Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Suitcase weights or and fill tires


  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#16 MH81 OFFLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,277 Thanks
  • 28,615 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted August 12, 2011 - 07:13 AM

This will be my first year using the 316 in snow. I do not want to use chains if I can get away without them. I have asphalt and chains are rough on it if the wheel slips.


You might want to do something like this. http://gardentractor...in-report-3818/

#17 fishman OFFLINE  

fishman

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 5368
  • 19 Thanks
  • 130 posts
  • Location: Dayton pa

Posted August 12, 2011 - 09:02 AM

As long as you don't have tubes in I break 1 bead then pour fluid in much quicker, but if you have tubes you have to use adapter.

#18 flip OFFLINE  

flip

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 4705
  • 1 Thanks
  • 38 posts

Posted August 12, 2011 - 05:44 PM

I checked with my dealer. They want $150 labor plus materials to load the tires. I'll do it myself, just can't get the fancy stuff.

#19 johndeererf OFFLINE  

johndeererf

    New Member

  • New Member
  • Member No: 5198
  • 1 Thanks
  • 8 posts

Posted August 16, 2011 - 08:43 PM

Another alternative individuals are using is beet juice. It is a bit more expensive than Calcium, but is guarenteed to not damage your rims. We like wheel weights and suitcase weights ourselves, but sometimes they do not fulfill the weight required.

#20 flip OFFLINE  

flip

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 4705
  • 1 Thanks
  • 38 posts

Posted September 02, 2011 - 05:56 AM

I loaded mine this week. They hold a bit over 6.5 gallons which adds 50 lbs if you use just water. I used RV anti-freeze as the labor cost to have them loaded with something better was too high.

#21 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted September 02, 2011 - 06:45 AM

Another alternative individuals are using is beet juice. It is a bit more expensive than Calcium, but is guarenteed to not damage your rims. We like wheel weights and suitcase weights ourselves, but sometimes they do not fulfill the weight required.


The beet juice is called rim guard. We can't get it here. If it was available at a reasonable cost I would use it. Small GT tires only hold about 50lbs so they are not hard to handle when filled. I find I absolutely need to use chains because I can add all kinds of weight and still not be able to get up the hill on my gravel driveway when it is icy.

#22 ducky OFFLINE  

ducky

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 564
  • 1,623 Thanks
  • 3,863 posts
  • Location: Freedom, WI

Posted September 02, 2011 - 07:43 AM

I have used Rim Guard aka beet juice and Automotive anti freeze. Rim Guard comes in right there with (Calcium Chloride = BAD) at 10 lbs per gallon. A 90% fill will give you a 26x12x12 that weighs in at 180 lbs. If I remember the tire and wheel assy. weighed about 60 lbs. A23x10.50x12 comes in at about a 100 lbs. tire and wheel was 40 lbs. I had a guy pump it in for me.
Anti freeze at a 50/50 mix weights 8.5 per gallon so you can not get as much weight stuffed into the tire. I have a lot of this around so I tend to use it unless weight is really a big issue. I just break a bead on the valve stem side, put a 2x4 block under the rim to tilt it a bit and pour it in. If I had to buy the stuff I would use RV anti freeze.
I big beny you will notice is you will get a Much Much better ride due to the added weight. don't get carried away with air pressure either. I run 5 - 8 psi on a MF 1655.

#23 ducky OFFLINE  

ducky

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 564
  • 1,623 Thanks
  • 3,863 posts
  • Location: Freedom, WI

Posted September 02, 2011 - 07:46 AM

PS Rim Guard is about $10.00 a gallon around here.

#24 mac102004 ONLINE  

mac102004

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1420
  • 225 Thanks
  • 337 posts
  • Location: Cape Breton, NS

Posted September 02, 2011 - 08:15 AM

I've heard of people filling their tires with windshield wash, I meant to try it with my Sears last winter but never got around to it. Seems like the cheapest way to do it, at about $2/gallon. People say your better off with loaded tires and wheel weights than suitcase weights. It's a lot easier on the bearings in the rear end compared to weights on the tractor.

#25 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted September 02, 2011 - 07:13 PM

I think plumbing anti freeze is probably the best solution (pun intended). It is not highly toxic and is not that expensive. Windshield washer fluid contains methyl hydrate which is quite toxic if ingested. I have avoided filling my tires by using wheel weights.

#26 spatter1 OFFLINE  

spatter1

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 5968
  • 0 Thanks
  • 21 posts

Posted September 02, 2011 - 07:25 PM

Anyone have any thoughts or experience on what the antifreeze does to the tires? I'd be a little worried about it softening the rubber but I have no experience with it.

#27 flip OFFLINE  

flip

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 4705
  • 1 Thanks
  • 38 posts

Posted September 03, 2011 - 06:34 AM

Measuring my 23x10.5x12 tires, the inside dimensions are around 20 x 8 with a 12" rim. Now mine are not cubes so calculating (((20/2)^2 * pi) * ((12/2)^2* pi)) * 8 / 231 = 6.96 Gallons
Now I put 6.5 gallons in, so I am right on the mark since you need to leave headroom at the top. (Well it would be hard to leave it at the bottom). So for water you get an added 52 lbs to each tire, which is equal to most large wheel weights.

Weight in the tire does not stress your axle or frame and puts the weight centered directly where you need it.

#28 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted September 03, 2011 - 07:17 AM

Measuring my 23x10.5x12 tires, the inside dimensions are around 20 x 8 with a 12" rim. Now mine are not cubes so calculating (((20/2)^2 * pi) * ((12/2)^2* pi)) * 8 / 231 = 6.96 Gallons
Now I put 6.5 gallons in, so I am right on the mark since you need to leave headroom at the top. (Well it would be hard to leave it at the bottom). So for water you get an added 52 lbs to each tire, which is equal to most large wheel weights.

Weight in the tire does not stress your axle or frame and puts the weight centered directly where you need it.


Agreed. Wheel weight is best but not always as easy to do as adding wight to a 3pt hitch or rear weight bracket. The big issue for rear weight IME is weight transfer. Hanging weight off the back of the tractor transfers weight off of the front wheels. When I had the x475 I had a constant battle to steer it when the snow was heavy or it was icy. I ended up with about 150 in wheel weight and 150lbs on the back. A Dif lock helps to keep you going straight.
On the 2320 which is diesel and 4wd there is more weight on the front end so I have about 350 in wheel weight and 600 or so in the ballast box. With chains it will push a lot of snow up the hill on my driveway. If you have a flat or down sloping driveway it is a lot easier to make that first pass out to the street. I started another thread on wheel weight brackets that you might be interested in.

#29 DH1 OFFLINE  

DH1

    Electric Tractors

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 62
  • 4,587 Thanks
  • 5,295 posts
  • Location: Markham Ontario Canada

Posted September 03, 2011 - 03:17 PM

Here's a chart for how much fluid (US gal) can be put in tires, and how much weight would be added if you use Rim guard.
Someone might want to make this a sticky some where.

>Rim Guard Hydro-Flation Tables for Agricultural Tires | Drive Wheel Tires | Terra Tires | Light Construction Tires

IMO
Suit-case weights are good because they can be added, removed or moved, front to back quickly and easily.
Wheel weights or loaded (fluid filled tires), add weight right where the tire touches the ground, no extra load on the axles or wheel bearings.

Windshield washer fluid is easy to get and cheap, a little lighter than water.
Plumbing or RV anti freeze costs a little more but less hazardous, weighs about the same as WWF.
Rim Guard probably the most expensive but heavier than the above and not toxic at all.
Calcium is cheapest and heaviest (lbs per gal), but will rust the rims and is toxic.

What I learned back in jan.
>http://gardentractor...ded-tires-4051/

IMO
Fill the back tires with what ever fluid you want, then add extra weight if needed using wheel weights, suitcase weights, weight box, what ever you have.

#30 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted September 03, 2011 - 03:34 PM

Thanks for the link Doug. Can you get rim guard up in Ontario? We can't get it here. I find that too much weight added behind the rear axle will cause steering problems when plowing, particularly when you have the blade angled and try to push heavy snow. Weight is transferred off of the front axle and you end up going sideways. If you have dif lock it helps, but I had trouble with my x475 and had to go with a combo of wheel weight and rear weight to be able to steer it when the snow was heavy.




Top