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Welding cast iron?


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#1 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 08:49 AM

I know I remember someone posting about it but is there a special way to weld cast iron? The front roller on the mower deck to the Cub 147 broke. Basically the left bracket broke. I had seen it was cracked before I unloaded it when I bought it. I don't know if hit cracked when we loaded it or what. Anyway when I took the deck off to take the 147 to the one show the bracket broke all the way through. I am going to try working on it tonight and getting it cleaned up and ready to weld.

#2 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 08:55 AM

I forget what kind of rod has to be used, but I know the process involve pre-heating with a torch, and then slowly cooling it after the weld with the torch. Thats done to prevent cracking.

#3 chopperfreak2k1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 09:27 AM

i could be wrong, but i believe you must use nickel rod to weld cast iron.

#4 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 10:59 AM

I forget what kind of rod has to be used, but I know the process involve pre-heating with a torch, and then slowly cooling it after the weld with the torch. Thats done to prevent cracking.

:ditto:
And I use Ni-rod ( spelling ? ) for welding cast.

#5 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 12:39 PM

Yep, use Ni-rod (nickel). Best by far to preheat the entire piece, but heating with a torch will do. Not white-hot, but good & "spit-ball" heat. Weld no more than 1" at a time, then heat the part with toch again. Repeat until all welded, then re-heat all over & wrap in a few layers of house insulation. I've done this many times & the next morning the part is sometimes still warm. Another way is after finished welding, simply toss the piece into a woodstove fire. Letting it cool slowly as the fire dies down.
Grind V into the weld area as usual. Ni rod flows really well as it penetrates, but if there are contaminants, & you see blister holes in the weld, grind out & re-weld. Almost always, the 2nd weld is clean, as the 1st weld burned up the crud. This part should weld good, as it won't be soaked in oil like an engine block. With any part that has been around oil/grease, it is best to put the part in a fire before attempting welding to raise the oils from the metal.
  • IamSherwood said thank you

#6 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 01:09 PM

I will have to see how this goes as I don't have an arc welder. I just have my hobart 140 and I think I have stainless flux cored wire in it now. I guess I can unbolt the front plate off the deck and reweld it and then put that piece in the oven let it slowly cool off.

#7 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 02:10 PM

George, stainless works with cast iron too! Main thing is clean, clean, clean, then heat, weld, heat weld, heat, then sloooow cool. Likely need around 110 to 120 amps, at least that's with stick. Never used stainless in my MIG welders.

#8 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 02:16 PM

George, stainless works with cast iron too! Main thing is clean, clean, clean, then heat, weld, heat weld, heat, then sloooow cool. Likely need around 110 to 120 amps, at least that's with stick. Never used stainless in my MIG welders.


I agree with Daniel. Oh and stainless steel works good in the mig.

#9 Raspy OFFLINE  

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Posted May 02, 2010 - 02:39 PM

I used to weld cast iron bailer needles back together on a regular basis. They'd break into several pieces and I'd weld them with nirod (sp). I also recently welded some cast iron with my favorite rod of all time, 309/316 stainless. It works wonders on many things. Some iron pieces, like engine blocks, are very hard to weld without cracking because they are a complicated shape.

High nickel content is the key with iron. It also works well on very hard steel, like farm disks, that wants to crystalize with the heat.

I use 309/316 on mild steel too, both with stick and mig. Good stuff! Run it with AC.

#10 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted May 02, 2010 - 03:11 PM

I used to weld cast iron bailer needles back together on a regular basis.


Yep, broke a set of those needles before my Dad told me to reset the tie mechanism. We used to custom square bale all over the county MANY years ago, before roll balers came along. My first few solo outings with the baler were interesting! LOL

#11 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted May 04, 2010 - 03:03 PM

I got the piece welded up. I made sure I cleaned it real good with the grinder and beveled the edges. It was about a 1/4" thick and I had a little propane torch and I used that to preheat the best I could and then I did small tack welds with good penetration to get it warm and then finished it out and used the torch a little to help slow it down to not cool too fast but it was about the best I could do. Considering I don't think a 42" mower deck will fit in the oven and I was too lazy to take the whole front piece off LOL. It turned out pretty good and the welder and stainless wire did pretty good. I don't think I will have any trouble with it.

#12 Big John OFFLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2011 - 12:22 PM

Tips for welding cast iron. All of the above tips are good, especially the preheating. If you buy speciall
cast iron stick rods, there are 2 kinds of rods, one is soft & can be machined, the other is hard & will
eat the point right off of a drill bit!
Big John.

#13 101 senior ONLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2011 - 03:26 PM

I was taught that when wielding cast to drill a hole at each end of the crack, to prevent spread. Then wield. You can check w your local wielding shop as to rod type. Hope that helps.

#14 tweidman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 14, 2011 - 03:34 PM

It will be interesting to see if it holds up. The only cast welding I have done was with a arc welder and high nickle rod. I had a helper on the torch while welding. It worked great. Good luck.

#15 petepete OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2011 - 04:24 PM

I was taught by Dad to pean weld bead while it cools to relieve stresses to prevent cracks. Anyone else do this or did I just dream this up?




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