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When to plow?


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#1 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2011 - 06:08 PM

Soon I hope to be hosting 'Kenny's Plow Days' in my back yard. Since I have the Ford LGT 165 and a plow, I have decided to do away with the 4'X24' raised garden and got to a 8'X20' in ground. The area is just at the end of the raised area, have to take out some of the boards to plow. I know how (hopefully) to set the plow up, just wondering when to do it. We got around an 1 1/2" of rain over night and this morning. Should help soften things up. I do have a set of well used chains I can put on, but no weights as yet. Any and all are invited, but a rather small area for more than one tractor. Plus it's some distance from most of you. I'm open to suggestions.

#2 HALFSCALE OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2011 - 08:00 PM

You can plow any time in the fall as long as it isn't too wet, ground that has been plowed when it is too wet will get as hard as a brick and will not hold moisture in the dry months
when you turn the ground it shouldn't be shiny, thats a sign of too much moisture
plowing when it's too wet is probably the number one mistake when it comes to veggie farming
four years ago a friend of mine drove across my garden in febuary to cut wood in my woods, the ground wasn't froze enough and he left ruts, to this day i can tell were those ruts were when i plow !

#3 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2011 - 08:27 PM

i want to see a picture of your ground down there in OK. I was at Ft Sill for my basic training(ya it was yrs ago) and i never saw any ground there i though could be plowed well.

Ill start plowing here after the first hard frost. We got a lite one two weeks ago, but it didnt kill off much. We have the advantage of the cold temps, to bust up ground that was slabby from being plowed to wet. You probally dont get that cold there.

#4 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 05:04 AM

I like to plow after all the leaves fall off the maples in my yard, then spread them out thick as I can and plow them under with chicken poop and a little sawdust . Then cover it with black plastic to "cook" it . It also helps in the spring to get an earlier start.

Edited by skyrydr2, September 23, 2011 - 06:13 AM.


#5 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 05:11 AM

I like to plow after all the leaves fall off the maples in my yard, then spread them out thick as I can angle plow them under with chicken poop and a little sawdust . Then cover it with black plastic to "cook" it . It also helps in the spring to get an earlier start.



That sounds like a good idea,Keith.I bet that works great.

#6 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 05:30 AM

Thanks for the comments. I'll see about getting pics of the event. Don't have a video camera, so that's out.
Lauber1, the soil at my house is what we called black gumbo in Kansas. Sticks to everything. So I don't want it to wet. Clay is down about 12-16". Holds moisture pretty good till the clay gets dry.

#7 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 08:07 AM

Tht is a good idea! Back in the 80's I mowed 16 lawns besides working in the factory. The housing development where I was living had been buldozed out of a hill right after WWII. And the back yard was all blue clay(there were a lot of brick factories in this area in the early 1900's). I tilled and dug down 2 ft throwing the soil out of the hole.
Then I carried the leaves and grass clippings I was carrying off the lawns I mowed home and put layers of grass, leaves and dirt/clay into that hole untill it was mounded up. The next year I had a very nice garden where Adobe would have been.

#8 speedyg OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 12:36 AM

I like your idea skyryder2 I roll all of my dead standing crops right back into the garden. This year I will try the black tarp. It has to help cook the compost fairlly fast???????

#9 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 06:26 AM

Keith, how long do you leave the tarp on? What about getting moisture in there with the tarp? Momma has given me permission to use some nitrogen again. The last time I used it, my okra that was supposed to get 3' tall grew to 8'. Pods about 6" long and 1" dia. They were still very tender and great tasting, though.

#10 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 07:21 AM

Keith, how long do you leave the tarp on? What about getting moisture in there with the tarp? Momma has given me permission to use some nitrogen again. The last time I used it, my okra that was supposed to get 3' tall grew to 8'. Pods about 6" long and 1" dia. They were still very tender and great tasting, though.



I keep the black plastic not a tarp, on for as long as possible. right up until planting time, till it to create a nice fluffy seed bed, and plant.
with the chicken poo your garden will grow crazy !!! Horse poo is a waste of time, they prosess there food too well. Cow poop is better as is goat and lama poo too.
up here the best stuff, though in credibly smelly when first applied ..... is chicken doopy. Makes an incedble fertilizer tea to water with too.

#11 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 07:54 AM

skyrydr2 , does the black plastic help kill off the weed seeds ? The compost I've made in the past sometimes didn't kill enough weed seeds . Al

#12 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 08:40 AM

In theory, anyways, Al. I find I have less, but you can't get um all even with proper apps of Preen , I still got them. I don't like using any chemicals so I don't. I just pull them and let them decompose and use them as compost a year later.
This next growing season I am going to grow everything up through the plastic. With a soaker watering system. This way the weeds can't grow and insects will stay off my plants. Especially those damded slugs!
  • Alc said thank you

#13 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 09:52 AM

We tried the plastic about 5 yrs ago, still cleaning up small pieces of it in the ground. We always start with mowing/shredding off any crop matter, then plow it deep with either the 6 or 8" DB plow. Too wet wont bother me here as my ground is black sand, and will freeze out it the winter. In the spring i'll pull either a big horse disc or a 3pt roto-spader though the garden at an angle to the plowing. Later on i just use the tiller to go about 8" deep, them mark out the rows with the duals on the tractor. After that its just a matter of planting to the spacing or skipping a row if i have soomething that needs more room. I dont use any oil based fert other than about an icecream bucket full in the planter for starter, everything else come from the poop of an animal or stuff ive composted over the yr before. You have to be careful using chicken/turkey poop as its high in N and will burn stuff or just make it end up as all plant. I find the secret to keeping the weeds down is having several cultivators set to diffenrt spacings. I usally use 3 differnt DB 3pt ones, and then a little striup hoeing for the hard to get at places. The places were the duals run is ussally weed free as it hard for them to come up in the packed down ground.

#14 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 07:39 PM

Thanks, guys. Lot of good stuff in your posts.

#15 HALFSCALE OFFLINE  

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Posted September 26, 2011 - 05:00 PM

When you put manure on you should try and do it that you can turn it under with in three days, the nitrogen in manure is in the form of ammonia, and will evaporate out if left in the open air, thats probably one of the reasons tarpping works
  • KennyP said thank you




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