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1050 restoration, paying the tractor back!


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#46 LRCXed ONLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2017 - 02:40 PM

I started out this morning to pull the motor and then one part at a time to get them ready to restore/paint. Things didn't go that way though. I started out at 8:30, and just couldn't stop. By 12 noon it was all apart as you see it here. I was pretty lucky that nothing was broken of any bolts broke. I guess it's paid off over the years to keep it covered up when not in use.

 

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One thing I found interesting while taking it apart. During the years of using this tractor, when ever I turned the steering wheel the clutch peddle would move at the same time. I always found that kind of strange. Well, as I have been using 29 Chev's 1053 post as a resource and reference along the way, when I went to remove the nut on the front of the drive assembly, there wasn't one there. Now I understand why the peddle moved when I turned the wheels. The whole assembly was moving in and out.

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Now it's time to package everything up and make a list of bushings and bearings etc. that I'll need to order. Then start cleaning up one section at a time. The motor will be taken care of after I get the rolling frame back together. But that'll take time due to other jobs that have been coming in.


Edited by LRCXed, July 22, 2017 - 02:41 PM.

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#47 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2017 - 03:21 PM

Sometimes when you start to take things apart it is hard to stop - looking good.

 

Don't see much evidence of the drive shaft moving inside the bearing going by the rust in the picture.  Another reason that the clutch pedal might move when you turned the steering wheel could be that the steering gear and arm are seized to the shaft that the clutch pedal mounts to - just a thought.  

http://gardentractor...roject/page-6?  post #76


Edited by 29 Chev, July 26, 2017 - 07:02 AM.

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#48 LRCXed ONLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2017 - 03:47 PM

The steering shaft wasn't seized up. It came out pretty easy after sliding the bushing out of the way to get the shaft out. Needs new bushings and a rebuild of the end of the shaft due to wear. So it was pretty loose.

Looking at the end of the shaft where it rides in the bearing I can see it's been slide half way back for most of it's life. At least while I've owned it. You can also see that evidence inside the bearing itself. The arrow shows where the front of the shaft was riding. The front is rusted like the back edge of the shaft.

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#49 LRCXed ONLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2017 - 05:46 PM

I got up early today to do some cleaning and glass beading of parts in preparation for repairing and painting. My blasting cabinet is outside, and the temps today are supposed to be in the low 100s. So an early start was called for. I got quit a bit done though before the sweat started dripping on the glass of the cabinet. Some of the parts will go straight to painting, but others still need to be rebuilt with new bushings etc. But cleaning them up first seemed like a good idea. My shop is cooled with an evaporative cooler, so I'm storing the blasted parts in the house so they don't get a rust film on them before I paint them. These are a few parts I got cleaned.

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One thing I found interesting is that someone in the past has drilled a second set of holes behind the stock position for the clutch/brake plate to be moved towards the back. My GUESS is that they did it due to the front shaft nut not being there and allowed the shaft to move backwards during use. These added holes may have been to make up for the difference. They may not have known there should be a nut at the front of the shaft. I'm not sure about it though, just a theory. I'm going to weld up the additional holes, and am hoping it all goes back together correctly and adjusts the way it should when I'm done. Here's the extra holes drilled. Looking back at pictures I can see where it had been moved back.

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I was hoping to paint the parts today, but we'll see if that happens depending on how long it takes me to set up and weld the holes shut. I have to cleanup the rust pits from past battery acid dripping on this plate too. Since it's not structurally compromising, I'm going to fill the pits with body filler like I was filling a dent in body work. So it may not be till tomorrow before I do any more painting.

 

Your thoughts on the extra holes would be welcome. But I think this also is an answer to why the shaft bearing always road in the rear half of the front carrier bearing.

 


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#50 LRCXed ONLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2017 - 08:27 PM

I did push through this afternoon and welded up the extra holes. Once I got them ground down flat I glass beaded over it all again and focused a lot on the corrosion pitting so I could make sure the body filler had a good bond with no rust at the bottom of the pits. With the filler spread on the pitted ares I put it out in the heat of the day to cure the filler really hard. With areas like this, if you sand it too soon the filler won't bond and can be pulled out of the area. When it was cured I used a DA sander with 120 grit followed up with 220 and 320 grit to smooth out the surface and get it ready for primer sealer. I'll let the sealer sit for an hour or so, then lightly sand the surface so any imperfections are smoothed out before painting.

It's too late tonight to do any more with these parts. So I'm hoping to get all of them finished up and painted tomorrow. BTW, the decal set I bought didn't come with the option of having the correct model # printed on the new decal. So I'm attempting to protect the original since the #s can still be read. I'd like the true model and serial # to stay on this restoration.

 

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#51 Austen ONLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2017 - 09:08 PM

Nice progress!


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#52 LRCXed ONLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2017 - 10:37 PM

Thanks Austen.

 

Not wanting to loose the rest of the day, I pulled out my pressurized Harbor Freight sand blaster and blasted the two frame rials out in the back yard. I usually set up a booth to blast parts with it so I can recover the sand used, but I didn't this time. Like the other body plate I discovered slight rust pitting on the rails. Again, I filled the pits with body filler. If I had used the welder to fill all the pits it would have warped the rails with the heat of all the welding and grinding needed. If the rust pits had been all the way through the rails it would have been a different story. But they weren't deep enough to compromise the integrity of the rails.

After blasting them I filled the pitting with body filler and will let them sit till tomorrow before I sand them down and get them ready for paint.

 

All sand blasted and cleaned up. Then the rust pits showed up.

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A thin coat of filler laid on that will sit till tomorrow and get sanded down.

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Well, that's it for today. Time to make dinner and start all over tomorrow. Hope to get some painting done then.


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#53 LRCXed ONLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2017 - 12:10 PM

Yesterday was a long busy day. I started out getting the tubes and mounting plate body filler sanded down. Then I sprayed a couple coats of high build primer on them so I could sand them down nice and smooth. While those dried I got more parts blasted and ready to paint. Total of 26 parts. By the time everything was cleaned and prepped it was mid afternoon and I still need to sand the primer on the tubes and plate. Then I set up my 10x10 shade canopy to hang parts on it to paint them.

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With parts ready I sprayed epoxy sealer on them. They needed to sit for an hour though before I could spray the brown. Needless to say I was swapping parts out as I got one batch done. I hung the finished parts on a wire I strung under the patio cover and went on to spray the next batch. By the time I was able to spray the brown it was getting late and I was running out of sunlight. But I got most of them sprayed before it got dark, but the larger parts ended up being painted after the sun went down. It wasn't fun painting a dark color in the dark using a flashlight. But I found a neat trick to see if I got them covered enough. I took flash pictures of them to see if there were light areas that needed more paint. It worked really well too. As you can see on a couple parts it showed up really nice that I needed to spray another coat. By the time I was finished painting it was 10:30 and I had parts hanging everywhere. As I was hanging a part I backed into the plate that was finished and messed up the corner. That needed another coat as well as masking off the decal again with the paint still wet, making the day even longer.

 

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Well, that was my day yesterday. I ordered another batch of parts from Brian that should be here by tomorrow. But for today I'm going to clean up the shop and MAYBE get mare parts prepped. We'll see! I still need to pull the steering column apart as well as the front steering/wheel assembly, and the drive shaft/clutch assembly so I can replace the discs. And then there's the steering gear shaft. It's worn on the end and I need to decide if I want to weld it up or cut and replace that end with a new section.

 

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#54 LRCXed ONLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2017 - 04:17 PM

Cleanup day didn't go too well. The first thing I picked up ended up being the steering column, and I ended up tacking it apart. It wasn't too bad, but one of the drift pins ended up flying across the shop to be discovered later. Just like the one in 29 Chev's post, the lever block was stuck. I ended up putting the whole thing in the press and still needed heat from the torch to get it to move, but it did come apart without hurting anything.

Since I had the press going, I set up the steering gear shaft and pressed that apart too. But it took a lot more heat to get it to start moving. I was really starting to wonder if it was ever going to move.

 

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Before I pressed the steering shaft out I noticed there was a key way cut in the gear itself. After it was apart and cooled down I realized there was no key in the shaft. So my question here is, are these two gear parts supposed to be floating on this shaft? If so, I'm surprised there's not a grease fitting in them to keep them lubed. I cleaned off a little bit of the rust on the shaft and it slide in the gears by hand. Help me understand this please?

 

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#55 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2017 - 07:34 AM

 

Before I pressed the steering shaft out I noticed there was a key way cut in the gear itself. After it was apart and cooled down I realized there was no key in the shaft. So my question here is, are these two gear parts supposed to be floating on this shaft? If so, I'm surprised there's not a grease fitting in them to keep them lubed. I cleaned off a little bit of the rust on the shaft and it slide in the gears by hand. Help me understand this please?

 

 

The gear is made with a key way in it but there is no key in the shaft.  I believe originally it was designed to turn on the shaft along with the arm but if the tractor was left outside exposed to the elements they often seize on the shaft - the same with the PTO pivot.  If it is seized the shaft and gear turn whenever the steering wheel turns and you can sometimes feel the movement in the clutch pedal as the shaft rotates in the clutch pedal bushing along with the two bushings in the main support.  The keyway may have been used to index the gear when the teeth were machined in it or the keyway may have been incorporated into the design in the original concept but found it was not required or it could be the gear was used on another application earlier that required the keyway - that may remain a mystery for you to solve if you wish a definite reason. The gear and arm do not rotate very fast so if you lubricate them with grease when they are assembled it should be sufficient. I would also recommend that you lubricate the PTO pivot on the shaft when you put it back together and make sure that the hole is open to the shaft where the spring goes as you can put a few drops of oil in the hole periodically to lubricate the pivot on the shaft.    
 


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#56 dtsh OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2017 - 09:53 AM

The gear is made with a key way in it but there is no key in the shaft.  I believe originally it was designed to turn on the shaft along with the arm but if the tractor was left outside exposed to the elements they often seize on the shaft - the same with the PTO pivot.  If it is seized the shaft and gear turn whenever the steering wheel turns and you can sometimes feel the movement in the clutch pedal as the shaft rotates in the clutch pedal bushing along with the two bushings in the main support.  The keyway may have been used to index the gear when the teeth were machined in it or the keyway may have been incorporated into the design in the original concept but found it was not required or it could be the gear was used on another application earlier that required the keyway - that may remain a mystery for you to solve if you wish a definite reason. The gear and arm do not rotate very fast so if you lubricate them with grease when they are assembled it should be sufficient. I would also recommend that you lubricate the PTO pivot on the shaft when you put it back together and make sure that the hole is open to the shaft where the spring goes as you can put a few drops of oil in the hole periodically to lubricate the pivot on the shaft.    
 

 

Thanks, that's quite a timely reply as I was reassembling this on my tractor just last night. So if I understand you correctly, you leave the steering arm and gear to rotate on the shaft? I was considering using locktite to anchor the gear and arm to the shaft as it seemed to me that if they rotated on the shaft, there was no reason to have the bronze bearings in the main mounitng plate assembly, but if I can let it spin on the shaft as-is that saves me some trouble. I had presumed that if the arm/gear weren't secured to the shaft, they could drift slightly to the side allowing the steering pinion to slip.

 

Edit: Apologies for the minor hijack


Edited by dtsh, July 26, 2017 - 10:04 AM.


#57 LRCXed ONLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2017 - 10:53 AM

Thank you Chev. Now I know why my pedal moved when I turned the wheel.

 

The last thing I worked on yesterday was getting the steering wheel off the shaft. I slide a large socket over the shaft so it would rest on the bottom side of the steel center hub and didn't rest on any of the plastic. Then setting it in the vice loosely so it wasn't tight on the shaft, I used another socket that slide over the threads and rested on the solid part of the shaft around it. I was going to set this in the press, but I decided to try hammering it to see if it moved. Two good hits and the shaft was pushed out. The top socket slide through the hole of the steel hub. No damage was done to the threaded end this way.

 

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Well, that's going to be all that gets done for a couple days. I got something in my left eye last night that seems to be embedded in there. So it'll be a trip to the DR,s office today and likely letting it heal for a couple days. It sucks only seeing with one eye.


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#58 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2017 - 02:05 PM

So if I understand you correctly, you leave the steering arm and gear to rotate on the shaft? I was considering using locktite to anchor the gear and arm to the shaft as it seemed to me that if they rotated on the shaft, there was no reason to have the bronze bearings in the main mounitng plate assembly, but if I can let it spin on the shaft as-is that saves me some trouble. I had presumed that if the arm/gear weren't secured to the shaft, they could drift slightly to the side allowing the steering pinion to slip.

 

 

 

Attached is the page from the Tube Frame Service Manual on the steering assembly.  As you can see the steering gear and arm are sandwiched between the steering shaft pinion (E) and the main support once everything is assembled - as long as it is shimmed beside the main support to provide a thrust surface and the steering column adjusted properly so that the gear and pinion mesh without binding then it should work fine and not drift.  The shaft may or may not turn with the gear and arm depending on how much crud is trapped between the shaft and the gear and arm.  It probably was designed to be assembled dry with the intention that the gear arm and shaft should rotate as an assembly but a bit of grease will prevent the gear and arm from becoming married to the shaft so that they can be removed without the use of heat (wasn't that fun) and should the arm and gear rotate on the shaft there should not be much wear with the grease acting as a lubricant - just my opinion.    

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#59 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2017 - 02:22 PM

Thank you Chev. Now I know why my pedal moved when I turned the wheel.

 

The last thing I worked on yesterday was getting the steering wheel off the shaft. I slide a large socket over the shaft so it would rest on the bottom side of the steel center hub and didn't rest on any of the plastic. Then setting it in the vice loosely so it wasn't tight on the shaft, I used another socket that slide over the threads and rested on the solid part of the shaft around it. I was going to set this in the press, but I decided to try hammering it to see if it moved. Two good hits and the shaft was pushed out. The top socket slide through the hole of the steel hub. No damage was done to the threaded end this way.

 

 

Well, that's going to be all that gets done for a couple days. I got something in my left eye last night that seems to be embedded in there. So it'll be a trip to the DR,s office today and likely letting it heal for a couple days. It sucks only seeing with one eye.

 

I like the way you removed the steering shaft - may try that if I have to take another one apart. 

 

Sorry to hear about the problem with your eye - hope it is nothing serious.  As I get older the thoughts of loosing sight, hearing or my mind (maybe I already have) make me think how lucky I have been over the years considering what I have done in the shop and make me doubly vigilant about wearing safety glasses and wearing eye protection.  Since I was about eighteen I have always worn glasses to see things clearly until about ten years ago when I started wearing bifocals (the bottom part of the lense is just clear glass).  Since then I usually take my glasses off and put on safety glasses when I am in the shop as the regular glasses do nothing for me working on things close up.   Years ago I had a lense in my eyeglasses shattered when something slipped and flew up and broke the lense.  I was stubborn and flushed it out with water figuring all would be good.  Kept me awake that night ( Saturday ) and finally the next morning I went to the doctor.  Not much fun getting shattered glass cleaned out of your eye on a Sunday at the emergency room but at least I got to learn from my mistake and still have vison in both eyes. 


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#60 LRCXed ONLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2017 - 03:58 PM

Attached is the page from the Tube Frame Service Manual on the steering assembly.  As you can see the steering gear and arm are sandwiched between the steering shaft pinion (E) and the main support once everything is assembled - as long as it is shimmed beside the main support to provide a thrust surface and the steering column adjusted properly so that the gear and pinion mesh without binding then it should work fine and not drift.  The shaft may or may not turn with the gear and arm depending on how much crud is trapped between the shaft and the gear and arm.  It probably was designed to be assembled dry with the intention that the gear arm and shaft should rotate as an assembly but a bit of grease will prevent the gear and arm from becoming married to the shaft so that they can be removed without the use of heat (wasn't that fun) and should the arm and gear rotate on the shaft there should not be much wear with the grease acting as a lubricant - just my opinion.    

 

Thanks for that file. It'll help a lot when it comes time to reassemble the tractor.

With the gears rusted to the shaft I see now how the ends of that shaft get worn. If the shaft can't float and is turning in the bushings every time you turn, the shaft can ware down with dirt that gets in between it and the bushing. I'm really thinking about drilling the two gears and putting a grease fitting in there to keep them lubed.


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