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Welded oil pan


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#1 poncho62 ONLINE  

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Posted October 11, 2011 - 03:20 PM

I have 3 LGTs...all have the welded to frame oil pans...I have never changed an engine in these until this week...I did 2.....I have decided that this weld oil pan thing was NOT a good idea......Try lowering a 100 lb engine into your frame while trying to keep that gasket aligned........I hate it

rant over
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#2 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 11, 2011 - 03:25 PM

I've never understood their thinking on that one!

#3 mikebramel OFFLINE  

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Posted October 11, 2011 - 04:13 PM

Studs

#4 nra1ifer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 11, 2011 - 04:35 PM

Wow..... sounds fun (NOT!!!)

#5 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted October 11, 2011 - 04:40 PM

No,I never understood that either.

#6 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 11, 2011 - 05:09 PM

I'm glad mine is not like that. The open sides may look a little better, but that is one issue I'll pass on.

#7 Tennblue59 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2011 - 10:00 AM

What a weird idea! What do you do if the pan's gasket surface gets damaged? (Never seen one of these - just developing an interest in Fords..). Can you grind out the welds and get the pan out? If you did, how would you replace it in the tractor? Weld a new one in, or adapt something with tabs?

#8 Tennblue59 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2011 - 10:02 AM

Wow! light just went on!!! Somebody gave me a kohler engine a while back, but there was no oil pan with it. Bet I know now what it came out of!!!!!!

#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2011 - 10:19 AM

I can't say I understand the thinking on that either. My best guess was some engineer right out of school, decided a unitized chassis using the engine as part of the frame structure would make for a stiffer chassis(it probably does?).
At the time they were built engineers were experimenting with that in racing cars.
One of "Ford's Better Idea's" that did not pan out(no pun intended).

I think Mike has a good idea, use studs and set the the gasket on the pan and lower the engine onto the pan.
Would work fine till you run into the rod through the pan situation comes up. Then you would have to weld in a new pan.

Another trick my father-in-law taught me many years ago to keep pesky gaskets in place.
Was to use light wire(a strand of copper wire from an old dropcord) to tie the gasket through the bolt holes.

Many of you may be already doing this, but thought I would pass it along.

Edited by JD DANNELS, October 14, 2011 - 10:55 AM.

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#10 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2011 - 10:54 AM

The welded in pan is actually the front axle support as well. So to remove it you need to also build a new axle support . This casting us substantial to say the least, it is very rugged , and makes a very sought frame, don't be scared , it works very well and holds a lot of oil.

#11 fxdb96 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2015 - 08:15 AM

Will any K321 bolt up to a machine with the welded pan?  Even if it came from a machine with a non welded pan?



#12 poncho62 ONLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2015 - 08:34 PM

Will any K321 bolt up to a machine with the welded pan?  Even if it came from a machine with a non welded pan?

Depends...some Kohlers are different, wide and narrow blocks, if I remember correctly



#13 fxdb96 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2015 - 09:05 PM

Depends...some Kohlers are different, wide and narrow blocks, if I remember correctly

I think you are right poncho62.  a narrow block with a regular pan should work with my welded in pan!



#14 RAJ OFFLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2015 - 10:46 PM

Last summer at a show in Portage, WI,  I talked with a guy that used to work for Jacobsen Mfg. in Racine. For what it's worth, he said that when they were developing the new tube-frame tractors with the welded oil pan, one way the engineers tested frame/pan durability was running the tractor into a brick wall wide open. He also said extreme condition testing was done on the hydro transmissions and they were found to be virtually bulletproof. These tractors had a weakness in their fiberglass grilles and steering components, but were otherwise built very tough - just like most garden tractors of the day, I suppose.


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#15 fxdb96 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 02, 2015 - 05:55 AM

Last summer at a show in Portage, WI,  I talked with a guy that used to work for Jacobsen Mfg. in Racine. For what it's worth, he said that when they were developing the new tube-frame tractors with the welded oil pan, one way the engineers tested frame/pan durability was running the tractor into a brick wall wide open. He also said extreme condition testing was done on the hydro transmissions and they were found to be virtually bulletproof. These tractors had a weakness in their fiberglass grilles and steering components, but were otherwise built very tough - just like most garden tractors of the day, I suppose.

Very cool!






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