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Flat tire. Tube? Slime or New tire?


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#1 MaintenanceMan OFFLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2010 - 07:22 AM

Ok so the MF12 has been home in the shed for about three days and three out of the four tires seem to be holding air ok. The left front though as some pretty nasty looking cracks in the side wall and I was wondering if I could put a tube in it for a cheaper longer lasting fix or I had thought about using that slime stuff. I really don't want to put a new tire on it if I don't have to. Can you run an inner tube in these tires and what size would I need?
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Edited by MaintenanceMan, April 29, 2010 - 05:37 AM.


#2 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2010 - 07:54 AM

If you think the tire is sound enough that it isn't going to blow out any time soon, I would put a tube in it. When you go to buy a tube tell them the size of the tire and that is what they go by. If you think the tire is getting to far gone I would replace it and put a tube in it.When I put new tires on one of my projects I still put in a new tube also. I have not had any problems with tires that I have done that to. Some of the rims I reuse have rust pitting along where the tire bead is supposed to seal. Even with sanding and painting the rims they could still leak slowly at the bead area. By putting tubes in you eleminate that problem. I have never tried slime or other products like that. Some have had good luck using it but I just do it the old fashioned way and don't have to worry about it again.
  • Sawdust said thank you

#3 MaintenanceMan OFFLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2010 - 08:17 AM

If you think the tire is sound enough that it isn't going to blow out any time soon, I would put a tube in it.


The tire as far as tread wise doesn't seem to have that much wear on it but if anything there might be a little dry rot going on. I think I will try a tube just because I have never used slime and don't think that would really do what I need it to.

#4 poncho62 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2010 - 08:19 AM

That slime rarely works with cracked tires...its mainly for rim leaks.

#5 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2010 - 10:49 AM

That slime rarely works with cracked tires...its mainly for rim leaks.


and punctures it does alright with but that stuff is nasty.

I would put a new tire on, the tires can be had for about $40 and depending if that is the original tire or not you may have a heck of a time getting it off the rim. I had to take mine to a tire shop to get them done.

#6 chopperfreak2k1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2010 - 02:40 PM

i use slime for everything - tubes, tubeless, bicycle tires, tractor tires, car and truck tires too. as long as it's a smallish leak it will plug it up.

#7 Guest_hooligan_*

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Posted April 28, 2010 - 10:31 PM

Tubes around here run around 10 bucks, that's half the cost of a cheap tire, but don't listen to me, I like buying tires, good tires, I spent well over 600 on new tires in the last couple months still have a few more sets to go

#8 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 08:36 AM

On one with sidewall cracking like this one, I'd replace tire rather than tube. Old tires are such a hassle to get off, so if having it broken loose to tube, it'd be best to go ahead & replace it....in my opinion. But then it's not my money nor time, so do what works for you.

#9 MaintenanceMan ONLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 09:53 AM

I think I am going to get it running first and hope it holds air long enough to tow my seeder then go after a new tire. I think there is a tire place not too far from my house that my dad got the tires for my sears tractor a few years ago so I will see if they are still around and give them a try. The gas tank is pretty rusty so I was going to have my grandpa help me coat the inside because he has done a few. I am also going to put a shut off and an in line fuel filter in to help. The exhaust is kind of hanging me up too at the moment. In order to put my stack on I have to get a longer pipe coming out of the block and right now the one that is in there must be original becuase it will not budge. It has been soaking in some penetrating oil for a few days and I have tried heat from a mapp gas torch and nothing.

#10 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 10:15 AM

Those exhaust nipples can be a bugger to get out. If it won't budge one thing I have done before is to take a saws all or a jigsaw with a small metal blade that isn't much longer then the amount of pipe threaded inside the head. First cut the nipple off to within about an inch of the head (enough to still get a pipe wrench on it) and then use the saw to cut the inside of the pipe like you are trying to score it. Which is basically what you are trying to do, just don't go too deep, go a little at a time, if you do hit the threads it will be alright because it isn't a "critical fit" and once you have it scored the length of the pipe then take a chisel or punch and to one side or the other of the score line where the pipe is still sticking out punch it inwards towards the center of the pipe. It will probably be easier to make the score line at the top of the pipe and if you have to you can always make more score lines. Keep punching it towards the center, hopefully it is starting to tear away from the other part of the pipe and once you get a decent amount bent in then try the pipe wrench on it again.

Hopefully what I just typed makes sense, it would be a lot easier to show then tell LOL

#11 MaintenanceMan OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 01:42 PM

Those exhaust nipples can be a bugger to get out. If it won't budge one thing I have done before is to take a saws all or a jigsaw with a small metal blade that isn't much longer then the amount of pipe threaded inside the head. First cut the nipple off to within about an inch of the head (enough to still get a pipe wrench on it) and then use the saw to cut the inside of the pipe like you are trying to score it.


I understand what you are talking about. I am probably going to have to that.

So, I got a little antsy on my lunch at work and decide to see if I could get 'er to start or at least pop. I started by oiling the cylinder and checking the oil. Had to add a little oil and I am definitely going to have to change it. Anyways, I sprayed it with some ether in the cylinder and only got sort of a "chug" and some smoke. I fogged the carb and tried again and nothing. I have good fire and a guy I work with thinks there is not enough compression which is what the old owner told me. Tomorrow I guess I am going to have to grab a comp tester and see. I am really just hoping it is the head gasket. If I have to pop the head off is there anything in particular that I should look for? And if I have to get a new one will I have to go to and AGCO dealer or will a small engine shop be able to get it for me?

Any thoughts or suggestions???

#12 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 02:01 PM

I would pull the head anyway. You can get head gaskets on fleabay and other places for about $7.00, here is one part 32246B head cylinder gasket tecumseh HH120 12HP - eBay (item 380071389261 end time May-02-10 09:29:20 PDT)

I would check to see if the valves are seating, they may have too much carbon buildup and need to be cleaned, could be a bad head gasket but either way you should clean out all the carbon in there. There are other possibilities but I think that would be the place to start.
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#13 MaintenanceMan OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 02:52 PM

Ok I will pop the head then. I was looking in the spark plug hole and I could see a little bit of the valves but couldn't really see if they were seating properly. Will I be able to lap them with the engine and head on the tractor? I have never lapped valves before but I think the biggest thing is just looking for contact all the way around the valve seat, right?

I took your word for it and bought the head gasket from that ebay link btw.

Edited by MaintenanceMan, April 29, 2010 - 03:05 PM.


#14 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 04:22 PM

Yes, You can do the valve job "in frame". Just be sure to clean compound residue good. I just wipe with cloth, then hit it with carb spray. Before you spray it down, stuff a paper towel in the valve spring area to prevent compound residue from entering engine through the return drain hole there.




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