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Suitcase weights or and fill tires


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#1 buck50bmg OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 11:55 AM

Just wondering, I have the rear bracket for my 318, I have 2 weights and will get more. I also just got 2 new rear tires and Im wondering if I should fill them with fluid or not.....

Thanks

#2 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 12:16 PM

It's a decent way to get 50# extra per tire. Good idea if you're pulling attachments, sucks if you get a flat or puncture tho.

#3 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 02:51 PM

With tires the size of a 318 they are still relatively easy to handle when filled. On larger tractors a concern for me is the weight of the wheel, which becomes too much for 1 person to handle if you need to remove it for maintenance. If you do decide to fill the tires see if your local dealer has Rim Guard. This is a non toxic filling solution.
Weights can get pretty expensive. You could try casting a weight out of concrete to fit the bracket. That is a cheap solution but not as dense as cast iron would be.

#4 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 03:07 PM

I vote fill the tires and get weights if you can. I am now a devoted tire filler LOL.

#5 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 03:17 PM

I am a fan of filled tires.

#6 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 03:48 PM

I vote fill the tires and get weights if you can. I am now a devoted tire filler LOL.


Yep, filled & weighted.....then you can pull stumps! Warning though, takes a good trailer to haul them once weighted real good.

#7 fishman OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 06:02 PM

Fill the tires, I use window wash fluid. It has to get pretty cold to freeze & not very harmful.

#8 Gibby OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 10:07 PM

Fill the tires, I use window wash fluid. It has to get pretty cold to freeze & not very harmful.


:ditto:

#9 rbhoover OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2011 - 07:41 PM

How many gallons per tire do they usually take (JD 316)? What is the best way to fill the tires?

#10 flip OFFLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2011 - 04:22 PM

Tractor supply sells an air/liquid adapter. Hook a hose to it and pump or siphon the liquid in. There is an air bleeder on the adapter that you need to stop and bleed occasionally. I have not done my 316 tires yet, just my big tractors which took 15-20 Gallons.
I purchased a second set of rims and ag-tires to use in the winter for the snow blower. The trick with the big tires when they are loaded is to jack the tractor to match the tire, not lift the tire to the tractor.

http://www.tractorsu...ter-kit-1170832

#11 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2011 - 04:56 PM

How many gallons per tire do they usually take (JD 316)? What is the best way to fill the tires?

Just a guess but I would say 5-6 gallons for 23/10.5X12. That means they will weigh maybe 80 or 90 lbs when filled, which is heavy but not unmanageable.

#12 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2011 - 04:58 PM

Tractor supply sells an air/liquid adapter. Hook a hose to it and pump or siphon the liquid in. There is an air bleeder on the adapter that you need to stop and bleed occasionally. I have not done my 316 tires yet, just my big tractors which took 15-20 Gallons.
I purchased a second set of rims and ag-tires to use in the winter for the snow blower. The trick with the big tires when they are loaded is to jack the tractor to match the tire, not lift the tire to the tractor.

Slime® Air/Water Adapter Kit - 1170832 | Tractor Supply Company


Do you find AG tires work well in the winter. I have found them useless without chains. We get a lot of freeze/thaw cycles here and a lot of ice buildup.

#13 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2011 - 05:15 PM

Do you find AG tires work well in the winter. I have found them useless without chains. We get a lot of freeze/thaw cycles here and a lot of ice buildup.


On ice it doesn't matter what tire you have unless it has metal spikes. Chains would be the only way to go. I would only use chains on a set of turf tires though because you will get more traction. Chains on ag tires might help a little but it would defeat the purpose of the chain since it would sit between the lugs other then a little strip that might be on top of a lug.

#14 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2011 - 06:54 PM

On ice it doesn't matter what tire you have unless it has metal spikes. Chains would be the only way to go. I would only use chains on a set of turf tires though because you will get more traction. Chains on ag tires might help a little but it would defeat the purpose of the chain since it would sit between the lugs other then a little strip that might be on top of a lug.


I agree that turfs are a better choice for chains in the winter but they are useless in sand, mud etc. I used regular 2 link chains when I had the AGs on the x475. They worked pretty well. The tires were true power's I think, and they had relatively narrow spacing between the lugs. You need to install them as tight as possible to help prevent falling between lugs. On my 2320 with industrial tires I use special chains like those below. The ring of links acts much like the ring chains used on AG's on large tractors. The cross chains help to smooth out the ride. These things bite pretty hard on the 2320. They weigh 100lbs each in the 12x16.5 size and have 3/8" links in the cross chains. I only need them if it gets icy and we have heavy snow. Last year I did not need to install them.

DUO-LADDER-2.jpg

#15 flip OFFLINE  

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Posted August 12, 2011 - 07:11 AM

This will be my first year using the 316 in snow. I do not want to use chains if I can get away without them. I have asphalt and chains are rough on it if the wheel slips.




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