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PTO switch repair


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#1 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2011 - 10:39 AM

I have been working on the butchered wiring of my JD314 and found that the PTO switch was defective. A PO had rewired it to use the safety contacts to run the clutch and bypassed the safety switch wiring. I could not get a low resistance reading on the safety or operating contacts. I took the switch apart and it was dirty but otherwise looked ok. Don't take one of these apart unless you have to! There are 6 springs, 2 detent balls and a few other parts inside. I did manage to get it back together but still had a connection on only one side of the switch. I checked directly to the rivets and had a connection. There was corrosion buildup between the copper rivets and the 1/4" terminals. I soldered all 5 of them and now the switch reads good on all contacts. So, it looks good to go. If you have a switch that's bad try this fix first. Just make sure you clean the area well before soldering.
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#2 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2011 - 04:51 PM

Good tip Brian. I am glad you got the switch back together. That is usually one of those things where once it comes apart pieces go flying and it never makes it back together except in the garbage. At least that is my luck with the stuff LOL.

#3 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2011 - 05:54 PM

I won't even try to take a switch apart, if it doesn't work right, trash it and get a new one. That's my feelings on this.

#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 22, 2011 - 05:15 AM

I guess my point here is that you should check the rivets on the back for conductivity to the terminals and resolder them before taking it apart or giving up on the switch. It may have been fixed by resoldering alone which means it wouldn't have to be taken apart. The switch costs $30.13 from JDparts so I thought it was worth a shot at repairing it. I work in the laboratory instrument repair industry and have to do this sort of thing a lot in old equipment where parts are no longer available. Sometimes you get things to work, other times its a lost cause.

#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted June 22, 2011 - 05:24 AM

JDBrian, now I can see where you would jump in to something like this. If I tried it, I'd probably loose most of the innards as it came apart, or not be able to figure out how they went back together. Maybe a photo tutorial would help others understand what is inside of these switches? Care to do one?

#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 22, 2011 - 10:13 AM

Good tip Brian. I am glad you got the switch back together. That is usually one of those things where once it comes apart pieces go flying and it never makes it back together except in the garbage. At least that is my luck with the stuff LOL.


George, I hear you. Been there many times. Whenever something flys apart like that the laws of physics are violated and the most important parts will disapear forever. This wasn't really that bad. It sort of popped apart gently with all the parts staying in the switch and leaving enough clues to get it back together.
I feel the real problem was outside the switch and easily fixed.

Edited by JDBrian, June 22, 2011 - 10:20 AM.
Typo fix


#7 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 22, 2011 - 10:19 AM

JDBrian, now I can see where you would jump in to something like this. If I tried it, I'd probably loose most of the innards as it came apart, or not be able to figure out how they went back together. Maybe a photo tutorial would help others understand what is inside of these switches? Care to do one?


Hi Kenny
I've never seen another switch like this one. It had a patent number on it and was a very clever and long lived design. The contacts were barely worn at all. Without another one to take apart I couldn't take any photos to do a tutorial. Mine is back in the tractor as I had a few hrs. last night to work on the wiring. I'm building a seat switch for the replacement seat that is on the 314. Perhaps I should document that?

#8 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted June 23, 2011 - 03:49 AM

With not knowing what is inside these switches, it makes it a little harder to take them apart and getting them back together properly. I tried one years ago, but it never worked again correctly. LOL That's why I don't try to take them apart. Plus my soldering skills are on the poor side, usually melt more plastic than solder.
Thanks. If you get into another, maybe we could get some pics then. Or I can mail you one I have to fix.

#9 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 01, 2011 - 04:59 AM

Just an update. The switch and clutch are back in the tractor and are working fine. So it is possible to save 30$ and repair the stock switch to keep it original and keep the safety interlock.

#10 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 01, 2011 - 06:50 PM

Good tip Brian. I am glad you got the switch back together. That is usually one of those things where once it comes apart pieces go flying and it never makes it back together except in the garbage. At least that is my luck with the stuff LOL.


Yep, when going into a switch, ya better have your workbench & floor spotless!

#11 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 02, 2011 - 02:01 PM

What bugs me the most is that the PO butchered the wiring to bypass one side of the switch that must have been faulty. By the time I got the tractor the second half wasn't working either. Most likely soldering the back terminals to the rivets would have fixed it. Hopefully more people can give that a try after seeing this thread.

#12 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted July 02, 2011 - 02:46 PM

Actually, when anyone buys a replacement switch, it would be wise to go ahead & solder all terminals right then & there while everything is clean. Once soldered right, it would never lose it's connection there ever.

#13 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 03, 2011 - 08:15 PM

Actually, when anyone buys a replacement switch, it would be wise to go ahead & solder all terminals right then & there while everything is clean. Once soldered right, it would never lose it's connection there ever.


I agree if a modern switch were constructed in the same way and the person doing the soldering had some experience with electrical work. It's easy to overheat a part like that and damage the insulator/back plate of the switch or some internal parts. I'm not sure they build them like that anymore.




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