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#1 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 07:34 AM

We had a pretty big storm come through and knocked my corn over , it was about 4' and I tried the best I could to stand them back up. The roots don't seem too deep . Do they "hill " the corn to keep this from happening ? Also I planted mine close , 12" between them , 4 rows about 15' long . Thanks , Al

#2 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 08:03 AM

In my experience from living on a farm years ago your corn will probably start to grow upright again from whatever tilt the stalks have now. We used to call this goosenecks. The corn will try to right itself but as it does it isn't coming up in nice straight rows and makes a mess of trying to use a corn picker or combine to harvest it. If you are hand picking it it wouldn't be as much of a problem. Hilling the corn doesn't really help in case of a bad storm. What happens is the soil gets wet and muddy and then the wind tips the corn plant over. Corn grows some outer brace roots but if the soil is to soft from the rain and the corn is tall enough for the wind to have a pretty good leverage against it you can have the corn go down. Also sometimes you can have insects that like to feed on the roots and weaken the corns ability to withstand the wind.
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#3 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 08:15 AM

Mike pretty much covered it. Hilling at a young age may help start them back straighter though. At this young size, there isn't much root structure, but they will fan out to help in the future.
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#4 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 10:28 AM

You have pretty well got the straight scoop. I have seen whole fields of corn blown down, a lot of money lost and a nightmare to harvest.
You could try standing them up and hilling them till the roots take hold and possibly salvage part of it.
since you don't have a lot, it might be worth a try.
This has been the worst year I can remember, to grow sweet corn. The Tall Corn State is not living up to it's name for me this year. First planting did not germinate, second planting does not look bad, Third planting about 1/2 germinated and the fourth planting just went in the ground Saturday. If the last planting grows it, it should mature in September.

#5 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 10:38 AM

You have pretty well got the straight scoop. I have seen whole fields of corn blown down, a lot of money lost and a nightmare to harvest.
You could try standing them up and hilling them till the roots take hold and possibly salvage part of it.
since you don't have a lot, it might be worth a try.
This has been the worst year I can remember, to grow sweet corn. The Tall Corn State is not living up to it's name for me this year. First planting did not germinate, second planting does not look bad, Third planting about 1/2 germinated and the fourth planting just went in the ground Saturday. If the last planting grows it, it should mature in September.


I am considering myself lucky. 2 Plantings and first is chest high and second made knee high.

#6 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 10:39 AM

Thanks guys , I guess I'll the ones that fell over alone , hope they take , they were looking pretty good considering the goofy weather we had this year . The second and third planting wern't tall enough to be affected by the wind but I might try using a "V" shaped hoe next time I weed to hill those a little , in case we get a storm like that again . Al

#7 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 01:50 PM

I am considering myself lucky. 2 Plantings and first is chest high and second made knee high.

Well I have to admit the first planting was a Big Gamble(and I knew it when I did it), planted it a little over 90 days ago
, with the hope I could have sweetcorn for July 4th. Then we got a bunch of cool wet weather and it never germinated. Should have waited until after May 10th to even try.

#8 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 09:06 PM

Here's what the corn used to look like , P7050324.jpg

Attached Thumbnails

  • P7010306.jpg


#9 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 09:14 PM

Here's what the corn used to look like , [ATTACH=CONFIG]17021[/ATTACH]looks like this now ,[ATTACH=CONFIG]17020[/ATTACH]


Al, you should be OK if stalks are not broke. Thought the corn was in a younger stage of growth where it has a better recover. Ride it out and you should still eat some good corn. Going in with a combine our chopper is not an issue with you.

#10 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 09:27 PM

Ducky , seeing the post of your corn , I could put all my 4 rows in between 2 of yours , I have mine way too close, but should still be able to reach my hands in to pick them . :smile1: :smile1:

#11 Dirtdoc OFFLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2011 - 10:53 PM

If I read your first post correctly, you planted your rows 12" apart. Correct? And how close was the corn in each row? Judging from your picture it looks pretty thick. When I plant mine, there is 30" between the rows and about 8 to 12 inches between plants. By having it planted too thick you will have weak spindly stalks, thus they will blow over more easily. Also by being too thick you will not get a nice size ear of corn, mainly nubbins. If you want to plant in 12" rows, space out the kernels to about 18 to 24". Good luck...Greg
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#12 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2011 - 08:45 PM

You guys where right and my corn came back pretty well . I took the picture the other day but just got around to posting it . Greg your right , the corn cobs don't seem as big as it was last year ( same kind ) hope they get big enough to eat anyway !
P7120383.jpg

#13 Dirtdoc OFFLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2011 - 09:59 PM

Alc, I think you will get some corn to eat. The color looks good and I don't see any weeds that would suck up your water and fertilizer. Do you sidedress your corn with nitrogen? An easy way to do it is to get a bag of 46-0-0 and then get a 1/2 gallon ice cream bucket. Drill a hole in the bottom, about 1/2'' or 5/8''. Fill it and let it dribble down the row. The amount your shooting for is 2 lb per 100 ft of row. Be sure to cover it with a little dirt or it will vaporize in the heat and you'll lose it. Greg
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#14 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted July 14, 2011 - 05:28 AM

Greg thanks for the "side dressing" tip , I only spread some 10-10-10 when I tilled it at the begining of the season , this it the section that I spread the compost over last year so maybe that helpped a little . Is it too late to side dress ? Not all the stalks have cobs on yet and there is another section that was planted 2 weeks later then the picture , Al

#15 Dirtdoc OFFLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2011 - 11:05 PM

Alc.. A good way to know if your corn is short on Nitrogen is to look at the lower leaves first... If they are nice dark green, you have plenty of "N" . If they are turning yellow from the outside of the leaf edge and working toward the middle,, then you are getting low on "N" . If 1/2 the stalk is looking that way, you're very short on "N". When the corn is taseling it is normally too late to apply N and get results. Being short on N doesn't ruin your crop, just means it could be a little better...Sidedress prime time is 6" to 12" tall...Greg
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