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Bolens 855?


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#31 Dukedkt442 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2017 - 07:17 PM

Got a little more torn apart today; wasn't figuring I'd get into the transmission tonight, but there is that old saying of mice and men... definitely some damage, but I've seen worse.  The driveshaft brake hasn't worked in quite some time, so the effects of that are evident on the gears, particularly reverse.  There was some wear on the center of the brass gear that the worm drive contacts, which I definitely don't like.  I could blue the heck out of the gears with the welder, but I think I'll let sleeping dogs lie.  I'm also not the first person in there, judging by the starboard side shift fork.   :wallbanging:     There's a sheet metal tab off the clutch arm that has been wearing on the driveshaft (see the second to last picture).  What is its purpose, and how far off the shaft should it be?

 

Oh, I also discovered where more of the steering slop is coming from... who needs roll pins when you've got more thru-bolts (in the starboard side spindle).

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Edited by Dukedkt442, October 30, 2017 - 07:23 PM.


#32 Dukedkt442 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2017 - 07:50 PM

Got more torn apart today, not much left to come apart.  Check out that steering column!  Not sure yet what I'm going to do there; sourcing another, non-FUBARed column would also require a new steering wheel, as the splines inside the wheel are also non-existent.

 

I figured out what the tab above that was wearing on the driveshaft was for: when the clutch/brake was depressed, the tab would contact a switch (either a starting safety switch, or brake lights?).  Needless to say, when this goes back together, neither the switch or this tab will be part of it.

 

I found that where the PTO rod goes through its sleeve next to the console, the sleeve is a bit worn due to the rod's roll pins.  After I get the roll pins out (Bolens sure loved roll pins!) and remove the rod, I'll be repairing those spots with the MIG so that the PTO engages smoothly without hang-ups.

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#33 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2017 - 08:49 AM

Got more torn apart today, not much left to come apart.  Check out that steering column!  Not sure yet what I'm going to do there; sourcing another, non-FUBARed column would also require a new steering wheel, as the splines inside the wheel are also non-existent.

 

 

 

​Looks like you are making good progress.

 

Looked in the manuals section and did not see one for the 855 (G9) model but there is one for the 1055 (G10) which appears to be a similar tractor - this website page suggests using the G10 manual for the G9 model  http://www.magearu.r...me Tractors.htm

 

The G10 manual ( which can be downloaded here -   http://gardentractor...olens-1055-g10/    ) shows the steering wheel and shaft on page 12.  In the picture it appears that there are no splines on the shaft or steering wheel and that the wheel is simply retained on the shaft with a 1/4" x 2-1/4" roll pin (item #10) the same way that the gear is held at the bottom. If this is the case and the shaft is a standard diameter you could just buy a new piece of round stock steel and drill the two 1/4" holes in it.


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#34 Dukedkt442 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2017 - 07:05 PM

​Looks like you are making good progress.

 

Looked in the manuals section and did not see one for the 855 (G9) model but there is one for the 1055 (G10) which appears to be a similar tractor - this website page suggests using the G10 manual for the G9 model  http://www.magearu.r...me Tractors.htm

 

The G10 manual ( which can be downloaded here -   http://gardentractor...olens-1055-g10/    ) shows the steering wheel and shaft on page 12.  In the picture it appears that there are no splines on the shaft or steering wheel and that the wheel is simply retained on the shaft with a 1/4" x 2-1/4" roll pin (item #10) the same way that the gear is held at the bottom. If this is the case and the shaft is a standard diameter you could just buy a new piece of round stock steel and drill the two 1/4" holes in it.

 

Thanks.  I'll admit, I'm currently working my way through your 1053 has helped inspire my to under take this project this winter, instead of waiting until Spring.  I do have a G9 manual that I'd be more than happy to contribute to the site; I haven't, however, studied it over and inwardly digested it nearly as much as I should have.  The end of the shaft had looked hacked to me, so I naturally assumed it was cut.  The steering wheel was held on by a 3/8" bolt (you can see the hole in the column), which I'd assumed was also a hack job (as a lot of the repairs are, including the Stevie Wonder welds on the shift fork).

 

I just pulled out the manual, and you are correct good sir: the steering wheel is held on with a roll pin.  Unfortunately, the steering wheel hole is already hogged out, so in lieu of finding another wheel (which does has an intact, reddish FMC center cap and no cracks in the plastic), I suppose I could drill an appropriately sized hole at 90*, and fill the other holes with JB, and replace the shaft.  In fact, that sounds like a great idea, and probably what I'll do.  What's one more roll pin to heat and beat?  :rolling: I also noticed (and can be seen in the pictures) that the roll pin securing the steering linkage from the steering gear to the starboard spindle has been replaced with a larger bolt, which is where I have slop, so I supposed I'll be filling that with welding wire and re-drilling.  I don't have a drill press or hydraulic press, so it looks like I'll be acquiring both this winter.



#35 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2017 - 09:46 PM

The end of the shaft had looked hacked to me, so I naturally assumed it was cut.  The steering wheel was held on by a 3/8" bolt (you can see the hole in the column), which I'd assumed was also a hack job (as a lot of the repairs are, including the Stevie Wonder welds on the shift fork).

 

I just pulled out the manual, and you are correct good sir: the steering wheel is held on with a roll pin.  Unfortunately, the steering wheel hole is already hogged out, so in lieu of finding another wheel (which does has an intact, reddish FMC center cap and no cracks in the plastic), I suppose I could drill an appropriately sized hole at 90*, and fill the other holes with JB, and replace the shaft.  In fact, that sounds like a great idea, and probably what I'll do.  What's one more roll pin to heat and beat?  :rolling: I also noticed (and can be seen in the pictures) that the roll pin securing the steering linkage from the steering gear to the starboard spindle has been replaced with a larger bolt, which is where I have slop, so I supposed I'll be filling that with welding wire and re-drilling.  I don't have a drill press or hydraulic press, so it looks like I'll be acquiring both this winter.

 

Rather than drilling two new holes in the steering wheel you could make up two steel bushings that would press into the 3/8" holes and be 1/4" on the inside to accept a 1/4" roll pin.  Another option would be to take a 1/4" bolt and turn the head to 3/8" outside diameter in a lathe so that it would be tight in the 3/8" hole in the wheel and put a screwdriver slot in the head using a hack saw.  A 1/4" nut could be similarly turned on the outside to match the 3/8" hole in the steering wheel.  Install the wheel, bolt and nut using a bit of blue thread locker on the threads so that it did not come undone.

 

Just a couple of other options you might consider to reuse the original holes.  Make sure that you verify the orientation of the holes at each end of the shaft in relation to each other so that your wheel will be centred when going straight.
 



#36 Dukedkt442 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2017 - 07:50 PM

Rather than drilling two new holes in the steering wheel you could make up two steel bushings that would press into the 3/8" holes and be 1/4" on the inside to accept a 1/4" roll pin.  Another option would be to take a 1/4" bolt and turn the head to 3/8" outside diameter in a lathe so that it would be tight in the 3/8" hole in the wheel and put a screwdriver slot in the head using a hack saw.  A 1/4" nut could be similarly turned on the outside to match the 3/8" hole in the steering wheel.  Install the wheel, bolt and nut using a bit of blue thread locker on the threads so that it did not come undone.

 

Just a couple of other options you might consider to reuse the original holes.  Make sure that you verify the orientation of the holes at each end of the shaft in relation to each other so that your wheel will be centred when going straight.
 

I like the bushing idea; I'll give that an attempt.  I'll give it a try on the spindle first.

 

Made more progress today.  One of the brackets on the PTO rod that runs through the cast steering console is worn from the roll pin that it rides against as seen in the picture, so I needed to get it removed to repair it.  First choice was to pound out the roll pin that holds that spacer with the flat-spot on it, but after destroying two punches without moving the pin at all, I opted for plan B: cut the weld that holds the idler pulley bracket on the end of the rod and slid everything off that end.  Also removed all 4 tires from the rims; the fronts are pretty bad but should clean up.  The rears are clearly newer.  I was intending on reusing the tires to save money, but using the old "piece of wood and my truck" method of breaking the bead, noticed that the tire sidewalls are really dry-rotted; 3 tires had tubes.

 

I then set about removing the spindles from the axle, and the axle from the front cast frame.  The pin required several rounds of heat and beat to eventually persuade it, and once it did, discovered that it is worn where it rides on the cast frame, so I'll be replacing that with some round stock along with the steering column.  The PTO has a broken ear, and the bolt that would have been in that ear was broken nearly flush with the frame.  I hadn't noticed something else until this time, when I tried to remove the axle: the bolt opposite  the broken bolt was also broken, but this one was snapped half way through the frame and was sticking out the axle-side of the frame just enough to prevent me from removing the axle.  It's exposed threads were also flattened from making contact with the axle over the years.  Looking closely, I noticed that someone had attempted to drill it for an easy out, but gave up with the bit wandered, possibly toasting the threads in the frame.  I'd intended on welding a nut to the exposed broken bolt shaft (at the broken PTO ear) and hopefully remove it that way, but as I had my torch out, decided to use the heat treatment on both.  I clipped a pair of vice grips on the single exposed thread, and much to my surprise, the bolt spun right out!  I'd assumed that someone would have tried that in the past, or that the bolt had snapped for a reason, but apparently that reason was not resistance.  From its ease of removal, I moved the other side of the axle up as high as it would go, reached in between the axle and the frame with a pair of thin vice grips, and attempted to spin out the bolt towards the axle.  It too came right out.  Then, to make sure everything was on the up and up, chased all three holes with a tap; actually took several passes with the tap before I was satisfied that bolts will be able to thread in.  Lastly, I epoxied the cracked and broken plastic dash (I guess older models had metal?), but unfortunately, the starboard side corner is cracked completely off and gone forever.  Who knows, maybe I'll fabricate one out of metal.

 

Also picked up my paint today; I found a Rustoleum off-white which I will be using where G9s should have white.  Breaking from stock, I'm going with a deep blood-red for the wheels like the earlier tractors.  For the frame, I was torn between gloss black and metallic brown.  In the end, I ended up going with the black, liking the combination of white and black more than white and brown after looking at pictures of both while in front of the paint rack.

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#37 Dukedkt442 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2017 - 07:54 PM

Also looking over the broken shieve on the engine: I think I can repair the lo-range (smaller) shieve (the broken one), or at the very least will make the attempt (my spare is missing the entire lo-range shieve).  However, I also noticed that in addition to two separate sized shieves for the drive belt (lo and hi), there are 2 shieves for the PTO, but only 1 shieve actually on the PTO.  Was this to run the PTO at different speeds depending on the attachment, or did the extra shieve run to something else entirely?



#38 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2017 - 09:26 AM

Also looking over the broken shieve on the engine: I think I can repair the lo-range (smaller) shieve (the broken one), or at the very least will make the attempt (my spare is missing the entire lo-range shieve).  However, I also noticed that in addition to two separate sized shieves for the drive belt (lo and hi), there are 2 shieves for the PTO, but only 1 shieve actually on the PTO.  Was this to run the PTO at different speeds depending on the attachment, or did the extra shieve run to something else entirely?

 

If you have a dual sheave PTO assembly its very likely someone swapped out the original from another machine , your machine only should have one single PTO belt


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#39 Dukedkt442 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2017 - 08:18 PM

If you have a dual sheave PTO assembly its very likely someone swapped out the original from another machine , your machine only should have one single PTO belt

 

Thanks.  My spare is also a dual sheave (dang how I was brain farting on the proper spelling of that word  :poke: ).  As it is the only one I have, I'll "run what I brung" so to speak.  I don't think it should affect the alignment of the belts, as they'd all aligned before the engine came off.  I do need to look in the book for proper size of the engine-tube spacers, the ones on the tractor were at least 3/4", possibly 1" (I'd measured them but forgotten them).



#40 Dukedkt442 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2017 - 08:43 PM

Got some work done today on the clutch pedal bracket (through which the PTO engagement rod rides).  The one tube end was pretty chewed up from the roll pin eating into it, and the holes in the bracket were pretty hogged out.  I filled the holes with weld all around, constantly checking that the center remained where it needed to, and then re-drilled them, starting with a bit just barely to large to fit through the greatly reduced hole and then stepping up from there.  Each hole worked through about 8 bits.  I need to finish them up with my rat tail file... as soon as I find my rat tail file.  Then, I raised the chewed up end with weld by ~1/8", and used the bench grinder to bring it back down to 0.23" above the flat part of the bracket.  I used the cut-off wheel on my angle grinder to smooth the edges.  Then into the vice it went so that I could step up in drill bits up to 1/2" so that the PTO rod could fit through.  Apparently there were some very thin plastic bushings at both ends of the tube that didn't react well to the welder, so after I put the rod in, there was some slop which I didn't like at the other end, so I ran a quick bead around the inside edge of the tube to shrink its diameter, re-drilled, and ground out the outside face.  When I was decently satisfied, I hit up everything I'd ground with a 120 grit flap disk; primer should fill in any remaining grooves in the metal, and if it doesn't, I'm not all that worried.

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Edited by Dukedkt442, November 06, 2017 - 08:46 PM.

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#41 Dukedkt442 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 07, 2017 - 06:59 PM

Had a little time to strip down the front rims with a wire wheel on my angle grinder.  I'll hit them again with some sandpaper before spraying them with Ospho and painting them.  They're clearly not as good as if I blasted them, but I work with what I got.

 

Tomorrow I'll possibly finish disassembling the driveshaft from its sheave and mounting bracket, hoping to figure out why it takes effort to spin, and possibly strip the rear wheels.  The various clutch and brake rods need to be repaired where they've worn from rubbing, so that is also on the immediate to-do list.

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#42 Husky OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2017 - 11:50 AM

I must say that this thread is very informative you are doing some nice work. Thanks for the post.


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