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My home made jig for rolling 16 gauge sheet metal.


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#1 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2017 - 01:09 PM

I had to come up with a way to roll the edges of a 4' long piece of 16 gauge sheet metal. I watched a youtube video of guys rolling 22 gauge sheet metal using a pipe, bolts, and a couple of screw drivers. I knew the 16 gauge would be tougher to roll and I needed a tighter radius. After the tight radius, I needed a flat area. To accomplish this, I welded a piece of angle to the pipe and 4 braces to tie it together good. I left enough room on the sheet metal for the tack welds and I'll trim the edge away where the welds were later on. After tacking the sheet metal to the jig, I laid it flat on the deck and used two big adjustable wrenches to roll the edge over. It took some effort, but it worked like a charm! Longer levers instead of adjustable wrenches would have made it easier. Now I have to take some measurements to roll the other edge exactly where it needs to be. After the other edge is rolled and both edges trimmed, I have to make notches and make a 90° bend. This will be the hood for my 1960 Page tractor that I'm restoring. Hopefully I don't screw this hood up and it ends up on the scrap pile, HA! I'm learning as I go with this sheet metal work. Anyway, If you have to roll a piece of sheet metal, this works well!

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Edited by classic, July 10, 2017 - 01:10 PM.

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#2 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2017 - 01:13 PM

This is basically the same hood that I have to make.

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#3 sharkman OFFLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2017 - 01:53 PM

looks great!


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#4 tater195 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2017 - 02:07 PM

Do some test bends with some scrap if you have some to find out what the "take up" is. If you measure to where the edge should be then bend it, it always seems to come up short. You can also measure to where the radius starts and work backwards to find out where you need to clamp it.


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#5 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2017 - 02:25 PM

Thanks tater! I've been studying it and what you are saying will do the trick. I'll be making the second bend tomorrow since I don't have time today.
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#6 Eric OFFLINE  

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Posted July 10, 2017 - 11:39 PM

The term for that is bend allowance and there is an equation that gives you the measurement for the length of the radius. Hope this helps sorry I don't recall the math it has been years.
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#7 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 12:11 AM

Thanks Eric. I'm sure that the equation for the bend allowance would be pretty simple to find. I'm curious, so I'll look into it. I've tinkered with a little metal work while restoring some of these old machines,but I haven't done any real sheet metal work. This hood is a simple design, but I don't have the right tools for this sort of thing. It's fun taking junk that's laying around and making it into something to get the job done, though.
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#8 Eric OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 12:19 AM

I totally agree, taking items laying around and making them into something useful is very rewarding. I was an airframer in the navy, I specialized in hydraulics but also was a metal worker and fabricator . I miss having the militaries equipment at my disposal as it was nice to be able to have unlimited resources at your fingertips. Bend allowance is pretty straight forward and should suit your needs well. I was impressed with your home made sheath metal break. Good luck with your project!
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#9 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 07:40 AM

Thanks Eric and thank you for your service. My father, Grandfather, and two Uncles were in the NAVY. My Dad was on the carrier Lake Champlain during the Cuban Crisis, my Grandfather was on LST 907 during WW2, one of my uncles was on an oil tanker, and my other Uncle was on a gun boat cruising rivers in Vietnam. I grew up around a lot of interesting conversation about their experiences. My Dad and grandfather both worked in cement plants for quite a few years as mechanics, so they were always tinkering with something in the garage. I guess somebody has to has to carry on their "build it out of scrap" way of doing things, heh! I enjoy the heck out of it!
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#10 tater195 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 10:05 AM

I have recently invested in some of the lowend metal working tools. I decided to buy tools instead of buying fixer upper GTs.

 

The small English wheel has some lateral flex and alot of slop on the cheap bearings but will get the job done on the thin gauge stuff. The adjustment T handle isnt as user friendly as the foot wheel on the bigger units.

 

The bead roller has lateral flex too but can be braced with welding on some angle iron. The starter dies will cover the basic stuff, but will need to buy expensive dies to do the advanced forming.

 

12" slip roll works good but limited to smaller pieces. 

 

The small shrinker/ stretchers work decent with the supplied handles. The suggested stand with foot pedals is pricey but make them easier to use.

 

I also bought  hammers, shot bag, hydraulic knock out set, power nibblers and shears. All for less than what 1 GT restore would cost. All that combined with the mig welder, plasma cutter, tube bender, shop build 4' brake and slip roll, and press really opened up the potential for future shop projects. I have always built stuff from spare parts, but now they are starting to look store bought instead of junkyard jalopys.  

 

I built both of these smokers in the last few months. The small cube smoker was built from 16 ga. 

20170401 192207

Edited by tater195, July 11, 2017 - 10:11 AM.

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#11 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 10:29 AM

Well, I went ahead and made the second bend. I needed the inside width of the hood to be 13 1/2", so I propped up the jig where it would end up after the second bend. I then rolled the jig down onto the sheet. I moved the jig 1/8" past the line and tack welded the jig in place. After rolling the sheet, I ended up with 13 1/2" inside to inside. Thanks for telling me that things usually come up short, tater! The 1/8" that I added made all of the difference and the hood fits the mounts like a glove. Now to make the 90 degree cutouts to make the final bend. Still a long way to go to finish this up.

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#12 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 10:31 AM

Nice job on rolling the metal. turned out nice.


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#13 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 10:41 AM

Thanks Cvans, it took all I had to make this second bend. I must have had more coffee in me yesterday, heh! I'm done with the jig for now, but I do have to make a similar hood for another tractor. I'll be making long handles to attach to the jig for when I use it again.

#14 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 10:49 AM

You made a great decision buying the tools that you bought, tater. I'm sure it makes metal working much more enjoyable now. Great job on the smokers! Fabricating things can be addicting and makes for a great hobby or even a business. Some day I'll build a decent shop, since I'm sure that I would get a lot of use out of it.
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#15 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 11:02 AM

Like your idea but I've been racking my head trying to figure out a way to hold the metal without welding it to the former. Maybe removable clips or another piece of angle iron bolted to the first so it would leave a space to slip the edge of the sheet into. Your radiused corners would add a lot of strength compared to corners made in a metal brake. 


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