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Tire dry rot and crack repair???


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17 replies to this topic

#1 gapper OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2011 - 06:01 PM

I seen an old movie (worlds fastest indian) and the man in the movie was rubbing black shoe polish into the cracks of his tires to hide them. Is there anything on the market that would do a better and more permanent job. I am not looking for something to run on the road but something to make old tractor tires look a little better. You know put a tube in the tire to hold the air and something to make the tires look good. Some of these old tires as you know are no longer being made. What are some of the things you guys have tried to do. I know i am not the only person that wants the tires on my tractor to look better.

                       

#2 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2011 - 06:25 PM

The only thing I can recommend is black caulking. Not sure if it'll work, but at least it would fill in the cracks, and should stay pretty flexible. If you try it, let us know how it works.

#3 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2011 - 06:38 PM

M. E. Miller Tire Co. sells a water based black tire paint. I've used it on old farm tractor tires, it does make them look better (IMHO). A Qt. can lasted me for years, just keep it from freezing!

Repairs/Supplies

grnspot
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#4 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2011 - 08:55 PM

I don't know about repairing cracks, but I've heard that mineral oil on tires will keep them from cracking if you apply it before they do. It may help to keep the cracking from getting worse in a mild case too.
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#5 cookiemonster OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2011 - 10:52 PM

I used black weatherstrip adhesive to "glue" bicycle tread to an old toro self propelled that Icouldn't find replacement wheels for easily. Seems to fit the bill.

#6 brokenbudget OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 08:10 AM

the only way to permanently fix a dry rotted tire is to replace it with a new one:bounce:

#7 JD DANNELS ONLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 08:40 AM

That Movie was based on a true story. I remember as a teen reading about that Indian in Hot Rod Magazine.
You might have also noticed the reason he did that was to fool the Technical Inspectors into allowing him to run at Bonneville on tire that should not have been used at all.
And that when Craig Breedlove saw what he was doing, gave him new Goodyear tires(Breedlove was a Goodyear dealer).
At the speeds Bart was running a dry rot tire popping could have been a life changing experience.

We used to rub brake fluid on tire to make them shine? I don't know if it had any ill effect, since in the 70's tires never lasted long enough to dry rot(at least for me?).
I do have a tire on my Murray that has a crack in the sidewall, it has a lot of tread on it and I may boot it and put a tube in, but never worried about the cosmetics of it.

#8 gapper OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 12:09 PM

I think i might do some looking around and see if i can find something that will fit the bill. I know i was looking for something related to tires on the net before and seem to remember seeing a product that was made to fill in cracks on tires. I was not looking for that at the time so i never bookmarked the site. If anyone finds something or knows of anything else to do the trick keep us all posted and i will do the same.

#9 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 01:01 PM

About the best thing to use that would remain flexible and also do a good job filling and sealing would be urethane. I am talking about the black urethane that is sold in caulking tubes to install windshields with on newer cars.

I used to do autoglass for a couple years right out of high school. The older cars used the black butyl tape but the newer cars and all current cars use urethane when the windshields are installed. Just be careful with it because it gets everywhere and you need solvent to remove it. I think it would work great for the purpose of filling the cracks, then you could do the tire paint on top of it.
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#10 gapper OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 06:57 PM

that sound like it might just work. Where can i buy this stuff at?

#11 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 09:21 PM

that sound like it might just work. Where can i buy this stuff at?


I think the auto parts stores like advance auto carry it, probably napa too. It is usually in a tube for a normal size caulking gun.

#12 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2011 - 09:55 PM

that sound like it might just work. Where can i buy this stuff at?


Buy a box of latex gloves while you're at it!

#13 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 04:35 AM

About the best thing to use that would remain flexible and also do a good job filling and sealing would be urethane. I am talking about the black urethane that is sold in caulking tubes to install windshields with on newer cars.

I used to do autoglass for a couple years right out of high school. The older cars used the black butyl tape but the newer cars and all current cars use urethane when the windshields are installed. Just be careful with it because it gets everywhere and you need solvent to remove it. I think it would work great for the purpose of filling the cracks, then you could do the tire paint on top of it.




A buddy of mine just bought a restored 1960 John Deere 830 diesel ,and that is what had been done to the front tires.It didn't look bad at all.

#14 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 05:41 AM

About the best thing to use that would remain flexible and also do a good job filling and sealing would be urethane. I am talking about the black urethane that is sold in caulking tubes to install windshields with on newer cars.

I used to do autoglass for a couple years right out of high school. The older cars used the black butyl tape but the newer cars and all current cars use urethane when the windshields are installed. Just be careful with it because it gets everywhere and you need solvent to remove it. I think it would work great for the purpose of filling the cracks, then you could do the tire paint on top of it.

Wonder if this would help with sidewall leaks? I refuse to use slime and one of the front tires (5") on the 68 seeps out the side wall. Those are a real pain to tear down. Trying to take it off just bends the rim. Probably get a new tire and cut this one off.

#15 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2011 - 05:50 AM

I'd just go with tubes for side wall leaks.