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Adding fluid to front tires & manual steering


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#1 Austen OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2018 - 06:30 PM

I'm considering filling the front tires on my Economy tractor which does not have power steering. For those who have added fluid to their fronts before, did you notice much of a difference in steering effort at slow operating speeds? My concern is that it could impede the steering more than a desirable amount, especially with a front attachment like a grader blade. I suppose I can fill them and if the results are not satisfactory, I can simply drain and refill them again with air but just wondered what the results were felt through steering from others who've done this before in a manual steer setup. Thanks!


Edited by Austen, February 11, 2018 - 06:31 PM.

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#2 Mark 149 J. OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2018 - 06:47 PM

That's a good questions Austen!  I've been wanting to fill the front tires on my 1811 as well but I hadn't thought about how it might effect the steering.


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#3 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2018 - 06:58 PM

I don't think you will ever put more weight then having a fel on it . I've never drove mine with it on but does steer harder then my Jim Dandy .   I can still use a spinner knob on the steering wheel except when you really load the bucket like I am with the jib boom on it post-1094-0-88976500-1480381190.jpg


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#4 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2018 - 07:55 PM

In the dirt I can see it being a problem. On concrete or pavement with a snow plow, I would think that it would make it easier to steer.
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#5 TUDOR OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2018 - 08:22 PM

The typical GT front tire only holds 2-4 gallons of fluid (20-40 lb), depending on the size. Considering the weight of a front blade, even 80 extra pounds is not going to have a major effect on steering unless it's iffy in the first place.

 

A GT FEL weighs 300-400 lb and is basically balanced on the front axle. THAT will affect steering effort as well as sink into soft ground with narrow tires, but loading the front tires is not recommended for FEL duty.


Edited by TUDOR, February 11, 2018 - 08:24 PM.

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#6 Austen OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2018 - 08:49 PM

Thanks, guys. I'll give it a shot see how it works out.



#7 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2018 - 09:14 PM

I was thinking more along the lines of a forklift with solid tires or an old car with manual steering, harder tires (more air in the case of the old car) making them easier to steer. And as with the forklift a solid tire is more likely to sink in the mud if you ride off the edge of the parking lot.... fluid fill the tires and top them off with air and they will in effect be more solid

#8 framesteer OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2018 - 09:33 PM

Keep in mind that the weight of the fluid in the tires, like wheel weights, is not supported by the wheel bearings, spindles, and tractor frame.  In soft ground, the extra weight of the fluid would likely increase the steering effort, but only slightly.  In firm ground or on pavement, the steering effort would would be very similar to without the fluid (assuming the pressure in the tires is the same with fluid and without).



#9 TUDOR OFFLINE  

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Posted February 11, 2018 - 10:24 PM

Fluid in the tires increases the ground pressure of the tire tread contact patch.

 

All other types of ballast, including wheel weights, increases the load on the tires which spread out to support the extra weight by covering a larger ground patch with relatively the same pressure as without the ballast, ie. the air pressure in the tires.


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#10 CRFarnsworth OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2018 - 09:27 AM

I'm considering filling the front tires on my Economy tractor which does not have power steering. For those who have added fluid to their fronts before, did

you notice much of a difference in steering effort at slow operating speeds?

I have two G.T.'s with loaded front tires.  One with Vredesteins' and one with Tri-Ribs.  Neither one has shown much difference in steering effort at any speed.      Rick


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#11 Bob White12 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 12, 2018 - 04:51 PM

just wondering how do you fill your tires? is there a special tool? 



#12 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2018 - 11:30 PM

look for a thread called "IV for tires"  it should give you the idea..... farm stores sell an adapter to go from garden hose thread to tire valve thread. lay it on its back, remove valve core and hook up the adapter and fill away.... it does take some time and you're best to have tubes within the tires.


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#13 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2018 - 12:44 PM

...and you're best to have tubes within the tires.

 

Why?

 

Seems to me that you would be best to not, that way if you run over a nail you can plug it externally.


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#14 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2018 - 01:14 PM

Tubes are better than running tubeless because with liquid within and directly against the inside sidewall they will tend to crack and dry rot sooner, meaning more leaks.  and if your beads aren't seated before filling all that liquid within the tire, well, will spray out between bead and seat.   also a barrier between ballast and the steel material of the rim.... cmon now if you get a hole in a tire you think you will catch it fast enough and plug it to keep your fill (or at least a good portion of it) from getting out? 


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#15 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted February 20, 2018 - 01:22 PM

cmon now if you get a hole in a tire you think you will catch it fast enough and plug it to keep your fill (or at least a good portion of it) from getting out? 

 

Yes, actually I do think I could keep most of it. Low PSI and plugs are quick repairs. But losing fluid isn't what I am worried about as much as the ease of repair.

 

A tire plug and refilling the 1/2 gallon that was lost versus taking a wheel off, breaking a bead, wrestling a nasty wet tube out from a stiff sidewall and small rim. Then you get to do all of that in reverse. Then completely refilling a tube.

 

Tubeless wins hands down in my opinion.


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