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Gave soldering a gas tank a try


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#1 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 09:22 PM

I remember seeing my grandfather & uncle repair steel gas tanks by soldering them . They had an electric iron and would use copper as a patch . I had two leaks one on the bottom from hitting the fan housing and the other was leaking at the seam . I tried epoxy ( JB Weld ? ) and it held for maybe a year . Borrowed a big old iron from work , solder and flux. Ceaned off the epoxy and tinned the areas and did the same with the patch . Had to redo the seam once but other then that came out OK for my first time , if it leaks I'll just try again :smile1:
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#2 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 09:30 PM

Good job there it won't leak.

#3 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 09:33 PM

Looks like some nice work Al! I didn't know that you could solder steel myself until a couple of years ago. That looks like a heavy duty soldering iron too!

#4 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 09:42 PM

They used to do a lot of gas tank repairs and radiators too , back then you didn't have the replacement ones like you have now . If you did find one they were $$

#5 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2011 - 03:38 AM

Hope it works good for you.

#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2011 - 05:01 AM

That should fix it permanently. I remember we soldered together steel boxes in Industrial Arts metal working class back in the 70's when I was in junior high. I had also forgotten about this method for repairing steel tanks. Thanks for posting this.

#7 massey driver OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2011 - 07:24 AM

We used to solder many a tank using copper like you did also using steel window screen.The screen works good as well,it helps hold and bind the solder together. Solder alone will just end up cracking.Looks good and you should have a trouble free tank.Larry

#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2011 - 08:36 AM

That should fix it permanently. I remember we soldered together steel boxes in Industrial Arts metal working class back in the 70's when I was in junior high. I had also forgotten about this method for repairing steel tanks. Thanks for posting this.


Yes,Me Too though it would have been in 64, first metal worrking project was to draw a box or scoop(I made a scoop, and used it to mix calf feed).
Then transer the drawing to sheet metal, cut it out and bend it to form a useful tool and solder it together.
At the time I thought it was pretty goofy? But can't tell you how many times I've fallen back on that experience over the years.

#9 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2011 - 08:44 AM

Yes,Me Too though it would have been in 64, first metal worrking project was to draw a box or scoop(I made a scoop, and used it to mix calf feed).
Then transer the drawing to sheet metal, cut it out and bend it to form a useful tool and solder it together.
At the time I thought it was pretty goofy? But can't tell you how many times I've fallen back on that experience over the years.


It's coming back to me now. We did the same thing only it was a funnel and a box. I was lucky IMO as a kid. My dad was in the refrigeration business and I went with him on many jobs and learned a lot of mechanical skills. I don't know if they still teach these basic skills in the schools now. The emphasis seems to be on computer skills, which are very useful, but are no substitute for being able to get hands on with a problem.

#10 massey driver OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2011 - 09:23 AM

I don't know if they still teach these basic skills in the schools now. The emphasis seems to be on computer skills, which are very useful, but are no substitute for being able to get hands on with a problem.


I don't know just yet what to say but this past year,my young guy had some projects to do for school. [Grade 7]These are what he picked to do .One was to build a chair and another was to take a motor apart and put it back together and it needed to run.They had to write up what they learned as well have pictures etc; of what they did.Now here's the kicker they got marked on this and it wasn't done it school. It was to be done at home in 4-6 week time frame.Now what bugs me is that isn't this what we send the kids to school for.Not to have them bring projects home for the parents to show and teach the kids to do.We'll see what happens when he gets into a higher grade.Like my wife said what would happen if the parents had no idea[like her] how to do this.I guess what the other thing was that the kids could partner up another kid.Seeing I'am able to do that stuff we didn't have a problem.Anyway like I said earlier the kids go to school to be taught not stuff sent home for the parents to teach.I should have put in for a wage.LOL Larry

#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2011 - 01:40 PM

I don't know just yet what to say but this past year,my young guy had some projects to do for school. [Grade 7]These are what he picked to do .One was to build a chair and another was to take a motor apart and put it back together and it needed to run.They had to write up what they learned as well have pictures etc; of what they did.Now here's the kicker they got marked on this and it wasn't done it school. It was to be done at home in 4-6 week time frame.Now what bugs me is that isn't this what we send the kids to school for.Not to have them bring projects home for the parents to show and teach the kids to do.We'll see what happens when he gets into a higher grade.Like my wife said what would happen if the parents had no idea[like her] how to do this.I guess what the other thing was that the kids could partner up another kid.Seeing I'am able to do that stuff we didn't have a problem.Anyway like I said earlier the kids go to school to be taught not stuff sent home for the parents to teach.I should have put in for a wage.LOL Larry


Well it might be better if you teach them to do it. I remember taking my 51 Desoto Club Coupe to auto shop class, Teacher showed us how to rebuild a carburator useing my car as an example. It never ran again till I replaced that carburator?

#12 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 06, 2011 - 08:42 PM

My brother used his GI bill to take night ag courses. The teacher was showing how to castrate, dehorn, etc. Had the cow in the headlock, but too tight.....it died right on the spot! :wallbanging:

#13 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 07, 2011 - 10:10 AM

That is disturbing Daniel!! It makes you wonder how someone so inexperienced could get a teaching job.

#14 lrhredjb OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2011 - 06:53 AM

That is disturbing Daniel!! It makes you wonder how someone so inexperienced could get a teaching job.


I guess that old saying comes to mind.
'Those that can---do. Those that can't---teach.'

Larry