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Implement mounting pins


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#1 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2011 - 04:40 PM

Does anyone know a source for pins like the one below, but in different lengths?

The longer ones I have for mounting the snowcaster, etc. are all 'square ended'. I've found that the tapered ones make installing those pins a lot easier since you don't have to have the holes on the implement and mounting tabs perfectly lined up. Get them close, and a tap or two with a hammer and the tapered ones slide right in.

Unfortunately the tapered ones I have are too short. Took me over a 1/2 hour to get the second pin installed on the snow caster today :mad2:

Attached Thumbnails

  • 100_4045.jpg


#2 bhts OFFLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2011 - 05:23 PM

I have alot of different ones what size are you looking for or a part number will help.

#3 LPBolens OFFLINE  

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Posted October 24, 2011 - 10:11 PM

I have never found a reasonably priced source for the original style tapered end clevis pins, so I buy the square shouldered ones and taper them myself on my bench grinder. Maybe not as pretty as manufactured ones, but they work fine!

#4 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 25, 2011 - 05:32 AM

Yeah they are pretty expensive.
Right around $10 each For the long ones

#5 Lovintractorin OFFLINE  

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Posted October 25, 2011 - 05:51 AM

We make ours from the smooth part on a large bolt. I have a bunch a the right sized bolts sitting around so it is pretty easy. They aren't original but they work great. Slide them in till the head's against the mounting tap and drill a hole for a hair pin clip and they are prefect. Mine aren't tapered but I should do it cause it is a pain to get the implements perfectly aligned.

#6 Macgyver OFFLINE  

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Posted October 25, 2011 - 07:39 PM

I will check the old tractor shop up the street from me this weekend,I thought I saw some there and let you know

#7 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted October 25, 2011 - 11:09 PM

If I had a lathe, or access to one, I'd be interested in trying to make an "installation tool", similar to the pic below. It would have the same taper that the one in my first pic, but maybe extended a bit.

Then a bit of a taper on the other end so it could be hit with a hammer and still fit in the holes.

Once you have it in the holes, you could "push" it out with a square shouldered pin.

That would allow you to use the easily found/cheaper pins, and still have an easier way of getting them installed.

PIC is a bit crude, just a quickie in MS Paint.

install_pin.jpg

#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2011 - 04:11 AM

Good idea for the alignment tool. You should be able to make one of those tools with a drill press and an angle grinder. Just chuck some round stock in the drill press and start it spinning at a good speed and use the angle grinder to make the taper. When it gets close to what you want switch to a file and finish it off. Sand if you want it really smooth. You really wouldn't need the accuracy of a lathe for something like this.

#9 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2011 - 04:30 AM

Brian, you would need a good sized chuck to do that. Most pins are at least 5/8", some 3/4". My drill press only goes to 1/2". But I have 'turned' a few smaller sized things doing this. I usually turn the part at a high speed and use the air die grinder. Does a great job. If you want it really smooth, use the scotch brite pads at the end.

#10 Lovintractorin OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2011 - 05:12 AM

What if you welded a small bolt or rod to the end of it that would fit in a 1/2 inch chuck and just cut it off when done. If you don't have access to a welder you could drill a hole and epoxy or JB weld the small pin in the hole, and cut if off flush when done. Just switch the belts around to make the drill press spin at a high speed.

#11 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2011 - 06:38 PM

My drill press is 5/8". I didn't realize the pins would be larger than 1/2". I have even used a file and a drill press to flatten out worn commutators on DC motors. It's not the best way to do it by far but i have used it when there was no other alternative available. I like to try to find ways to get things done using what I have on hand. You could always use a bench grinder to angle a pin as well.

#12 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2011 - 07:18 PM

The bench grinder method is actually quite accurate for this job, not much different than sharpening a drill bit on that same bench grinder. Follow it up with a piece of emery cloth sandpaper if you want it smooth. I buy the universal style mounting pins that have holes in them every 1/4 inch and taper them if I want them to go in easily. Just remember to buy longer pins lol.

#13 Macgyver OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2011 - 03:17 PM

Sorry Buzz,I struckout at the tractor shop up the road from me today

#14 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2011 - 03:34 PM

The bench grinder method is actually quite accurate for this job, not much different than sharpening a drill bit on that same bench grinder. Follow it up with a piece of emery cloth sandpaper if you want it smooth. I buy the universal style mounting pins that have holes in them every 1/4 inch and taper them if I want them to go in easily. Just remember to buy longer pins lol.


I guess you'd have to watch out for situations where a longer pin is going to interfere with something. From experience I know of a couple of situations where that can happen and it can be an unpleasant surprise when it fetches up.
I actually have a mini lathe that I can use to do some small machining jobs, but like you said it isn't necessary for a job like this. Much easier and faster just to use a grinder.




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