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#1 montejane OFFLINE  

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Posted December 18, 2017 - 11:18 PM

Hi, I'm from NE Missouri and am interested in buying a two wheeled tractor with a sickle bar to cut brambles around our place. Maybe to work up the garden also, instead of using our front tined tiller. I know nothing about these tractors but would be interested in a model that would have the greatest amount of parts and implements still available. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!

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#2 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 01:31 AM

Welcome to GTT.  When playing with these old machines, you are very limited in choices. Unless you want to spend alot of money, you are stuck with whatever comes up for sale in your area. Fortunately, you should be able to find a tractor in your area on CL. Another resource would be to go to tractor show/swap meets. In the mean time, look through our galleries and manuals to learn what you can. You will be suprised what friends and famly have hidden in barns and sheds. Ask around.

 

Two wheeled tractors, also known as "walkbehind" were popular in the 1960s and earlier. There were plenty of them around then. Try to find one that has the attachments that you want with it. Matching attachments can be difficult to find later. You should not have to pay much for a not running walkbehind. I got a 70 year old Bolens with sickle and bad engine for under $100 last summer.

 

Do not count out ride on GTs. You can find several brands of GTs that had sickle mower attachments. Look at Allis Chalmers, Bolens, and Simplicitys from the 60s and 70s. Good Luck, Rick


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#3 Eric OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 01:36 AM

They also still make 2 wheel tractors new today, they seem to be fairly sturdy and have quite a few attachments and obviously parts would be readily available.
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#4 jimmy G OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 04:23 AM

There is a lot to be said about your choice, budget would be first, in new you get what you pay for, a small garden and pesky brambles would not require an expensive top of the line tractor, in used, mechanical ability has to be addressed, some older walk-behinds were very popular with many interchangeable implement's/attachments, some like the David Bradley's were so popular that many people called all walk-behinds David Bradley's (like calling all snowmobiles ski- doo's or all personal water craft jet- ski's lol), your physical condition play's a role also in choice as some can be a handful, bigger is better for sickle work with long pass's and smaller is better for tight places and trim, a friend of mine has a small newer sickle bar walk-behind that dose a great job but shakes so hard he can only run it for 20 or 30 minutes at a time, a heavier tractor will not shake as hard
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#5 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 04:58 AM

Gravely.
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#6 jd.rasentrac OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 07:07 AM

First of all         :welcometogttalk: 


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#7 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 09:37 AM

Ditto, welcome aboard!


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#8 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 10:52 AM

BCS for new or used.


Edited by chieffan, December 19, 2017 - 10:52 AM.

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#9 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 12:03 PM

Remember to enjoy the search. General attitude around here is,  one is not enough, I plowed about 1/4 acre of garden with a David Bradly. It promoted a long narrow garden. Going down the furrow was wonderful, Watching the dirt turn in front of you, you see exactly how the plow is working and how and why to adjust it. Then you come to the end and it is time to turn around and go back, that is not a little boy job. I am sure if I had a better teacher than me it would have been easier but no such luck. the sickle bar worked great also. Living in western Washington at the time I never had the opportunity to try the snow plow.    Welcome aboard. Don


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#10 montejane OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 05:45 PM

Thanks for the comments. So which of the older models are easier on older bodies?:). I suppose that the heavier they are the less they vibrate? But if they are heavy, can they be handled by an old fart? My front tined tiller about kills me anymore.

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#11 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 07:59 PM

Thanks for the comments. So which of the older models are easier on older bodies?:). I suppose that the heavier they are the less they vibrate? But if they are heavy, can they be handled by an old fart? My front tined tiller about kills me anymore.

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Well, if you are an old fart like many of us, you really should consider an easier to use machine. I'm 66 and using a gear transmission with the armstrong(manual) lift used to be fine. Now I really appreciate the ease of a hydraulic or hydrostatic transmission and the power lift. It is also alot easier on the body to sit in a high back seat where you are safer and more comfortable.

 

You have thousands of options. Keep your mind open so that you can appreciate a good opportunity if it presents itself. Playing with these old tractors can be quite addictive. I have over 100 of them. They all have interesting aspects and quirks. I plan to cut the herd in half next year but it is a difficult addiction to kick. BTW because I look around, most of my herd were freebies. Ask friends and family what they have tucked away and you may just get what you want  and do them a favor by taking it away. When you are considering a purchase, post some picks of it on here for comments before you buy. Good Luck, Rick
 


Edited by boyscout862, December 19, 2017 - 07:59 PM.


#12 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 08:05 PM

Welcome to the site!! Most of us tractor nuts are opportunistic hunters and will buy anything we think is a good deal! I think the gravelys are great machines, but having never run a walk behind, and never owned one... my opinion is only worth 1 cent here.


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#13 montejane OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 08:13 PM

Well, if you are an old fart like many of us, you really should consider an easier to use machine. I'm 66 and using a gear transmission with the armstrong(manual) lift used to be fine. Now I really appreciate the ease of a hydraulic or hydrostatic transmission and the power lift. It is also alot easier on the body to sit in a high back seat where you are safer and more comfortable.

You have thousands of options. Keep your mind open so that you can appreciate a good opportunity if it presents itself. Playing with these old tractors can be quite addictive. I have over 100 of them. They all have interesting aspects and quirks. I plan to cut the herd in half next year but it is a difficult addiction to kick. BTW because I look around, most of my herd were freebies. Ask friends and family what they have tucked away and you may just get what you want and do them a favor by taking it away. When you are considering a purchase, post some picks of it on here for comments before you buy. Good Luck, Rick

We're the same age. Of your stable, which brands and models would you say would be the easiest to handle if you were using it as a tiller and as a sickle mower?

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#14 montejane OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 08:14 PM

Welcome to the site!! Most of us tractor nuts are opportunistic hunters and will buy anything we think is a good deal! I think the gravelys are great machines, but having never run a walk behind, and never owned one... my opinion is only worth 1 cent here.

I've seen a lot of Gravely's while looking. Maybe they would have the most parts/implements laying around in barns?

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#15 jimmy G OFFLINE  

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Posted December 19, 2017 - 08:23 PM

[quote name="montejane" post="810298" My front tined tiller about kills me anymore.

Sent from my SM-T560NU using Tapatalk[/quote] there are tricks to running forward tillers and W/B tractors that help alot, front tine tillers come with an adjustable drag stake, take it off and through it in the scrap, there is a happy medium (sweet spot) in all soil condition's for front tined tillers that lets the tiller do the work and you can't find it with a drag stake, when the tiller starts digging to deep lightly lift on the handles, this will increase bite on the tine's and the tiller will lift itself, when breaking ground or in hard soil the tiller will have to much bite, pushing lightly down on the handles will stop forward movement and let you ease the tine's down into the soil, the happy medium and forward movement in it is maintained by this light up and down pressure on the handles(soft soil requires more ground speed, hard soil less) , walk-behinds are all about balance, most are a little nose heavy to counter balance rear implement's, this can be to little,to much or just right depending on implement being used, if a rear implement requires lifting on the handles to keep it up in the soil then a counter weight is added to the front, if the implement has to be held down in the soil then weight is added in the back (on the implement it's self is best), this balance pays off in spades when you get to the end of the row and have to lift the implement for turning, Simplicity/Montgomery Wards tractors offer the most in old in many ways, if a newer tractor is considered then research parts and implement availability

Edited by jimmy G, December 19, 2017 - 08:24 PM.

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