Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Ariens GT-19 - Preliminary Pictures


  • Please log in to reply
36 replies to this topic

#16 JimRhino OFFLINE  

JimRhino

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 94
  • 1 Thanks
  • 37 posts
  • Location: Southern Illinois

Posted April 14, 2010 - 11:19 AM

Thanks guys! It's really not in that bad of shape (other than the engine), and once I get the pressure washer to it, and de-gunk it, it'll look even better...and give me a better idea of what I am up against.

I heard back from Ariens Customer Service (via email) today... they say the tractor was built in December of 1980. Do tractor model years work the same way as car model years? Would this make the tractor a 1981 model? I wrote back and asked, but haven't heard from them yet.

#17 olcowhand ONLINE  

olcowhand

    Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Sponsor
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 20
  • 35,639 Thanks
  • 29,838 posts
  • Location: South Central Kentucky

Posted April 14, 2010 - 02:57 PM

Yep, likely an 81 model. Usually built after middle of the year, it's the next year model.
  • JimRhino said thank you

#18 JimRhino OFFLINE  

JimRhino

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 94
  • 1 Thanks
  • 37 posts
  • Location: Southern Illinois

Posted April 14, 2010 - 04:35 PM

Yep, likely an 81 model. Usually built after middle of the year, it's the next year model.


That's kinda what I thought, but didn't know for sure. Thanks! :smile1:

#19 Gary Burnett OFFLINE  

Gary Burnett

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 44
  • 10 Thanks
  • 98 posts

Posted April 15, 2010 - 10:02 AM

I don't know what it is about those 19HP Kohlers but just about every one I see have blown a rod,I have 4 GT 19s and 3 of them are blown (the way I bought them) the running one seems OK but I'm always wondering when I'm driving it.On the other hand everyone runs the 17HP down and I have several of them with no problems.

#20 olcowhand ONLINE  

olcowhand

    Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Sponsor
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 20
  • 35,639 Thanks
  • 29,838 posts
  • Location: South Central Kentucky

Posted April 15, 2010 - 10:43 AM

I don't know what it is about those 19HP Kohlers but just about every one I see have blown a rod,I have 4 GT 19s and 3 of them are blown (the way I bought them) the running one seems OK but I'm always wondering when I'm driving it.On the other hand everyone runs the 17HP down and I have several of them with no problems.


If it's anything like the Kohler MV20, then it's a sump problem. The oil sump screen is tiny & clogs over the oil pump intake screen easily, then has no oil pressure. Just a little trash or excess gasket sealer will clog the screen in a heartbeat! Bet it's the same thing with these engines.

#21 olcowhand ONLINE  

olcowhand

    Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Sponsor
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 20
  • 35,639 Thanks
  • 29,838 posts
  • Location: South Central Kentucky

Posted April 15, 2010 - 10:47 AM

On the other hand everyone runs the 17HP down and I have several of them with no problems.


The problem with the early series I Kohler twins was the oiling system (not fully pressurized). They did fine on level to slight sloped land, but would run dry of lube if on steeper angles. They run forever on flat land if properly serviced.

#22 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

NUTNDUN

    Lost in Cyber Space

  • Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 3
  • 10,266 Thanks
  • 15,618 posts
  • Location: Pennsylvania

Posted April 15, 2010 - 01:15 PM

Jim,
That Ariens is a nice looking tractor and looks to be in great shape apart from the motor. Everyone will steer you in the right direction when you need help. I am with these guys as far as just doing the motor for now and running it for a year or so and then repaint if you want to. It is already in good shape. Plus you will have the sentimental value to it which is priceless.

#23 Guest_hooligan_*

Guest_hooligan_*
  • Guests
  • Member No: 0
  • 0 Thanks

Posted April 15, 2010 - 11:23 PM

The GT 17 and GT 19 shared the KT series twin engines, both VERY prone to breaking connecting rods. Bad/flawed design to begin with. The series one engine which ran through 1978 were total junk, no oil pressure, and not enough oil journals to lubricate the crankshaft, The series two weren't much better, but as whole, none of the kohler twins seemed to be as reliable as the kohler single cylinders. I would SERIOUSLY consider putting a Kohler K341 16 hp in it, or a Kohler Magnum 18 or 20 hp, which ever engine you could find in the best shape for the best price. I really doubt you'll want to spend the bucks for the rebuld kit and machine work on the KT19. Sorry, I'll watch this thread closer, good luck. While you might not be mechanically inclined the lions share of the work after it's running is cleaning, sanding, priming, and painting, I feel your probably pretty well suited for that eh. Mike

#24 Guest_hooligan_*

Guest_hooligan_*
  • Guests
  • Member No: 0
  • 0 Thanks

Posted April 16, 2010 - 06:58 AM

The problem with the early series I Kohler twins was the oiling system (not fully pressurized). They did fine on level to slight sloped land, but would run dry of lube if on steeper angles. They run forever on flat land if properly serviced.


I thought that too, until I went to sell three KT17 engines, two sreies ones and a series two engine. I talked to a BUNCH of people from hundreds of miles way that were trying to keep their Deere's, Cubs, and Bolens running. One guy had had 6 KT17 engines in his John Deere 317 the last one a 4 year old factory NOS replacement series two. His land was flat as a fritter, same with the Bolens QT17 I got in Owasso Oklahoma used on a flat piece of ground 2 months a year to spray christma trees, never even mowed with it, busted connecting rod. The series one had 5-515 lbs of pressure and only about half the necessary oil journal. The series two had 35-50 lbs of presure and double the journals, but there were still many engiiines failing, not very reliable

#25 JimRhino OFFLINE  

JimRhino

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 94
  • 1 Thanks
  • 37 posts
  • Location: Southern Illinois

Posted April 16, 2010 - 02:28 PM

Good tips and advice from all...thanks! For the sentimental value of the tractor, I will probably attempt the rebuild first. This thing is not likely to see any heavy work, unless pulling the kids around our small 'city' lot, and pulling the lawn rake, would be considered heavy work. LOL... For now I'm still a city boy who happens to have a tractor that is waaay to big for his yard. Just a toy. A tinker toy at that.

On another note, I did dig out the air pump today and was pleasantly surprised to discover that I only have one tire that is completely dead. After burying itself into my yard for the last 2 years, the front-right tire is the only one that will not hold air. The back-right tire was only spared thanks to a tube in the tire that had not rotted out. The tires on the left were still holding air...I just added some to each to pump 'em up a little more.

In advance, thank you all for your input, suggestions, ideas, and help!!

Carpe 'Que,
Jim Rhino

#26 Guest_hooligan_*

Guest_hooligan_*
  • Guests
  • Member No: 0
  • 0 Thanks

Posted April 16, 2010 - 09:46 PM

Good tips and advice from all...thanks! For the sentimental value of the tractor, I will probably attempt the rebuild first. This thing is not likely to see any heavy work, unless pulling the kids around our small 'city' lot, and pulling the lawn rake, would be considered heavy work. LOL... For now I'm still a city boy who happens to have a tractor that is waaay to big for his yard. Just a toy. A tinker toy at that.

On another note, I did dig out the air pump today and was pleasantly surprised to discover that I only have one tire that is completely dead. After burying itself into my yard for the last 2 years, the front-right tire is the only one that will not hold air. The back-right tire was only spared thanks to a tube in the tire that had not rotted out. The tires on the left were still holding air...I just added some to each to pump 'em up a little more.

In advance, thank you all for your input, suggestions, ideas, and help!!

Carpe 'Que,
Jim Rhino


Better save a lot of cash if your going to rebuild, Parts are going to be really high on that engine, that is IF they're still available

#27 Guest_hooligan_*

Guest_hooligan_*
  • Guests
  • Member No: 0
  • 0 Thanks

Posted April 16, 2010 - 10:09 PM

I just did some checking, No luck finding ANY pistons, so hopefully you can salvage those. Of course, thats a mute point if you take the engine to the machine shop and they need to bore the cylinder, 90 percent chance they do. So now you'll have to figure out what size to bore the holes in order to find pistons.The gaskets, valves, rods, rings, etc will cost well over 250 dollars. I'm not trying to be a bummer, but if you cant get the pistons in oversize, it doesnt really matter what the rest of the parts cost. If you think you can rebuild without MICing that engine, you might as well use your money as barbeque fuel

#28 JimRhino OFFLINE  

JimRhino

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 94
  • 1 Thanks
  • 37 posts
  • Location: Southern Illinois

Posted April 19, 2010 - 01:33 PM

Hooligan,

I appreciate your input, thanks. I've been looking at different engines (you suggested the Kohler Magnum 18 or 20), but there are lots of different ones out there. Prices ranging from $1,200 to $2,800. How do I know which one will fit this tractor? I would be more interested in the 20hp...bigger is better right??? :)

#29 Guest_hooligan_*

Guest_hooligan_*
  • Guests
  • Member No: 0
  • 0 Thanks

Posted April 19, 2010 - 07:54 PM

Hooligan,

I appreciate your input, thanks. I've been looking at different engines (you suggested the Kohler Magnum 18 or 20), but there are lots of different ones out there. Prices ranging from $1,200 to $2,800. How do I know which one will fit this tractor? I would be more interested in the 20hp...bigger is better right??? :)


Not at all Jim, as the years went by they lied more and more about true horse power, todays 25hp Briggs or Kohler may not be able to out power a old 16hp kohler cast iron single cylinder, add to the fact of the weight over the front wheels, twin versus single cylinder, and you have a tractor that doesn't need the power steering, You can find a complete used 16 hp kohler K341 for under 200, sometimes with a tractor attached to it, think trading stock. The machine shop will cost under a 150.00 for MICing the cylinder, boring and turning the crank. They'll also clean and acid dip the block, and about that same amount (150.00) from me, for the new piston, rings, rod, valves, and all gaskets. Add another 100 if they put it together for you. so for about 300.00 you can have a new 16 hp engine, just one less hp and a lot less weight, ergo you lose nothing in power or preformance. These tractors actually were made in 12, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22 hp configurations, maybe a few more. I have a 14hp single and a 18hp twin and they are VERY comparable in power. I really believe the single cylinders are much more reliable and afford all thepower you will eve need. Mike

Edited by hooligan, April 19, 2010 - 08:02 PM.


#30 Encrypt OFFLINE  

Encrypt

    Member

  • Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 502
  • 9 Thanks
  • 89 posts

Posted May 22, 2010 - 10:33 PM

Jim, Not sure if you figured out about the tab under the seat for the "DO NOT TOW". It's a relief valve that allows the hydraulic oil to move freely and not under pressure. If you pull it "UP" then the valves are open and you can move the tractor around freely. If the tab is "DOWN" then the valves are closed and you should not push or pull the tractor unless it is running and able to be moved under its power.




Top