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#16 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2011 - 08:36 PM

Daniel, you had me doin' math and scratching my head, but believing... "Pay no attention to the PayLoader behind the curtain"

#17 mac102004 ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2011 - 09:16 PM

You can't redo a silage pit when it has silage in it! Whenever it's empty, that's when it's time! Both our large pits were filled at the same time, and the other one is still 1/2 full. Next year if we can afford, it'll be the other pit to get this treatment. It's the smaller pit we'll be doing this Fall & Winter. We'll have way too many other things needing done come Spring.


LOL, I know up here, everybody including ourselves has at least first cut done, so it would have been refilled by now. I can't say I know much of anything about silage bunks/pits anyway, we have tower silo's.
I find it easier to get things done in early spring than summer. It seems you just get your first cut of silage done and then your on to hay, then 2nd cut silage.

#18 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2011 - 09:23 PM

LOL, I know up here, everybody including ourselves has at least first cut done, so it would have been refilled by now. I can't say I know much of anything about silage bunks/pits anyway, we have tower silo's.
I find it easier to get things done in early spring than summer. It seems you just get your first cut of silage done and then your on to hay, then 2nd cut silage.

Curious, What are you cutting for silage? Hay would be Grass and/or alfalfa. Do you cut Winter wheat as silage? It is done in Kansas where they can not grow alfalfa.

#19 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2011 - 09:35 PM

LOL, I know up here, everybody including ourselves has at least first cut done, so it would have been refilled by now. I can't say I know much of anything about silage bunks/pits anyway, we have tower silo's.
I find it easier to get things done in early spring than summer. It seems you just get your first cut of silage done and then your on to hay, then 2nd cut silage.


These 2 larger pits are always filled with corn silage, and we're about a month from chopping. The 3rd smaller pit, that we're redoing this fall/winter normally has haylage in it. We're rolling ALL our hay this year so we can rebuild that pit. We've already got our 3rd cutting of alfalfa/orchard grass. It's been an incredible hay year for us. We could have started on this pit earlier in the spring of this year, but my Dad had hip replacement in January, then bladder cancer surgery in March. Not been a great year. My Son's wife also took off in late March, so I've been the only one going at 100% for quite some time, then recently I dropped to 60 to 70% with health issues. I'm back to 100% now. Much of my problems may have been due to stress.

#20 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2011 - 09:39 PM

Ducky, we used to chop winter wheat, but finally talked Dad out of it. The cows don't eat it well, and the milk drops whenever we fed it. The alfalfa/orchard grass mix they like, and it added to the corn silage brings up the fiber content. You'd think corn silage had plenty of fiber! LOL We usually add about 15% haylage/85% corn silage, then add the supplements.

#21 mac102004 ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2011 - 09:41 PM

Curious, What are you cutting for silage? Hay would be Grass and/or alfalfa. Do you cut Winter wheat as silage? It is done in Kansas where they can not grow alfalfa.


It would be mostly alfalfa, with some other things mixed in. Some timothy, red clover etc.

#22 mac102004 ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2011 - 10:02 PM

These 2 larger pits are always filled with corn silage, and we're about a month from chopping. The 3rd smaller pit, that we're redoing this fall/winter normally has haylage in it. We're rolling ALL our hay this year so we can rebuild that pit. We've already got our 3rd cutting of alfalfa/orchard grass. It's been an incredible hay year for us. We could have started on this pit earlier in the spring of this year, but my Dad had hip replacement in January, then bladder cancer surgery in March. Not been a great year. My Son's wife also took off in late March, so I've been the only one going at 100% for quite some time, then recently I dropped to 60 to 70% with health issues. I'm back to 100% now. Much of my problems may have been due to stress.


We don't grow any corn at all. Don't think I would want to. Seems to be too high risk. It's been a terrible year up here so far, the guys who chop corn wont be getting on the fields for a long time yet.
Hay SUCKS. But when you say "rolling ALL our hay" that means you are blessed with a round baler. We make around 3000 small square bales. We have never had the ability to feed round bales in our old barn. With the new setup, which SHOULD be up and running as early as this fall, we will be able to feed round bales.

I can understand where your coming from. We have been building this new free stall barn for the last 5 years and it just seems to get so dragged out with other things going on too. It really kills any free time you might of had otherwise. It's really something that should have been done a long time ago, but it is what it is. Milking in a stanchion barn is not great for your back and knee's. Not to mention what they do to the poor cows. I don't know how your barn is setup?
My grandfather is in his mid 70's, and although he has parkinson's disease, he is still able to do all of our plowing, seeding, and grass cutting. Other than that he's basically retired, but it is a big help. Makes for more time for other projects to get done. I really don't understand how one or two guys can run these dairy farms up here with 60,80, 100+ cows. We are only milking about 35 right now and it's not hard to get beat into the ground with the 3 of us + my grandfather.

What are you milking Daniel? Don't know much about the dairy industry down there. You guys don't use a quota system or anything do you?

#23 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2011 - 08:43 AM

Milking 74 right now, with about 24 additional dry cows. Just 3 total of us. dad is 85yrs old, then myself (52) and my son (30). My wife feeds the baby calves. We milk in a double 6 herringbone, milking both sides at the same time through a low line weigh jar system. 120 freestalls for the cows. We sometimes work awfully hard, and this heat is making it almost unbearable. Heat index is to hit 114F+ today and 116F+ tomorrow. Putting in 2 more cooling fans in the barn today, in-between unloading concrete blocks as he delivers them. Hoping to set a few also, but with the heat, who knows. No quota system, but sometimes I wonder if we should go to it. Right now though, we're better off without it as the price is above $23/100wt including quality premiums.

#24 mac102004 ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2011 - 11:24 AM

You are an "olcowhand" then eh? Uncle is 50, father is 46, and I'm only 20 today.

Double 6 is what we are looking at for our new barn. It has enough for 70 cows, but with the quota system it's very expensive to expand. The quota is based on kilograms of butterfat, a really good cow would pretty near fill 1kg, but more than likely 2 average cows. Right now the price of quota here is around $28,000 per kg. So if you wanted to up the heard 20 cows, it would cost you $280,000 just for quota.

That's way to hot for me. If it hits 100 deg we just don't work LOL I would imagine it's pretty dry down there that kind of heat.

#25 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2011 - 11:29 AM

Actually, my area has had ample rainfall so far. Now they are saying heat index will top 155F here today, and I believe it. I was scraping more dirt with the Massey this morning, and she kept dying out.....vapor locking! I think I'll take the hood off this afternoon to allow better air flow. Gotta run, a load of giant concrete blocks just arrived!

#26 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2011 - 11:34 AM

You are an "olcowhand" then eh? Uncle is 50, father is 46, and I'm only 20 today.

Double 6 is what we are looking at for our new barn. It has enough for 70 cows, but with the quota system it's very expensive to expand. The quota is based on kilograms of butterfat, a really good cow would pretty near fill 1kg, but more than likely 2 average cows. Right now the price of quota here is around $28,000 per kg. So if you wanted to up the heard 20 cows, it would cost you $280,000 just for quota.

That's way to hot for me. If it hits 100 deg we just don't work LOL I would imagine it's pretty dry down there that kind of heat.


I can not imagine how you can recover that kind of expense from 20 cows.

#27 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2011 - 06:49 PM

No using the Massey today, but I did get 25 blocks set in place, one complete wall starter run, and 2 2nd layer blocks. Got the gravel for drainage behind the bottom run put in. Later I will get more pics & move this to the "Off Topic" section, as it will be a might off being a Massey subject.

#28 motobreeder OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2011 - 07:33 PM

You work too hard. Been a while but I was at a relatives farm in northern Ontario - they use a robotic milking system.
Feeding is done using a puree of silage, round bales and water.
Grains and minerals are a "treat"/incentive given in the milking booth.
Cows are milked when they want to milk.

#29 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2011 - 09:28 PM

You work too hard. Been a while but I was at a relatives farm in northern Ontario - they use a robotic milking system.
Feeding is done using a puree of silage, round bales and water.
Grains and minerals are a "treat"/incentive given in the milking booth.
Cows are milked when they want to milk.

That sound like our very large diaries down here in Wisconsin.
When you milk cows in those #s how are you able to recover the cost of your BF/KG limits that are imposed on you in Canada?
Love to here how other people make $ milking Cows.

#30 mac102004 ONLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2011 - 06:12 AM

Any farms of that size would have to have been around for a long time, most likely growing slowly, buying a couple extra kg's of quota every year. Once you have it you have it. The quota system was put in in Ontario in 1969, and by '74 all provinces had it. When they made that change I would imagine each farm was given their quota based on their current productions, and then paid for any additional quota they wanted (if available). I would say the price of quota was probably a lot cheaper back then as well, and the price of milk better. I wasn't around back then, but everyone around seems to say those were the glory days of dairy farming around here.

You don't see people buying 10, 20, 30kg at a time. There is rarely that much quota available on the exchange. I know one of the bigger guys sold out recently, so there is 100kg available, but it will take a while for it to all sell.

The dairy industry here certianly isn't as lucrative as it once was, but it can still be a profitable business.




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