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What implement should I use?


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#1 mark843 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 09:50 AM

The builder is finished building my new house and has graded and raked everything. Unfortunately we have not closed on the house yet and the dirt is hard after rain and being baked in the sun. I plan on planting grass beginning of September as it is the best time, but need to freshen up the soil again.

Would a box scraper/box blade be ok, or a rototiller? Any suggestions on other implements would be helpful also. I would need something I could pull on the back of my Bolens 1050 to do about 39000 sqft of yard.

Also, Anyone know how long it would take to do this size yard?

#2 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 10:32 AM

If the area is stoney I would get a landscape rake back in because whatever you use you will bring up stones again. If not stoney a sallow tilling would do the job.

#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 10:46 AM

Ducky nailed it. If you are dealing with nothing but top soil, a light tilling will be nice. Maybe even spread the seeds and turn the first 1/4".

If you are dealing with many rocks, Have the rake come back.

#4 mark843 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 02:09 PM

Thanks. I don't think there are many rocks, maybe pebble size ones but nothing large that I ever saw. I was hoping to avoid tilling and hoping a box scrape would work, but I will see if I can find one.

#5 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 02:16 PM

Thanks. I don't think there are many rocks, maybe pebble size ones but nothing large that I ever saw. I was hoping to avoid tilling and hoping a box scrape would work, but I will see if I can find one.

I am afraid a box scraper will be to aggressive. You may be able to get a hold of a rigid tooth drag or a section of spring tooth. You do not need much loose dirt for grass seed. An inch would be plenty.

#6 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 02:44 PM

Yes, like ducky said, I think a spike tooth harrow would be fine for the soil you describe.

spike harrow.jpg

#7 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 03:09 PM

The guys already nailed it, just wanted to chime in that a harrow or york rake would probably do a nice job at getting things loose.

#8 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 05:01 PM

If you can find an old set of metal bed springs, they do wonders. Flip up side down and drag away, they work great.

#9 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 05:05 PM

If you can find an old set of metal bed springs, they do wonders. Flip up side down and drag away, they work great.


If you only want to churn up a half inch or so, Kenny has the right idea. I have also used expanded metal (scrap) like they put in the floor of TSC trailers. Put cement blocks on for weight and start dragging it around. It will warp over mileage, so be prepared to flip & end for end once in a while.

#10 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 06:49 PM

You need a "scautanizer" don't know how to spell it or even if that's the right name for it.
We had a 5ft new one back when I worked for the landscaper.
What it is is a combination of a Box scraper, Scarafier, Landscapers rake and it has a soil pulverizer at the back.
It is adjustable to all types of soil conditions, each section can be adjusted to engage the ground more or less for whatever your needs are. The rear drum, puverizer roller is always down, engaged.
This will smooth out the roughest ground and break up all the chunks of clay to give a ready to sod surface. You can make it dig in, loosen up the soil, break up the soil and smooth it out in 1 pass.
We would run over a grass covered lawn with it, 3 or 4 passes and you would never know there was grass there, we did this for resoding jobs.
I can't find a picture of it but I found a Video of something similar, this one looks like it doesn't have the box scraper in it.
If someone can translate the Video it would give more info.


#11 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 07:09 PM

Found it >Soil Conditioner

This is what like what we had
rland1a.jpg

Edited by DH1, August 08, 2011 - 07:15 PM.
added content

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#12 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2011 - 07:36 PM

When nutin else is around have cut down a tree and dragged it , Also there is something you can coat the seed that helps them get a great start. Sow it and then drag. If you can water.

#13 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2011 - 04:28 AM

Mark, I believe you have a few options now.

#14 mark843 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2011 - 08:59 AM

Thanks for all the replies. I will see how much it rains for the next 3 to 4 weeks to gauge how hard the ground is and then go from there.

#15 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2011 - 04:13 PM

Yes, like ducky said, I think a spike tooth harrow would be fine for the soil you describe.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]18741[/ATTACH]


I planted 40 lbs of White Clover in a Cornfield this spring and used a spike tooth harrow behind my 318 and got a beautiful stand.




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