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Painting david bradley implements


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#1 sacsr OFFLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2011 - 08:42 AM

Well after 3 days using the electrolysis tank with easy little stuff like 3pt arms etc....I am moving on to the david bradley planter.....it is rusty and I want to preserve it the best I can....so I am thinking all the parts should be okay to put in the tank (except the one with the aluminum tag) right??? Only concern I had was the fertilizer hopper.....was not sure if it would have been galanized or tin.....just don't want to mess it up.

Also what is the 'correct' paint color........if it was not painted at all.....leaning toward black.....just figuring a coat of paint will make it last longer.......but don't want to take away from the resale value.....

Your thoughts??

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#2 Lauber1 ONLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2011 - 10:43 PM

dont know what tag you have but the early DB tagged ones were electric blue, the later black tagged Sears/Simpson ones were white or an off white cream color. One that has a red sears tag would have been white. Dont know what the tag looks like for the late model ones but the seeder was black.

The only part id watch is the bushings for the drive axil as some where die cast, and older diecast sometime dont like being messed with. The fert box was plain steel so you wont hurt it and will probally help it out. Just remember to take all the stuff apart or the rust will come back from in between the bolts parts. The chain would have been either black, or bare dipped in varnish. I sand blast all my stuff, so the dipping isnt an issue here.
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#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 09, 2011 - 07:16 AM

Thanks Lauber1, that's good info for (if) I ever find one to restore.

My dad has a lot of older farm stuff that is part wood, part bare metal. He has found a great way to preserve both at the same time. 4 parts turpentine to 1 pt boiled linseed oil. Takes a long time to cure up, but when it does, it has a patina and protection. We usually give 2 coats to the metal, and the old wood we shoot until it stops soaking in, 30 min between coats on a hot, dry day.
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#4 rammer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2011 - 09:59 AM

sacsr,
my questions are about using the electrolysis method.
. did you use the instructions from the article on this site.
. was it easy (my wife says sometimes i'm not too smart)
. are you pleased with the results.
thanks
tom(rammer)

#5 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2011 - 10:22 AM

sacsr,
my questions are about using the electrolysis method.
. did you use the instructions from the article on this site.
. was it easy (my wife says sometimes i'm not too smart)
. are you pleased with the results.
thanks
tom(rammer)


The article spells it out well enough that even I did it.
Things I learned thru experimentation: surface area is your friend.
The positive lead is where all the bad stuff goes. The more surface area here, the faster the process. I have switched to lining the inside of the tub with unpainted sheet metal. I work for an appliance store and have found the cabinets of old washers or dryers have little or no paint on the inside. Get it for free.
Water temp is also a biggie. If you have a heated area to put the tub, I highly advise it. The warmer it is, the better the electrolysis will work.
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