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Wheel weight brackets (pictures)


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#1 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2011 - 07:02 PM

Hi folks

A few people have been asking about what to do for weight on the back of their GT's. Here is a solution I came up with. I made some brackets to use weight lifting plates when I had a X475 GT. I traded the tractor for the 2320 and kept the brackets. Below are some pictures. 1/4" plate drilled for the 1/2" mounting holes on the rim and with access holes to allow removing the wheel without taking the bracket off. 1" round welded on to hold the plates and threaded on the end to allow a bolt and washer to be used to retain the weights. When I mounted the brackets I used 1/2" couplers and bolts to clear the bulge in the rims for the hub. Bolted the couplers to the rim and then mounted the bracket. I had about 80lbs/wheel which made a big difference. I am going to try to use these on the 314 but the older rims have a slightly smaller spacing on the mounting holes. I think I can still use them with 3/8" mounting bolts.
I later made a larger set for the 2320 which has 16.5" wheels. In the picture there is about 170 lbs on them. That's about the same weight as loading the tires, but I can easily remove the weights and then I have a tire/wheel that weighs about 75lbs and can be handled by 1 person. I can't wrangle a 250 lb wheel and that is my only objection to loaded tires when tires reaches this size.
This was cheap to do compared to buying wheel weights from JD. I bought most of the weights at yard sales. It took a while but I have over 500 lbs and can setup the 314 with at least 80lbs/wheel.
I used these for 3 years on the 475 and for 2 years now on the 2320 without any issues. If you have the tools to do the drilling and welding yourself then the cost is pretty low.
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  • NUTNDUN, broken2, mjodrey and 6 others have said thanks

#2 broken2 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2011 - 08:45 PM

Great idea & design. I'm gonna start keeping my eyes open for some weights and use your design to build myself some brackets. I have several gt's and not enough weights to go around, always end up stealing weights from one to use on another depending on the season.

#3 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2011 - 07:02 AM

Great idea & design. I'm gonna start keeping my eyes open for some weights and use your design to build myself some brackets. I have several gt's and not enough weights to go around, always end up stealing weights from one to use on another depending on the season.


This design works really well if you want to swap weights. It's relatively easy to move them. The grey weights that walmart used to sell are good because they are solid with no holes or ridges so they are compact and you can get more weight in a given space. The ones they sell now are wider with large holes in them.

#4 Sergeant OFFLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2011 - 06:54 PM

Interesting design:thumbs:

#5 spatter1 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2011 - 07:27 PM

Great idea! Thanks for sharing.

#6 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2011 - 08:45 PM

That's a great idea Brian! I like the design and may "borrow" the use of it for some of my wheel horses! Thanks for posting it!

#7 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2011 - 06:22 AM

That's a great idea Brian! I like the design and may "borrow" the use of it for some of my wheel horses! Thanks for posting it!


As you can see it will scale up to larger wheels. I used 3/8"plate on the larger ones and it took a while to drill the 1" holes for the wheel nut clearance, but that is optional. I just like the idea of being able to remove a wheel to do maintenance without having to fuss with the brackets. To keep the weights from turning when starting or stopping I use those anti slip pads that you use to line drawers or the type that goes under a carpet to keep it from sliding. On the 2320 the pressure from the retaining bolt/washer has been enough to keep them from moving due to the shape of the weights used. I used 5/16" bolts to retain the weights in the smaller ones but I think 3/8 is a better choice and used them on the larger ones.

#8 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2011 - 06:38 AM

Brian, that is a great idea. Guess I need to find some of those type weights or get a mold for all the lead I have.

#9 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2011 - 06:59 AM

Thanks Kenny. I had thought of using lead as well. I can get it for the cost of scrap lead at work. I was going to cast it in concrete. The overall density of a hybrid lead/concrete weight would be similar to steel. I decided to stick with the metal weights. I like to work with concrete. I made a concrete front weight for my x475 that I could pick up with the front hitch. I had a 3pt. dirt scoop that I used as a poor mans loader but I needed weight on the front to ballast it. Rather than buy and lug suitcase weights, I cast a concrete weight with the mounting pins and with sockets for the locking pins. It was about 200lbs and worked well. You could do the same for wheel weights. Use a round piece of sonotube for a form and electrical conduit to make channels for the mounting bolts. With enough lead in the mix (pun intended) you could get the density up to the point where you have some serious weight. You could do it really cheap if you already have the lead in small pieces. I have done a lot of thinking and experimenting with weight over the years. I have an aversion to spending large amounts of money for wheel or suitcase weights.

#10 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2011 - 07:06 AM

Hey Brian,great idea.:thumbs:

#11 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 05, 2011 - 06:18 AM

Brian, I have been looking for a 12" pan and something large enough to melt the lead with. I have a small single burner camp stove that I have been melting the lead with, making small, clean ingots. I have lots more to melt down. May have to get out the two burner model and get serious with the melting process.

#12 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 05, 2011 - 07:01 AM

Kenny, are you planning on casting a single wheel weight out of lead? If you were to cast a concrete weight with 60% lead and 40% concrete you would get a weight with the same or slightly greater density than cast iron. 50/50 would still be close at about 425 lbs/cuft. For instance a 10" diameter x7"long weight at 50% lead would work out to 135 lbs, which might be a little too much to handle easily. It could be cast in shallower segments to make it easier to handle.
I am including a couple of pictures of the front weight I cast. I still have a front hitch on the 2320 but have never needed front ballast. I had forgotten that I made, but never needed, an add on weight that attached to the main weight using 1/2" rods. You can see how I used the electrical conduit to create the channels for the rod. You can also see the pins and bushings I cast in for the front hitch. As I said before, I like working with cement! I hope this will give you a few ideas that may be useful.

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#13 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 05, 2011 - 07:03 AM

Brian, I have been looking for a 12" pan and something large enough to melt the lead with. I have a small single burner camp stove that I have been melting the lead with, making small, clean ingots. I have lots more to melt down. May have to get out the two burner model and get serious with the melting process.


Maybe one of those huge propane burners that people use for deep frying turkeys would do the job. You should be able to borrow one from someone.

#14 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 05, 2011 - 07:07 AM

Thought about watching CG for a turkey fryer. I just looked up the weight for a 12" round, 2" thick. Around 92 lbs., more or less. 10" round X 2" is about 64 lbs. Lead adds weight fast.

I am looking for rear weight that I can use on different tractors.

#15 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted September 05, 2011 - 07:17 AM

Lead is about 700 lbs/cuft and cast iron is somewhere around 450. Concrete is only 130-150 so you can see how much smaller a lead weight could be. For me the issue is handling the weights. I don't want to be dropping a 100lb weight on my foot. I like to keep them to 50 lbs to keep them easy to manage.






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