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Big Farm Project Coming - Completed!


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#31 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2011 - 08:03 PM

Case looks great in the hat Paw Paw! The Lego wall is coming along nicely too! Best of luck with the rest!

#32 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 08:51 AM

Wall is looking good. But like the other I think it needs to be tied in place.

#33 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 09:08 AM

Back at the wall work in a few minutes. I'm not going to finish the top half of the back filling until we start putting in silage. That way I won't have to worry about any collapsing issues. Once I get silage packed up to the 1/2 point level of backfill, then I'll put in the top side backfill. No way it'll move once the silage is going in. I very much doubt it would collapse anyway, as if we backfilled all the way now, we would lay plastic over it to prevent any rainfall from getting in. You'd have to see how the ground laid to understand. That said, going the safer route would be best. Gonna stack the block on the pit floor (in the pic) first today, then get my Massey w/FEL & prep the other side for the first run of block, then put in the gravel drainage backfill. I gotta get mowing done sometime though!

#34 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 09:38 AM

That's looking good! Looks like you know what your doing. I agree that once you get it full any outside pressure wll equalize with the pressure on the inside.With the gravel drainage water shold run off and not have excessive pressure on the walls.
Several years ago a dike broke in Des Moines and flooded an area where one of the guys I work with had a home.
As soon as he could get back to his house he said he was going to pump out the basement. Several of us told him not to as the pressure of the water saturated ground would push in the basement. He did not believe us bought a pump and did it anyway and his basement collapsed.
Total loss because he was impatient. I'm not that sold on the outside anchors, I helped do that to a basement for our church fellowship hall and am not convinced it's best. I would lean more to the use of a Michigan bench, which I have helped install in many basements that seems to work better and have stood for over 30 yrs.
You have a solid handle on this project, so I'm sure it will be fine.

#35 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 05:22 PM

That's looking good! Looks like you know what your doing. I agree that once you get it full any outside pressure wll equalize with the pressure on the inside.With the gravel drainage water shold run off and not have excessive pressure on the walls.
Several years ago a dike broke in Des Moines and flooded an area where one of the guys I work with had a home.
As soon as he could get back to his house he said he was going to pump out the basement. Several of us told him not to as the pressure of the water saturated ground would push in the basement. He did not believe us bought a pump and did it anyway and his basement collapsed.
Total loss because he was impatient. I'm not that sold on the outside anchors, I helped do that to a basement for our church fellowship hall and am not convinced it's best. I would lean more to the use of a Michigan bench, which I have helped install in many basements that seems to work better and have stood for over 30 yrs.
You have a solid handle on this project, so I'm sure it will be fine.




What is a Michigan bench?
Never heard that term before.

#36 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 06:33 PM

What is a Michigan bench? Never heard that term before.


:ditto: Inquiring minds want to know LOL.

#37 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 07:07 PM

Well Michigan bench is the term that has been used in this area at least all my life. It was used to repair basements and foundations on homes and barns built in the 1800's of field stone, flsts of limestone(dad called it flagstone) and sometimes sandstone and often red clay brick or tile.
No footings were poured originally, just dug well below frost line and the stones layed in the dirt
and mortered together.
Over time the mortar would decay and they would begin to kick in the walls. Digging down and pouring a footing a foot or two wide inside the walls. Then a shelf was poured on top of that footing about 3 ft up the wall. It would butress up the walls and prevent them kicking in. I have helped do many for family and friends. Now Dan may be able to help with this question, cause I don't remember the formula. But those red brick walls were remortered with a plaster mix used to resurface inside Silos and it used alum as a hardening agent.
My father inlaw is gone and I don't remeber the proportions.

Edited by JD DANNELS, July 26, 2011 - 07:13 PM.

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#38 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 07:52 PM

Sorry, I can't help with that recipe. Wait, found an OLD online paper on the very subject! Concrete - Google Books
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#39 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 08:02 PM

So, please correct me if I'm wrong here, but what I gather from your description, is that a Michigan wall, is an extra wide sub footing
built above the original footing? The idea being that the weight of the backfill resting on the "bench" footing stops the wall from caving in?
Is that sorta right?
I'm interested in how things use to be done. We learn from our fathers.

#40 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 09:02 PM

If you have seen old basements in old homes you may have seen the wall built out on the inside into a shelf.
To not disturb the existing wall(remeber it's just sitting on dirt) the floor was busted out and digging down a footing was put inside the wall.
Then formed up and the shelf formed over the footing.(this could make the lower 3 ft of wall as much as 3 ft thick, As much reinforcement bar as was available poured into the shelf.
In fact on my wifes uncles house he had a bunch of rail from the railroad. We drove 4 pcs into the dirt about 4 ft so they were just short of the height of the shelf. Then we wired another across those uprights about 2 ft off the floor and poured concrete around it. Hell for Stout!! If that's not clear let me know,Ill try to explain it better.
I'd love to be around if anyone ever tears that out.
And yes my father-in-law taught me these things, He only had an 8th grade education.
But education is not a good measure of intelligence! He and my dad never finished High school but they taught me things that are not in any book written in the last 50 yrs.

Edited by JD DANNELS, July 26, 2011 - 09:24 PM.

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#41 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2011 - 09:05 PM

that's a good way of renforcing the walls, the rail track idear is a great one, it will last for shure,
trowel

#42 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 27, 2011 - 08:56 AM

Thanks Dan for that link! I had forgotten there was lye in that mix. One Winter we dumped 3 ton of sand through a basement window and got an untold number of bags of portland cement and spent a few weeks plastering the walls in my father in laws basement. I mixed every bit of it in a mud boat with a hoe, but could not remember the formula.
Guess that's what 40 yrs can do to ones memory? When that plaster was dry, you could beat on it with a hammer and never crack it.
And that house built in 1900 is still standing proud.

#43 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 28, 2011 - 03:03 PM

Just got 14 blocks brought in today. Got them stacked into the wall. Officially half done laying the block. Pics later. It's been hot as hades out today & my head is a splitting!

#44 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted August 04, 2011 - 09:19 AM

Been slow updating, but James has brought a couple loads since my last post. This morning, he had a load in my drive before finishing the milking! He hopes to get at least 3 loads, maybe 4 today. I'll be stacking all day long! Tomorrow morning we will be pouring the 40 yards of new concrete floor, then 1st of the week, James is bringing his log bucking unit with grappler arm to set the top run of block, which is too high for my Cat loader to place. Then it'll be time to fill with silage possibly by the end of that week, next week latest. I won't backfill the top 2 runs of blocks until I get the silage level that far to prevent pushing the wall in at the center. Pics later today.

#45 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted August 04, 2011 - 04:52 PM

Sounds good, Daniel. That pit should last for many a year. And I am sure you will be happy to get it done and filled. Just stay as cool as you guys can and be safe. I'll be lurking for the next update.




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