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High efficiency furnaces


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#1 Kurtee OFFLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2017 - 08:00 PM

Just an FYI high efficiency furnaces can not take low thermostat settings. Low settings damage the heat exchanger which is not covered by warranty. This pertains to people who go south for the winter or have a second home and in the interest of saving fuel keep the thermostat lowered. Thermostat settings below 62 degrees can damage the unit. Just hoping to save someone else the tuition of this lesson.

 

KURTEE 


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#2 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2017 - 09:24 PM

Electric?

I don't see how a low setting would damage a gas, or propane.

Edited by toomanytoys84, November 06, 2017 - 09:25 PM.

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#3 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted November 07, 2017 - 08:15 AM

​I agree with above.  All a thermostat does is sets the temp that the heating unit will turn on/off.  Since "heat exchanger" was stated it must be gas.  We have a high efficiency furnace in our historical building which is closed through the winter.  That thermostat has been turned down to 50° f for the last several winters.  No issues. 



#4 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted November 07, 2017 - 08:20 AM

​I agree with above.  All a thermostat does is sets the temp that the heating unit will turn on/off.  Since "heat exchanger" was stated it must be gas.  We have a high efficiency furnace in our historical building which is closed through the winter.  That thermostat has been turned down to 50° f for the last several winters.  No issues. 

Must have been a poorly designed furnace with crappy materials..  The lesson here is you get what you pay for..


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#5 Kurtee OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2017 - 08:03 PM

This is a gas furnace. I understand how thermostats control the temp in the area. I fail to understand someone commenting poor design and crappy materials. This thermostat thing is listed in the manual for Lennox furnaces. I did not have Lennox. I am just trying to save some else the same fate. Bottom line is that todays furnaces are designed to last 20 years give or take. If there is anything you can do to extend the life I would expect that someone would want to know. You service these garden tractors and try to keep them going why not other things. My lesson is that I am paying prematurely. Perhaps a discussion with a heating contractor is needed.


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#6 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2017 - 08:58 PM

This is a gas furnace. I understand how thermostats control the temp in the area. I fail to understand someone commenting poor design and crappy materials. This thermostat thing is listed in the manual for Lennox furnaces. I did not have Lennox. I am just trying to save some else the same fate. Bottom line is that todays furnaces are designed to last 20 years give or take. If there is anything you can do to extend the life I would expect that someone would want to know. You service these garden tractors and try to keep them going why not other things. My lesson is that I am paying prematurely. Perhaps a discussion with a heating contractor is needed.

   It would be interesting to know what sort of failure your furnace demonstrated as a result of a low thermostat setting. Cracks, corrosion, warping, leaks, ? How was it discovered.  Don


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#7 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 09, 2017 - 07:40 PM

I worked in the HVAC industry and don't understand how a 62 degree setting wrecked a furnace.  I will say that high efficiency units recover so much heat that the water vapor condenses out from the combustion products and must be drained off.  Having a high efficiency unit in a poorly heated space might cause issues with that water freezing and causing damage.



#8 Kurtee OFFLINE  

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Posted November 09, 2017 - 07:43 PM

When this happens the heat exchangers rust and plug up and or fall apart. This furnace was in a farm home that was occupied by my parents before they passed on. After Mom passed 4 years ago the house was left at 55 degrees most of the time with the exception of weekends. (It has become my lake home with no lake) We had been having trouble with the furnace when we started the heating season this year. The furnace would cycle and produce heat and shut down with no restart. The furnace man who had installed this furnace made a trip out to check it for us on October 15th and could not get it to act up. 2 weeks later the same thing happened. (the furnace had been left off during the week) He came out again and checked, this time the furnace showed its symptoms. He did further checking and determined that the air switch was not closing due to reduced air flow. He thought plugged air intake, no such luck. It appeared that the primary heat exchanger was plugged. He did not want to jump to hasty conclusions and wanted to call his furnace supplier tech support first. They backed him up on this and a decision was made to replace the furnace. When he removed it yesterday both heat exchangers were rusted out. It had been explained by him that they are finding this type of issue with furnaces in the homes of snowbirds (people who winter in warmer areas) when the thermostat is set low to save fuel. The furnace does not cycle enough to dry out the heat exchangers and rust takes over.

 

KURTEE

 

Look up the Lennox manuals on line to read it yourself.


Edited by Kurtee, November 09, 2017 - 07:44 PM.


#9 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 09, 2017 - 07:52 PM

That explanation makes sense but seems like a poor design and bad parts if it rust out that fast.

My old oil furnace went from 1984 till 2015. It still worked great just drank oil faster than I could fill the tank

#10 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted November 09, 2017 - 08:02 PM

I have heard stories of this happening the last several years. No experience with it though. Another factor can be if it is not sized to the house correctly.

#11 DZG ONLINE  

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Posted November 09, 2017 - 11:05 PM

My dads propane furnace is circa 1956...
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#12 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted November 09, 2017 - 11:20 PM

That's why I'll keep my old furnace until I can't resurrect it anymore..  Seems anything new is built to fail or have faulty electronics built by the lowest bidder..  That way they get to sell you an over-priced piece of crap all over again..  The only reason the things fail is faulty design/construction..  Period!



#13 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted November 10, 2017 - 12:23 AM

I'm not real fond of the idea of having to replace this furnace when the time comes. Installed in the middle 80's and still going strong. Which reminds mind me it is time to service it again. 



#14 916hydro ONLINE  

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Posted November 10, 2017 - 05:00 AM

Mines been there since 81. That big green Williamson is a tank. I did have to put a new bearing in the blower last month but she's tough as nails. My grandmother has a Williamson that's been there since 59.

#15 DZG ONLINE  

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Posted November 10, 2017 - 07:20 AM

Im not sure who made my dads. Seems like all hes done to it since they moved there in 89 was service it and replace the blower.

Damn thing will make short work of a 500 gal propane tank though. He mostly heats with wood anymore.




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