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My 1966 Bolens 1050 rebuild


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#1 bwern OFFLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2018 - 01:02 PM

Where to start? ... I fell into Bolens ownership .... over 10 years ago when we bought our house an old tractor and some miscellaneous parts were still at the house.  So with my packrat and dumpster diving ways, I said leave everything.  Several years later I happened to have a motorcycle battery handy and got this tractor to fire and run for a few seconds off of some fuel in the carb.  Since then, everything has just sat until now.  I started digging into exactly what this tractor was, saw some pictures motivating me of what it could be, and decided it was time to get going. 

 

The tractor is a 1966 Bolens 1050 and has always lived at my house.  The prior owner purchased it in 1966 and I have the original manuals from it.  In addition to the 1050, I have a snow blower (yellow), a mid-mount mower (green), and a snow plow (red).  I guess there isn't consistency in the color schemes. 

 

Is it pretty? No.  I thought the original color may have been some shade of orange.  However, from my initial inspection, it appears that everything is mostly intact.  I've got some work to do, but there don't appear to be major things missing or broken.  And it appears to be solid - the frame and sheetmetal just have surface rust, the footrests probably need the most work.

 

My goal is use it for snowblowing in the winter and tooling around in the summer.  I've got a larger mower and a larger tractor, but I'm sure we'll come up with some other uses for it.  Plus I like the restoring part.  My oldest vehicle now is a 1979 CJ7, so this will take me back a few more years.

 

Here's what I'm thinking for a timeline:

1) Start with getting the tractor running.

  • New battery (recommendations?)
  • Rebuild the carb (I bought a kit and am in the process - questions to follow!)
  • clean fuel tank/new fuel filter
  • prep the engine (oil change, mystery oil in cylinder?)
  • new spark plug

2) Do a compression test on the engine

3) General maintenance

  • change transmission fluid
  • replace/clean/rebuild belts/pulleys/wear items
  • change air filter

4) Get it operational

  • replace the throttle cable and choke cables
  • check all the wiring
  • new front tires
  • fix the lights

5) Start the restoration

 

Comments and input on this plan are appreciated!  What am I missing and anything else to be aware of?  Other maintenance items to take care of early on?

 

I found a great post with a guy restoring his and it showed all the great input from this forum.  I'd like to follow that same path.  I'll see how much I can get done before the warm weather projects start back up again.

 

 

 

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#2 framesteer ONLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2018 - 04:38 PM

Welcome to the forum.  You've come to the right place for help on your restoration.  In the Manuals section of the site, there will be technical manuals and parts catalogs for your 1050 and attachments.  You can download up to three manuals per day as a new member.

 

Answers to a few of your questions:

- the correct battery size is a 22NF.  I can get this battery at my local Farm and Fleet as a "commercial" battery (cost about $40, but only 2 yr warranty)

- the colors for your attachments are original and correct.  There are a lot of discussions in the Bolens forum on paint colors.

- the suppliers (listed at the beginning of the Bolens forum) are good sources for your parts needs.  They are very knowledgeable and helpful.

- the "transmission fluid" is originally 90W gear oil.  Don't use any synthetic substitute as the bronze bushings in the tranny don't mix well with synthetic oil.

- depending upon your compression check, it may be worthwhile to pull the head and inspect the cylinder and valves.  You should be able to see if the cylinder wall is OK as is or may have to be taken to oversize to remove rust, scoring, or normal wear.

- find the transmission gear adjustment procedure in the manuals section.  Perform this adjustment to prevent premature wear on the differential gears.

 

Just a few suggestions. 

 

Good luck on your project.  Keep in mind that these tractors are well designed and built. They are made to run a long time, and made to be repairable.  


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#3 logmillingman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2018 - 04:41 PM

:welcometogttalk: Well you came to the right place there are a lot of very knowledgeable guys here, they will be along shortly I'm sure.

 

Your 1050 looks good you should have no problem doing a restore.

 

Good Luck! 


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#4 Austen ONLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2018 - 05:48 PM

Welcome aboard, and nice post! That's awesome it came with the home you purchased and you've taken an interest in keeping it and getting it going again! Cool!

 

I'm sure that our sponsors will be able to help you out with parts.

 

Keep us posted! :thumbs:


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#5 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2018 - 05:55 PM

Welcome to GTT. The 1050 is a great tractor and you will be surprised how strong it is. Become very familiar with the controlls to include the left rear hub(limited slip traction adjustment). Enjoy the site and your new hobby. Good Luck, Rick

 

BTW; I recommend Marvel Mystery Oil added to your gas to clean, lubricate and protect you engine.


Edited by boyscout862, February 09, 2018 - 05:56 PM.

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#6 EricFromPa ONLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2018 - 06:37 PM

IMO the 1000 and 1050 were the best and most reliable tube frame ever built. The 1254 with the TRA12D would of been my top pic but the fancy solid state ignition was it's draw back. I've had 2 1254s and both of them had Tecumseh HH120 replacement engines in them.

 

I'm still looking for a decent 1000 to restore but I have been searching for years and there are none to be had in my area. Couple 800s and a 1050 now and again shows up forsale but that's about it.


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#7 bwern OFFLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2018 - 09:38 PM

I'd love one of the large frame (1250?) tractors because of their beef, but my 1050 seems to be a great size too.  I'm looking forward to being able to use it, but I also really enjoy the restoration part too assuming I don't get completely stumped.  But that's when I get to come to all you experts, right?  At some point I'll pull out the attachments and take some photos of those too. 

 

From the little I've started looking it seems like parts are a lot harder to come by, so its great that there are sponsors here I can try.

 

That's not a bad price for a battery.  Thoughts on buying an AGM?

 

I forgot that I also need to get the pin free to allow it to freewheel (?).  I've sprayed it a few times to try to cut the rust.  I believe I need to pull the wheel weight and passenger wheel to access it more easily?  I moved it to my garage by putting it in the bucket of my other tractor, but at some point I'll want to push it around by hand.

 

I'll do some reading on the transmission adjustments.  Are there any other major maintenance or adjustment type work I should be thinking about?

 

Ben


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#8 bwern OFFLINE  

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Posted February 09, 2018 - 10:34 PM

I purchased a carb rebuild kit, pulled the carb, and started carefully disassembling while taking pictures of every step.  I have a rebuild manual for the L-63 carb, but it seems very generically covering multiple carbs that I can't get a great description of this specific carb.

 

I was able to remove just about everything.  There are 4 things I did not/could not:

  1. The throttle shaft assembly (first photo)
  2. The choke assembly
  3. The fuel valve seat - large screw (second photo)
  4. Some sort of recessed jet (left side of third photo inside the horseshoe of where the float goes)

Will not removing/rebuilding any of these 4 items be a problem?  I've done a first round of cleaning of both the fuel bowl, throttle body, and venturi.  I've got to look to see what will be replaced and what else I need to clean.  Can the float go into the carb cleaner?  I can hear something lightweight loose inside if I shake it. 

 

Also to note, I found that the bowl and the throttle body are not warped and fit well unlike what I've heard about many of these carbs.

 

Ben

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#9 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted February 10, 2018 - 12:33 AM

I forgot that I also need to get the pin free to allow it to freewheel (?).  I've sprayed it a few times to try to cut the rust.  I believe I need to pull the wheel weight and passenger wheel to access it more easily?  I moved it to my garage by putting it in the bucket of my other tractor, but at some point I'll want to push it around by hand.
 
I'll do some reading on the transmission adjustments.  Are there any other major maintenance or adjustment type work I should be thinking about?
 
Ben
[/quote]

Yes, you need to remove the right rear wheel to remove the pin. Be very carefull that you don't break the casting that holds the pin to the axle. We have a formula, in one of the threads, for a homemade penetrating oil. It seems to work even better than PB Blaster. Take your time

One place to give attention is the bushing at the bottom of the stearing wheel shaft. Most times it is missed when greasing. With time it seizes and you can't stear.

Keep your eyes open for parts machines. I've picked up 2 that were put out with the bulky waste. Keep your eyes open for a 1250 also. They are my favorite GTs. Good Luck, Rick

Edited by boyscout862, February 10, 2018 - 10:55 AM.

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#10 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted February 10, 2018 - 08:53 AM

 Can the float go into the carb cleaner?  I can hear something lightweight loose inside if I shake it. 

 

 

Ben

 

If the float is original it is probably brass and the item inside is probably a small piece of solder.  Someone may have repaired it at some point and a drop of solder may have flowed inside or it could have been that way when it was made.  It should float when set in gasoline or other liquids.  I would suggest cleaning it with varsol and a scotch bite pad and then setting it in some varsol and make sure it floats on the surface - you can submerge it for several seconds with your fingers and it should float back to the surface.  Be careful that you are working in a well ventilated area and there is no open flame or in the presence of something that could produce a spark - safety first.   Do this a few times and then see if you can hear any liquid inside when you shake it.  If you hear liquid it probably has a hairline crack in it and will probably give flooding problems when you get things back together.

 

Check to make sure the throttle shaft is not worn and loose in the throttle body - too much play can let air in around the shaft.  if it is worn I believe you can still purchase a new bushing and seal kit that you can fix it with - this would require you to remove the throttle shaft.

 

This document that I put together is loaded in the Wisconsin engine manuals section and may help you with your carb as you put it back together -

 

http://gardentractor...or-information/ 
 


Edited by 29 Chev, February 10, 2018 - 09:01 AM.

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#11 blackjackjakexxix ONLINE  

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Posted February 10, 2018 - 10:35 AM

Welcome aboard,sounds like a good project, if you need anything just ask,I stock alot of new and used parts,as for the float if you need a new one Bolens 1000 on here can get that for you
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#12 bwern OFFLINE  

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Posted February 16, 2018 - 09:34 PM

I've tested the float, first for a few minutes in carb cleaner and then overnight in a glass of water.  Both times it floated afterwards.  However, the first time I cleaned it and left it to dry - the next day after shaking it carb cleaner showed up.  So the second time I left it under water for awhile longer to see if it would fill up and make sure there was a hole.  Same thing - it didn't fill up more than what appears to be a tiny amount, but after shaking it more carb cleaner shows up.  I think I need a new float.   


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#13 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2018 - 09:35 AM

I've tested the float, first for a few minutes in carb cleaner and then overnight in a glass of water.  Both times it floated afterwards.  However, the first time I cleaned it and left it to dry - the next day after shaking it carb cleaner showed up.  So the second time I left it under water for awhile longer to see if it would fill up and make sure there was a hole.  Same thing - it didn't fill up more than what appears to be a tiny amount, but after shaking it more carb cleaner shows up.  I think I need a new float.   

 

My experience has been that gasoline (or liquids like varsol) will leak into cracks that water won't as water is more dense than gasoline.  Depending on where the hole or crack is will affect how the float may perform in the carb.  If the hole or crack is near the top it may not bother the float much initially but as the tractor is driven on an incline or stopped and reversed the gasoline will have some movement inside the float chamber and may eventually work its way inside through the hole or crack.  I would suggest getting another float if you can't see and repair the hole or crack by soldering it.


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#14 Dukedkt442 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 17, 2018 - 10:15 PM

Great to see another project, I look forward to keeping track of it, it is a good motivator.  

 

Go on amazon and pick up a gallon of Ospho, it'll penetrate and free any and all rusty parts you could conger up.  Being water-based, it'll seep into places an oil-based product can't.  It'll also clean up that hood nicely, and be a great metal-prep once you begin the restoration.


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#15 bwern OFFLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2018 - 01:43 PM

That makes sense about the water vs. fuel/carb cleaner.

 

The hole in the float is somewhere mid-height on the inside of one of the cans and so it needs to be fixed.  I can generally tell where it is and might be able to guess where to add some solder, however maybe that would add weight and change the height of the float?  Any tips on how to solder it - glob it on the inside to make sure I cover the hole?  or is it better just to get a new float?






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