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Spinning out pulling Brinly cultivator...


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#16 EricFromPa ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2017 - 02:06 PM

roper rt16    Cast Iron 16hp briggs

 

The Big and extremely heavy old Cast Iron 16hp briggs sitting on top of the front axle transfers most of the weight to the front wheels. My SS14 was 100% useless with the plow on the front untill I put a Crap load of weight o the rear. Seriously it would not even back up in the middle of the yard without spinning.

 

My yard is on a very very slight slope. Not 100% flat but very close to it untill ya get up near the alley then there is a Steep 10-15 foot hill.

 

That's when I made up 2 concrete wheel weights for it. 85lbs each. It Still spun with chains going up the steep part in the winter but atleast I could get it up out of the yard.

 

 

When in doubt bolt on More Weight.


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#17 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2017 - 02:41 PM

Too deep, as already said. The other thing is, You say plowed ground. Was it sod? If so and was never disked or tilled, you’d be pullin sod. In my area, it takes two years before the sod completely decomposes. This is in a field that has not been plowed in many many years.

Noel.
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#18 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2017 - 07:06 PM

My Brinly cultivator came with a depth gauge. Does your have one? Or do you have good control of hitch down-depth? Shorty is right, sounds like it takes 10' to sink in until she bottoms out, stopping you cold. You need something to hold the depth at a controlled setting either by a gauge-bar/wheel or on the hitch control mechanism.

I have a Johnny Products electric sleeve hitch allows my to set the depth anywhere I want in either mode so I don't use the depth gauge...but you may need to.

My 2 cents.


Yep depth gauge is a good idea... it's in my shop

#19 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2017 - 07:11 PM

Too deep, as already said. The other thing is, You say plowed ground. Was it sod? If so and was never disked or tilled, you’d be pullin sod. In my area, it takes two years before the sod completely decomposes. This is in a field that has not been plowed in many many years.

Noel.

This field I'm doing all this in was at one point was where all the deadstock was taken to from when my grandpa had one of the biggest pig operations in town, so the weeds grow pretty good, lots quackgrass and clover...

I plowed it earlier this spring and hit it with the disk and drag harrow, planted wheat and dad got to it with the chisel plow when he was out in the field. So I plowed it again to start over.

Edited by Greasy6020, October 13, 2017 - 07:11 PM.

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