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Bolens large frame snow/dirt plow replica


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#16 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2020 - 06:48 PM

His preference is to document via video although I am encouraging him to write it up too. 

Iain

Since I learned old school by following published documents and printed instructions this method seems to work best for me and I personally think that documentation stands the test of time over a video - even in todays hi tech world.  The videos that Joseph does are definitely top notch and easy to follow without the distractions of loud music and foul language that the majority of U tube videos posters seem to think are a necessity.  However I will liken a video to a classroom scenario where for several minutes you have the benefit of a quality instructor teaching and walking a viewer through a project much the same way a teacher in a class room does for three quarters of an hour as they explain a new use of a formula or how to derive an answer by only knowing some of the values. As long as everything is fresh in a persons mind and they have the benefit of any notes that may have been posted on the blackboard then things seem pretty straight forward.  Once the blackboard has been erased and the teacher has moved on to another lesson over the course of a few days what was once straight forward is now a distant memory as new thoughts and ideas bombard us in todays fast paced world. This is where good accurate documentation shines through much like a reference text book does in the classroom scenario.  It can be set on a shelf for three or four days, weeks or months and then looked at to quickly refresh a persons memory to sizes, layout drawings and steps necessary to make a project progress from the "I want to build one of those" to "I built one of those, it works great and I am proud of it".  In my teenage years I was fascinated by electronics projects and built many from plans published in hobbyist magazines - these plans always included lists of the parts required and the proper steps to construct the project so that it worked when you were done and what to look for if it did not work.  I think that has helped me over the years to try and layout logical steps that I use when I tackle a new project and try to explain the how and why of the steps I post about in my threads so that it may help others. Videos offer a more personal insight with the creator and give the viewer a more one on one being in the same room interaction to walk a person through a project and offer a chance to pass along an overview of a project but without detailed documentation to supplement the project I think in most cases the project will be out of the grasp of copying it for the majority of people.  Establishing good documentation abilities now will serve Joseph well in the future as other things and interactions steer and interest him in his lifelong journey.  Just my thoughts and opinion.    Look forward to seeing the next step in the build on its way to becoming a reality.    


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#17 nsengineer OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2020 - 06:58 PM

Very well said   agreed!!


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#18 nsengineer OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2020 - 07:16 PM

Since I learned old school by following published documents and printed instructions this method seems to work best for me and I personally think that documentation stands the test of time over a video - even in todays hi tech world.  The videos that Joseph does are definitely top notch and easy to follow without the distractions of loud music and foul language that the majority of U tube videos posters seem to think are a necessity.  However I will liken a video to a classroom scenario where for several minutes you have the benefit of a quality instructor teaching and walking a viewer through a project much the same way a teacher in a class room does for three quarters of an hour as they explain a new use of a formula or how to derive an answer by only knowing some of the values. As long as everything is fresh in a persons mind and they have the benefit of any notes that may have been posted on the blackboard then things seem pretty straight forward.  Once the blackboard has been erased and the teacher has moved on to another lesson over the course of a few days what was once straight forward is now a distant memory as new thoughts and ideas bombard us in todays fast paced world. This is where good accurate documentation shines through much like a reference text book does in the classroom scenario.  It can be set on a shelf for three or four days, weeks or months and then looked at to quickly refresh a persons memory to sizes, layout drawings and steps necessary to make a project progress from the "I want to build one of those" to "I built one of those, it works great and I am proud of it".  In my teenage years I was fascinated by electronics projects and built many from plans published in hobbyist magazines - these plans always included lists of the parts required and the proper steps to construct the project so that it worked when you were done and what to look for if it did not work.  I think that has helped me over the years to try and layout logical steps that I use when I tackle a new project and try to explain the how and why of the steps I post about in my threads so that it may help others. Videos offer a more personal insight with the creator and give the viewer a more one on one being in the same room interaction to walk a person through a project and offer a chance to pass along an overview of a project but without detailed documentation to supplement the project I think in most cases the project will be out of the grasp of copying it for the majority of people.  Establishing good documentation abilities now will serve Joseph well in the future as other things and interactions steer and interest him in his lifelong journey.  Just my thoughts and opinion.    Look forward to seeing the next step in the build on its way to becoming a reality.    

Very well said and I agree fully!!

 

 

 

Joseph, You and your dad do great work,  much attention to detail and great fabrication. It's priceless that the two of you can work together on these projects.   One thing to consider about some of the unexplained holes or odd fitting plates is that Bolens used many of the same pieces and processes throughout their lineup of tractors.  That same plate that is not cut to fit the largeframe quite as it should could have been used on a QT or tubeframe at some time and to keep production costs low they just made that same piece fit another application.  Just a thought.......


Edited by nsengineer, November 29, 2020 - 07:18 PM.

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#19 nsengineer OFFLINE  

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Posted November 29, 2020 - 07:41 PM

I was looking through the large frame parts manuals for snow plows and noticed that the manual blade has straight plates welded to the front and the hydro angle plows have the triangle shaped plates welded to the front.  I believe that if the plates were straight that the hydraulic cylinder would interfere with the plate if it wasn't cut on an angle.  Just a quick observation.


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#20 Joseph OFFLINE  

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Posted December 05, 2020 - 02:06 PM

Further progress on the Bolens HT snow plow replica. In this video, we do more welding on the frame and finish the mount for the swivel

 


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#21 kjmweld ONLINE  

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Posted December 05, 2020 - 03:44 PM

Coming along nicely so far guys. Keep up the great work, & thanks for the updates.
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#22 nsengineer OFFLINE  

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Posted December 05, 2020 - 03:57 PM

Very good video,  would love to have some of those tools in my shop!!    Looks great.


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#23 IHCubCadet147 ONLINE  

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Posted December 05, 2020 - 09:53 PM

Nice work! Looks like a fun project. 


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#24 Joseph OFFLINE  

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Posted December 06, 2020 - 06:53 AM

Thanks for following along, the kind words and the encouragement. This is going to take a lot longer than I first expected and I hope if we do get snow this winter it hold off until we are finished. We did have a little snow this week which did not settle but it is a concern.


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#25 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted December 06, 2020 - 08:58 AM

Great videos, Joseph!


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#26 4getgto OFFLINE  

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Posted December 06, 2020 - 06:15 PM

Sure does look like its coming along nice guys...👍
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#27 Joseph OFFLINE  

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Posted December 12, 2020 - 02:06 PM

A bit more progress on the Bolens HT snow plow replica. In this video we make up the brackets on the frame for the hydraulic cylinder and make the pins for the frame.

 

 


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#28 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted December 12, 2020 - 02:54 PM

Project is moving ahead nicely.  Nice that you shared how to start the threads for the grease fitting hole.  Another trick that works for those that don't have a lathe is to is to tack weld a hex nut onto a piece of flat steel - usually use a piece 1/8" thick x 1" x 2".  Drill a hole near one end for a bolt and then add a bolt and nut and draw up snug so the nut is flat against the steel.  Tack the nut in place and then after the weld has cooled remove the bolt and run a tap through the nut in case it is close to the edge of the hole and not quite centered.  The flat steel with the nut can then be set on top of the piece you wish to thread and start the tap down through the nut into the hole so that the tap is straight when it starts to cut in the hole - edge of the flat metal piece can be held with a pair of vise grips so tap can be reversed every so often to allow thread to clean if needed.  Once the thread is started remove the flat plate with the nut and set aside for the next time.   Sometimes the piece you want to thread cannot be fitted into a lathe - thought I would share.  


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#29 Joseph OFFLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2020 - 11:38 AM

Project is moving ahead nicely.  Nice that you shared how to start the threads for the grease fitting hole.  Another trick that works for those that don't have a lathe is to is to tack weld a hex nut onto a piece of flat steel - usually use a piece 1/8" thick x 1" x 2".  Drill a hole near one end for a bolt and then add a bolt and nut and draw up snug so the nut is flat against the steel.  Tack the nut in place and then after the weld has cooled remove the bolt and run a tap through the nut in case it is close to the edge of the hole and not quite centered.  The flat steel with the nut can then be set on top of the piece you wish to thread and start the tap down through the nut into the hole so that the tap is straight when it starts to cut in the hole - edge of the flat metal piece can be held with a pair of vise grips so tap can be reversed every so often to allow thread to clean if needed.  Once the thread is started remove the flat plate with the nut and set aside for the next time.   Sometimes the piece you want to thread cannot be fitted into a lathe - thought I would share.  

Great tip, thanks for sharing. It is tempting to make one up for each of the common sizes, then they are ready for use when required


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#30 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted December 14, 2020 - 07:24 PM

Great tip, thanks for sharing. It is tempting to make one up for each of the common sizes, then they are ready for use when required

I have found that larger thread sizes such as 3/8" and 1/2" are easier to start square than smaller sizes. The thread nut plates (what I call them) do come in handy at helping to thread a hole square and having them sitting ready to use is nice as you don't have to stop the project you are doing to create one.    


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