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Carrots and Poblanos


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#1 ShotgunWedding OFFLINE  

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Posted September 25, 2017 - 06:54 AM

Took in our first planting set of carrots, went right into the slicer, bagged and frozen.

 

Also, picked a pack of poblano peppers, but we are now sick of them and gave the whole bag away to a family across the road that loves them.  We still have tons of sweet banana peppers, "Carmen" and a few sweet bell peppers, "Tomcat" still coming on strong.  The Serrano's are small plants...wish we had more as they are a nice hot variety that we have used more than we have for pickling.  

 

Oh...and I made a friend.

 

 

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#2 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted September 25, 2017 - 07:08 AM

We have tried carrots several times.  They always get worms in them so quit trying.  Cannot get anything but a few from peas or green beans either.  Has to be something in the soil.  Possibly to sandy? 



#3 Doug E. OFFLINE  

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Posted September 25, 2017 - 08:34 AM

Interesting on your results.  We have sandy soil, and the beans and carrots are two of our best performers.  We do have a problem with worms in the turnips, but not in the carrots, beets, or parsnips.  The biggest problem we have with sandy soil is keeping water in it.  We set a new record this year of 80 days without rain. 

 

D.



#4 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted September 25, 2017 - 09:51 AM

Nice harvest!  What variety of carrots do you grow?  I've always liked "Bolero", a very nice, tender, coreless variety that stores well into the following year under refrigeration.  Generally they average 8-10" and have strong tops that make pulling them a breeze....until the last couple of years.  Seems they have "new and improved" them and the yields have been disappointing and storage quality has gone down as well.  This year I tried a variety called "Prodigy" on a trial run.  They were huge, grown in a row next to the Bolero, so I don't think soil and water conditions were an issue.   Haven't done a taste test yet, and of course don't know what their storage quality will be.   Hot peppers were a disaster. Not enough pollinators, I'm thinking.



#5 ShotgunWedding OFFLINE  

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Posted September 25, 2017 - 10:13 AM

Hi Oldedeeres!!!

 

These are a variety called Neptune, an Imperator-style carrot, 8-10" root.  Long and thin although let them grow and they get longer and fatter.  Over the last couple of decades, we have grown many types of carrots without ever finding one that suited our conditions and tastes.  We always stuck with Nantes-style, but with poor success.  We trialled these maybe 3 years ago and haven't looked back since.

 

65 day maturity so we have a second later planting from July 13th that will be ready soon.  I dug up a few and they are perfect, but I want a bit bigger.

 

I get them from William Dam Seeds in Ontario.  If you want, I could grab you a packet and send to you early next year when we do our seed buy.

 

Peppers are picky!  Especially hot ones.  We did "ok", last year we had more than 20 families could use on two plants, this year we planted only one plant and am now short. 


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#6 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted September 25, 2017 - 02:47 PM

Did you have to cook the carrots a bit before freezing, Or frozen raw.  I like your friend, I have those friends here too!

 

Noel  

 

I use to plant carrots beside the house, at the back door. I called them Christmas carrots. I would plant in the spring and leave the carrots in the ground until Christmas day.  Some years had to dig down thru 5 feet of snow to get them. Ahh, the smell and taste of fresh dug carrots in the winter is just out of this world. I plan to start doing it again next year. 


Edited by propane1, September 25, 2017 - 02:55 PM.

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#7 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted September 26, 2017 - 02:30 AM

Thanks Shotgunwedding, I appreciate your offer.  Yes, I've heard of William Dam Seeds, believe I had a seed catalogue from them one time.  I'll root (gad, that's a bad one) through my old catalogues and see if I can find it. I'll look for Neptune in my other catalogues and see what I can find. Will P.M. you later.


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#8 ShotgunWedding OFFLINE  

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Posted September 26, 2017 - 08:24 AM

Hello Propane1.

 

We have done the blanching in the past but these frozen carrots like this, we only use for soups, stews and pot pies.  We have found it doesn't matter whether they are blanched or not, so we don't anymore.  What is your experiences?

 

Excellent idea on the Christmas carrots, may need to try that next year.  Do you plant later that the "normal" summer/fall carrots?  I also love the earthy smell and taste of a fresh carrot in the winter. 


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#9 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted September 26, 2017 - 04:00 PM

I have never froze carrots. Sound like a good idea.

I just plant at the same time, about mid May around here, but I use a longer maturity type.

Noel

That's where I plant the carrots. I'm gunna plant a little lettuce for sandwichs too, this coming year. The other side of the door looks the same. So I'm gunna plant potatoes there.

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Edited by propane1, September 26, 2017 - 04:58 PM.


#10 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted September 27, 2017 - 12:14 PM

That's a handy place for a kitchen garden Noel. Have you ever tried planting lettuce and radishes there in the fall?  Fall planting makes for a nice early salad come spring, and they'll be used and gone before you put your carrots in.


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#11 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted September 28, 2017 - 08:03 PM

Oldedeeres, Say that's an idea. About how late in the fall. And what type of lettuce. I like lettuce on sandwiches. Not a big fan of radishes, but will eat some.

So they will survive the winter and come up in the spring. ?

Noel

#12 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted September 29, 2017 - 02:21 AM

Yes they will, as long as they don't go through too many freeze-thaw cycles.  If your climate varies a lot over winter just mulch over the row until spring is almost here, then rake it off and let nature take it's course. The seeds will germinate as soon as the ground temp. is right.  I have fall planted carrots, peas, radish, parsnips, tomatoes, lettuce of many varieties, garlic (of course), even onion sets.  Biennials, like carrots and beets sometimes are fooled by being frozen and will set seed, but usually I get enough that don't to make the experiment worth while.  I plant as late as possible, just before winter really sets in and the ground freezes. Here that is late October/early November.  You don't want the seeds to germinate before winter settles in for good. Some years I have great success....it varies from year to year depending on weather, quality of seed, ground moisture, etc. etc.  


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#13 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted September 29, 2017 - 12:46 PM

Thanks so much, our winter settles in around the middle to the end of November.

Noel
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