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JD LT155 Steering repair and advice


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#16 DeMOWtivated OFFLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2012 - 06:39 PM

Brian, thanks for the repair info. It came in handy tearing down the steering gear. I took it all apart, cleaned up some stuff, applied a bunch of Aero Kroil to the top of the sector gear, which now moves much easier but it still slips. I noticed some worn teeth on that part, but the pinion gear looked really good. Might be replacing some bushings and the entire sector gear.
Not sure how to get to the snap ring on the top of the sector gear though. The piece of metal the battery sits on is right over that ring. Might have to cut a notch in that so I can access the top of the sector gear.
KennyP, thanks for the offer. I think I can get done what I need with the stuff Brian posted here, but if I ever need the tech manual I'll hit you up.

Bob
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#17 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2012 - 06:28 AM

Bob, if you go to jdparts.com and do a model no. search for your tractor you can access the parts diagrams which may give you some clues on how to disassemble things. With the slipping gears it would be best to replace the gear that's worn. You can get part no's from JDParts and also pricing if you are registered with a local dealer. I just went and had a look at the steering parts and it looks like the sector gear is part of a larger assembly that costed out at 131$ Yikes!! That's a Canadian price so you might get something different when you check. If the damage is too great for the steering to work properly with new bushings then maybe you could look for a used sector from one of our sponsors.
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#18 DeMOWtivated OFFLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2012 - 11:42 PM

Been a while but I got my steering fixed. Thanks to all for the help, especially the pages of the manual that were posted, they were very helpful.

I took a bunch of pictures of the work I did. Some of what I am sharing may be old hat to some of you, but for new guys like me that come here looking for useful stuff, hopefully this will be helpful, and at least for me anyway, I am more a visual guy.

So first of all, getting the steering column out is the easiest part. Remove the steering wheel, the cotter pin above the upper bushing, put the PTO in the engaged position and the column is ready to come out.
I put 2 treated 2x4s in my garage rafter, and used a towing strap and come-along to lift the front end up so I could get under the mower.
Posted Image
You have to be a little careful with this, about the 10th time I did this I cracked the bumper, but it made working under the mower a lot easier.

The column came right out and it looked real good. The upper bushing was in good shape so I didn't change it out, but the lower bushing looked real bad.
Upper bushing here.
Posted Image
Lower bushing after removal.
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The tab on this bushing was completely gone and I'm sure the hole it went through grew in size as this bushing got reduced in diameter.

Next was getting to the top of the sector gear (or rack gear). I have a 90 degree snap ring tool but there is limited space so I cut a notch in the battery stand.
Posted Image
I just used my reciprocating saw with a good metal blade. I went with the "V" notch to save as much battery stand as I could and still get to the snap ring. Notice the lower steering column bushing. Those of you that have worked on steering before probably noticed right away the bushing is in upside down. I didn't think about which way the bushing would go and didn't pay close enough attention when I removed the old one. After getting it all back together I cut the grass and the steering quickly went south. The steering column could be lifted up 1/4 inch or so and that lower bushing rode up the column so there was a ton of play in the column. After looking at an exploded view of the steering parts at the John Deere dealer I realized I put the bushing in upside down. In other words, the shoulder of the bushing should be against the top of the pinion gear, so insert the lower bushing into it's hole before inserting the steering column when reassembling. It steers like a champ now.
The next step was getting the sector gear removed. This was no small feat. The snap ring was pretty much rusted in place and I had to get a screw driver in there and tap the snap ring to get it unstuck. Once it was unstuck I got it right out with snap ring tool. The sector gear bushing however was galled to the sector gear shaft. I heated it with a propane torch and hit it with a hammer but it didn't budge. I finally took my mower to work and the machinist used a hole saw to cut the shoulder off the bushing and sector gear fell out the bottom.
Posted Image
There are spots where you can't tell where the shaft stops and the bushing starts. Fortunately I already purchased a new sector gear ($109 US) so if they guys would have chopped the old one into 15 pieces to get it out I wasn't worried. I was just glad I got it out.
The sector gear was pretty worn down in the right turn gears.
Posted Image
Pretty bad after 10 years of service. $109 US part that I think I could have saved if I had known to do some upkeep, and what upkeep to do.

As I was reassembling all the parts, I smeared a bunch of anti-seize compound on the steering column shaft where the bushing go and also on the top of the sector gear shaft where it's bushing sits. I am hoping that this will help prevent rusting and keep the steering smoother.
Moving forward I am planning on taking this all apart every 2 - 3 years and inspecting the bushings and sector gear. I think as long as everything stay snug and rust free I can make this new sector gear last longer than the 10 years the old lasted.
Once you take apart your steering and put it back together you'll see how easy it is and a little labor can save you over $100. The bushings for the steering components run between $2 - $4 each, so for me a little effort on my part and few bucks in bushings can save me over $100 on other parts.

I hope this post has helped. I am by no means a John Deere expert. I was able to do what I did thanks to the help I got from some of the folks on this forum and I thought I'd pass along some of the knowledge I've picked up along the way. I know there may be better ways to do what I did, but for those of you thinking about doing steering work on your own, hopefully this info will help.
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#19 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 21, 2012 - 05:57 AM

Thanks Bob for your very thorough documentation of this job. I'm sure this will be a big help to many other owners of these tractors. There are lots of good tips here. I really like the machinists idea of using a hole saw to cut the shoulder off the bushing. Thanks again and don't hesitate to participate in any topic that you are interested in here regardless of which forum it's in.
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#20 narvesen OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2012 - 09:39 PM

I'm getting ready to tackle this repair this weekend myself. My mower will turn left, but not right, Any suggestions of what parts would be good to pickup from the JD dealer before getting started? I may have questions when I get working on it.

Thanks!
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#21 qonjin OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 09:02 AM

I had the same problem but at 12 years old for my LT155 steering, ok on left but right spins and sometimes it would snag. After looking at it I noticed the steering sector would come in contact with the frame and I filed it down until it did not do it again. I am going to replace the belt, idlers, Steering shaft, sector and the bushings. I do not know if the steering was sticking due to the bushing wear and the sector coming in contact with the frame, possible engineering/manufacturing defect? I used 4 jack stands for my repair.


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#22 myersbr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 15, 2014 - 08:02 AM

I know this is a bit of an old thread, but since it was EXTREMELY helpful to me as I've worked through this issue, I thought I'd add my experience (although I'm not quite finished).

 

1. The snap ring is HARD to get to (as was mentioned). Instead of cutting a notch in my battery tray, I just took a good pair of vise grips and bent it up some to be able to access the snap ring more easily. I'll bend it back down when done. Hopefully this will be a less destructive way.

 

2. Since my garage has a finished ceiling I couldn't use the joists to help me get the front of the mower in the air. Jack stands just got in my way, so I went to option 3. just lying on my side/back. There was plenty of room to access everything I needed to get to.

4. The bolt holding on the steering wheel has been my nemesis. Since it is a tight fit to start and the mower is now 14 years old, I still don't have that out. After looking at the parts diagram and trying for all I was worth last night to unscrew it to no avail, I realize now my best bet since the nut is off is just to take a punch and hammer and knock the bolt out.

 

Thanks to all for this great thread. If I have any more good takeaways I'll pass them along when the project's done.


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#23 tjh43 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2014 - 09:19 AM

I recently purchased a 1998 LT155, with a 42" mulching deck. It runs well, and is in pretty good shape. My problem is that the front wheels seem to be "toed out". it makes it "push' when i turn. I did not get any manuals with the machine. I was just wondering if anyone could "steer" me in the right direction to correct this issue! Thanks in advance. 


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#24 satnerd OFFLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2014 - 10:16 PM

I recently purchased a 1998 LT155, with a 42" mulching deck. It runs well, and is in pretty good shape. My problem is that the front wheels seem to be "toed out". it makes it "push' when i turn. I did not get any manuals with the machine. I was just wondering if anyone could "steer" me in the right direction to correct this issue! Thanks in advance.


Just bought a 2001 LT155 yesterday with the same problem. I know you can buy adjustable drag links but I'm more of a DIY kinda guy so if anyone has any pointers, send them my way.

Thanks
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#25 Leatherneck OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2015 - 03:14 AM

Is there a tech repair manual for the repair of the steering on the JD LT155?

 

Thanks!



#26 Leatherneck OFFLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2015 - 06:55 PM

After doing much research I believe this is an easy project.  The hardest thing is the snap ring just below the battery plate?  I now have the LT155 standing on it's rear end. 

I am considering replacing the drive belt.  It has been on for approximately three years.

I do not believe it is necessary on the John Deere LT155 to remove the dash from the top?

All responses are greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks!



#27 Leatherneck OFFLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2015 - 09:29 PM

Job completed!  There were many post here that was very helpful!  The information, and the photos were very helpful! 

 

Now, after the John Deere being on its' rear, the transmission appears to be low. 

The grass where it was sitting appears to have hydraulic/transmission fluid on it.

The machine does not pull its' self.

At one time it tried to pull its' self.

It made a whining noise.

The machine stood up on its' rear end for about a week? ? ?

 

Is there a way to check the transmission fluid?

 

How do I put fluid back in it?

 

What kind of fluid do I put in in?

 

I thought maybe it was the button that had fell down inside of the panel.  I always pushed on it, when I would change directions.  I do not believe it was ever working.  There were no wires below the button that fell down.  Possible from being out in the elements of the hot weather.  The wires on the opposite side appear to have been modified preventing the necessity of having to push the yellow button to change directions. 

 

All responses is greatly appreciated.



#28 Gabriel OFFLINE  

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Posted July 15, 2015 - 09:25 AM

Job completed!  There were many post here that was very helpful!  The information, and the photos were very helpful! 

 

Now, after the John Deere being on its' rear, the transmission appears to be low. 

The grass where it was sitting appears to have hydraulic/transmission fluid on it.

The machine does not pull its' self.

At one time it tried to pull its' self.

It made a whining noise.

The machine stood up on its' rear end for about a week? ? ?

 

Is there a way to check the transmission fluid?

 

How do I put fluid back in it?

 

What kind of fluid do I put in in?

 

I thought maybe it was the button that had fell down inside of the panel.  I always pushed on it, when I would change directions.  I do not believe it was ever working.  There were no wires below the button that fell down.  Possible from being out in the elements of the hot weather.  The wires on the opposite side appear to have been modified preventing the necessity of having to push the yellow button to change directions. 

 

All responses is greatly appreciated.

Leatherneck,

 

I just sent you a PM with some information about how to check the transmission oil level and what kind of oil to use in your John Deere LT155. Hope it helps.


Edited by Gabriel, July 15, 2015 - 09:26 AM.

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#29 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted July 17, 2015 - 11:01 AM

Leatherneck, sorry we didnt see your posts earlier... One of the hazards of adding your posts on to the end of an older thread, I'm afraid.
Glad you were able to get it back together.
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#30 Dmlinn OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2016 - 09:55 PM

Thanks for the information. I purchased an aftermarket steering kit for $99.00 on Amazon. The instructions and comments here were very helpful for me to be able to change the pinion and steering gears, the bearings, etc. Thanks!




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