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What size disc hillers are practical?


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#1 Doug E. ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2017 - 12:43 PM

I picked up a implement last summer that I think is a Brinley tool bar that was cut down from 5' to a little over 3'.  It has cultivator teeth on it currently.  I'd like to put a couple of disc hillers on it to use for bed forming.  I see that there are different sizes of discs available.  What size works best behind a Bolens large frame?  Tube frame?  Walk behind tractor?  I have never use these, but would like to take more of the labor out of our gardening, and this looks like the next step!

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

Doug



#2 ShotgunWedding ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2017 - 01:13 PM

They are quite practical for making nice raised bed/hills in a garden.  I don't think you need any specific kind of tractor to make it successful, any GT that has enough weight and traction to pull a normal cultivator or plough will be fine.  You'll need some weight on the implement if it is not naturally heavy.  On the GT, you need a bit of speed, just like a cultivator to do a good job and move the dirt where you want it to go.


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#3 Doug E. ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2017 - 04:59 PM

Thanks for the reply. 

 

What I am asking is what is the practical size for the 3 types of tractors I mentioned.  I have noticed 12, 14, and 16" dia disc hillers.  Will a large frame pull 16" dia effectively?  What sizes work best for H14 tube frame or a walk behind tractor? 

 

I have no experience with these, but would like to get set up to use the proper size before spring.  I probably should add that our soil is typically somewhat sandy.

 

Thanks,

 

Doug



#4 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted December 16, 2017 - 12:45 AM

You probably won't be using the hillers in virgin ground so any size would work behind any of your tractors.


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#5 Deerefarmer41 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 16, 2017 - 02:29 AM

I reconfigure the disks, on my disk to use as a hiller/bed former. Actually remove all but on disk and set them to a good angle. Really works good, is soft ground so need no extra weight. Not sure the size of the disk on a sleeve hitch unit, guessing maybe 10 inches. Getting the right angle and speed seems to be the ticket. Use it for making raised rows and hilling root crops like potatoes, etc. Save much time, can run up a 70 foot row in no time.
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#6 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted December 16, 2017 - 06:06 AM

I'll be watching this thread to maybe try something new next year . Doug will you mind telling us what size bed your trying to make , plants that will be planted and if your planing on using any mulch , plastic ect .   Thanks Al


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#7 coxhaus OFFLINE  

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Posted January 02, 2018 - 12:39 PM

A hiller sounds like a good idea to me.  I am old and tried of using a hoe.  This sounds like something I will want to do also.  I wonder if it would be better to run a cultivator at the same time off the same tool bar.  I don't own any of the equipment as of now.

 

I have noticed some of the disc have bearings and some don't.  I don't know which would be better using them for hilling. 


Edited by coxhaus, January 02, 2018 - 12:43 PM.


#8 Doug E. ONLINE  

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Posted January 06, 2018 - 06:47 PM

ALC,

 

I think we are going with 24" beds on 36" centers for most of the garden.  I'm thinking 30" might be better than 24, but the Mrs. wants 24 as they are not so far to bend over to weed. 

 

We are not using any plastic mulch.  I'd like to get things figured out to do with out it.  We are going to drip watering this year however.  Last half of last summer was very dry and hot, making it a challenge to keep things watered.  We will also cut the amount of water needed with the drip lines.  Another expected bonus is that we will not be watering as many weeds this way, either!

 

We were given some used row cloth cover last spring, and planted 2 identical rows side by side, one which we covered.  After 3 weeks, the covered row was about 1.5 times as high as the uncovered row, when we took the cover off and put it on the tomatoes.  By the end of the season, I could not tell the difference between the rows, except that the parsnips we harvested were still about 1.5 times larger.  When I stuck my hand under the cloth, the ground was noticeable warmer.  We are planning to cover most of our rows this year at the beginning to give all the plants a better start.  We ended up with the best crop of tomatoes we have had yet, btw, and the earliest off the vine as well.  We are in a cool climate with a fair amount of morning and evening shade on the garden.  We average about 19 days over 80 degrees in the summer. 

 

Regards,

 

Doug


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#9 coxhaus OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2018 - 03:20 PM

Where do you buy hillers for garden tractors?  Do you run cultivators at the same time?



#10 Doug E. ONLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2018 - 12:52 PM

I have not found hillers that are specifically for garden tractors.  I'd like to find some with a 3/4" shank, but am not sure if they are made any more.  I have been looking at the regular sized ones at Agri supply. 

 

I don't know if they are used with a cultivator or not.

 

D.



#11 sufiyasukh@gmail.com OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2018 - 05:11 AM

Noticed that the GB48 48" bedder that EA sells has 12" disks and the GB50 48" bedder has 14" disks. Both of them have two 3pt pin locations, a low one for SCUTs and a high one for bigger tractors.


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#12 Deerefarmer41 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2018 - 03:41 PM

Seems like you can buy individual disk blades from the garden tractor disk manufacturers. That is what I use and they work well. I use the disk frame and only mount one disk on each side.
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