those years now there about 6' high , I guess any protection would be good , how about chicken wire ? Then you could leave it around the plant until it's bigger . Al

#4 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2011 - 10:26 PM

This helps keep the rabbits away too
http://gardentractor...en-helper-6619/:bigrofl:

#5 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2011 - 11:10 PM

I would put something around them. Rabbits got 2 out of three last year. I am putting wire around mine.

#6 1978murray OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2011 - 07:50 AM

we put mesh over ours all year round. It keeps the deer and other animals out

#7 afraidcrrazy OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2011 - 03:44 AM

Home Gardening: Everybody loves blueberries! We have often wondered how you can grow your own blueberries to enjoy this sweet during the summer months! Your best resource for horticultural information in your area is the Cooperative Extension Service County or the agent. You can also search your local yellow pages and locate nurseries near you who are well informed of the blueberries. Good luck and hope this whets your appetite at the head of production and the frozen food section during the months of the year your blueberries are in season.
BlueberryGrowing Essentials:


Sunlight - Fruits need a lot of sunlight, every time you start to branch or bush.


Soil - Almost all fruits better in slightly acidic soils, somewhere between pH 5.5 and 6.5. Blueberries prefer acidic soil increased from 4.09 to 5.0.


Drainage - Adequate drainage is important. Find a suitable place, avoiding low-lying areas or water collection are slow to drain in the spring.


Pollination - Most fruit trees, blueberries have included male and female organs in the same flower, but not all are self-pollinating. The best option for blueberries is that different varieties of blueberries within 100 feet, so that bees can travel and cross-pollination. Blueberries can not be fertilized by its own pollen!
Starting Right with Blueberries
Blueberries bring a unique combination of delicious fruit and striking ornamental beauty in the garden and landscape. Blueberries are easy to grow, require little care, and are rarely bothered by pests. If some basic steps are followed your blueberry plants can thrive and last a lifetime.
Varieties
Blueberry varieties are distinguished by their ability of weather and time of ripening. Be sure to choose varieties adapted to your area. You may want to select varieties that ripen at different times or feature large fruit (best for fresh eating and desserts) or small fruit (best for muffins and pancakes). Brightly colored shrubs or collapse of the different growth habits offer the gardener lots of choices for use in the landscape. For blueberry lovers, allow at least two plants for each family member.
Selection and preparation
Select a sunny location in well drained soil free of weeds and worked well. Locate in an area where irrigation water is available as best results are obtained by keeping the root zone moist throughout the growing season. Where soil drainage is poor or marginal, beds 3-4 feet wide and 12. 8 "high work very well for blueberries.
A failsafe way to grow blueberries in almost any soil is the addition of peat in the planting medium. For planting directly into the ground, the work of a planting area approximately 2-1/2 feet in diameter and one meter deep. Remove 1 / 3 to 1 / 2 of the earth. Add the same amount of pre-moistened peat moss and mix well. A bale of compressed 4 cubic feet is usually enough for 4-5 plants for raised beds mix equal volumes of peat compost or potting mix acid. Blueberries grow in acidic soils. Your garden center representative can recommend a soil acidifier if necessary for your area.
Spacing - Blueberries can be planted as close as 2-1/2 feet apart to form solid hedges or space for up to 6 feet away and grown as individual specimens. If planted in rows, allow 10. 8 feet between rows depending on the equipment used to cut or cultivar.

Planting - For container stock, remove from pot and lightly roughen the outer surface of the root ball. Set the top line of the ground floor of 2.1 inches taller than the existing ground and firm around the root ball. Mound soil up along sides of exposed root mass. Irrigation also. For bare root plants, the roots spread wide and shallow, covered with 1 / 2 "of soil. Soil around the roots firmly and well water.

Mulching - Cranberries better with a 2-4 "mulch over the roots to conserve moisture, prevent weeds and add organic matter bark mulch, compost acid cuts sawdust, grass, etc. work well repeat every two years ...
Pruning - It is important that blueberries are established before allowing them to bear fruit. Since then, should be pruned heavily each year to avoid over fruiting resulting in the growth of small or poor.
Remove all the flowers first appear. year. In later years, follow these steps after the leaves have fallen.
Remove low growth around the base. If it does grow, they are pruned out!
Remove dead wood, and vigorous twiggy wood. Select brightly colored wood with a long (at least 3 inches) side. Remove stains from growth in the short color.
If 1 / 3 to 1 / 2 of the wood has not been removed by the previous steps, dilute fruit sides and small branches until this balance has been obtained.
Fertilization - Blueberries like acid fertilizers such as Rhody or Azalea formulations. For newly planted stock, use 2 tablespoons of 20.10. 10 (or similar fertilizer) in late spring or once plants are established. (Caution: Blueberries are very sensitive to fertilizer, more!) For subsequent years, use 1 ounce of fertilizer for each year from planting to a total of 8 ounces per plant. Apply in early spring and again in late spring for best results. Always water after fertilizing.
Organic fertilizers, blood meal and cottonseed meal and work. Avoid using fresh manure.

Edited by powerking56, November 08, 2011 - 06:56 AM.
improper link

  • JD DANNELS said thank you

#8 cookiemonster OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2011 - 07:27 AM

Gosh, I'm out of touch. I thought this was going to be a question about blackberries (phone)... which I got one of those. No help on the blueberries, but it's interesting reading. Gardening is on my to-do list for retirement and I've started collecting the stuff I need to do it. Though it's a few decades into the future. And if I don't start doing a little better about saving for retirement, I may need to put a little "cash crop" in the middle of the garden - surrounded by sweet corn - to make ends meet then.

#9 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2011 - 07:38 AM

Gosh, I'm out of touch. I thought this was going to be a question about blackberries (phone)... which I got one of those. No help on the blueberries, but it's interesting reading. Gardening is on my to-do list for retirement and I've started collecting the stuff I need to do it. Though it's a few decades into the future. And if I don't start doing a little better about saving for retirement, I may need to put a little "cash crop" in the middle of the garden - surrounded by sweet corn - to make ends meet then.

:bigrofl::bigrofl::bigrofl:

#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2011 - 11:34 AM

Good Post Cookiemonster!! Unlike you, Retirement is not DECADES AWAY for me. And I have every intention of making a cash crop a part of my gardening to supplement my income in retirement.

Your handle makes me laugh. When my daughter was very small she had a stuffed cookiemonster as big or bigger than her thar was her constant companion.
I can't think of it without laughing about the time she shared her chips and dip with cookie monster. Mom had a heck of a time cleaning the dip up.

#11 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted November 09, 2011 - 09:46 PM

Gosh, I'm out of touch. I thought this was going to be a question about blackberries (phone)... which I got one of those. No help on the blueberries, but it's interesting reading. Gardening is on my to-do list for retirement and I've started collecting the stuff I need to do it. Though it's a few decades into the future. And if I don't start doing a little better about saving for retirement, I may need to put a little "cash crop" in the middle of the garden - surrounded by sweet corn - to make ends meet then.

Thanks for the chuckle.:smiley-score010:




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