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Potatoe patch and dealing with the bug


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#46 Sawdust ONLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2017 - 08:33 PM

Neem oil and spinosad! Both are organic and will knock them little pests OUT! Deader than dead and for a few weeks. The neem oil even smells good like orange juice. I use a brand called Captian Jacks dead bug! For potato bugs I love this stuff because it works sooo good! And mixing in some Neem oil makes it stick!and last a touch longer by sheltering the spinosad from the suns uv that cuts back on its effectiveness over time.



What's the ratio between the two. I was looking at some Captain Jacks products the other day for blight...it had good reviews.
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#47 propane1 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2017 - 08:55 PM

Yes Jim. The buckwheat is a cover crop and that's where I will be planting potatoes next year. Hopefully. The buckwheat is about 18" tall now. Once it flowers I will disk it down and plow it under. Then will redisk and replant buckwheat again. Once it flowers, I will plow it under. Hope fully have good rich soil for the potatoes next year. And it controls weeds, plus wire worm.

The potatoes are apart like that so I can get the garden tractors though to do the work, but when the rows are apart like that , the leaves dry of quicker to help reduce blight. I also plant the seeds about 24" to 30" apart in the rows to help dry out the leaves after rain. And if I ever see any blight, the torch fixes those leaves.

Noel

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Edited by propane1, July 12, 2017 - 09:00 PM.

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#48 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2017 - 03:05 AM

What's the ratio between the two. I was looking at some Captain Jacks products the other day for blight...it had good reviews.


I would mix a 15 gallon batch so i used a quart (2 oz. Per gallon basically) of Capt. Jacks and the proper amount of Neem oil for the 15 gallons of liquid. I think it was 8 oz. Anyways it WAS $$ but SOOOO EFFECTIVE! It even worked on cabbage worms too. Rabbits and chucks dont like the smell of the Neem oil too, so they stay away from stuff spayed.
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#49 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2017 - 07:56 AM

In your area, it's potato bugs. Here, it Japanese Beetles!​ :biting_nails: Those suckers are everywhere. They eat leaves destroy flowers; one guy told me they even ruin his Linden trees.     We can put up traps for them, but the traps just attract them from elsewhere.                   


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#50 Sawdust ONLINE  

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Posted July 13, 2017 - 09:39 AM

In your area, it's potato bugs. Here, it Japanese Beetles!:biting_nails: Those suckers are everywhere. They eat leaves destroy flowers; one guy told me they even ruin his Linden trees. We can put up traps for them, but the traps just attract them from elsewhere.


I always thought the same when people put bug traps out, that just attracts more

#51 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 14, 2017 - 07:33 AM

Neem oil works great for those little pukes too but my favorite for them on roses and flowers is a systemic from Bayer its a plant food and pesticide! They take a bite and die shortly after....
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#52 propane1 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 18, 2017 - 07:38 PM

So, killed more today. But they are not as many now. Only six adults out of all the patchs. Some babies. 7 potatoe patches in all. Some very small, one big one, only going out to do it every second day now. Still on the same tank of fuel , which was not full when I started, because of using it in the garage for heating stuff up.

Noel
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#53 Mustard Tiger OFFLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2017 - 08:43 PM

I've had fairly good results using Dipel Pro DF. It's a modified bacteria commonly called BT (Bacillus thuringeinsis) which is sprayed on the plants and when eaten by insects, causes them to stop eating within hours and die in a few days. It's safe for non-insects to ingest and is non-toxic.

The only Dipel products valent lists are BTK which is for caterpillars, not Colorado potato beetle.  BT is very specific, you need the right strain for the right bug.  BTT is for potato beetles, but we have to import it up here, nobody in Canada sells it.  I would strongly recommend people use that instead of all the broad insecticides others are recommending.  Wiping out bees, earthworms, frogs, birds, fish, spiders and other predatory insects just to control one specific type of bug is pretty terrible.


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#54 Mustard Tiger OFFLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2017 - 08:50 PM

Those are not Lady Bugs, they are Asian Beetles.  Lady Bugs do not have an odor and are good for your house plants as well as outdoor plants.

Ladybugs are an entire family, which includes both species in question.  Asian ladybugs are also good for your plants, they eat aphids and other pests just like north american ladybugs do.  They just stink and like to invade houses in the fall, that's all.


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