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#1 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 07:01 AM

In another thread I described getting a brinly plow for the bolens.

http://gardentractor...d-use/?p=771677

 

With the plow on I went to the field next door (technically a "building lot") and started plowing.  Around 10x20 by the time i got done...

gardenpatch.jpg

It was unbroken sod, in a semi-low spot, damp after spring rains but not a mud bog.  The plot is flat, but in the middle of a slope.  So the tractor wasn't always at the same angle. 

 

The first pass I had it set too deep and kept hanging up.  I raised up the plow some with the crank, it got a little better but wasn't rolling over too good.  The pic above shows a couple small piles i had to pull by hand so the tractor wouldn't bounce on the next pass.

 

After 2 passes i drove back to the shop, got out the manual and tools, and readjusted things so it would roll over better.  Changed the hitch pin hole and cable length.

 

Back in the garden I was able to keep up a fairly decent speed, tho i had to keep adjusting the depth, maybe for being on a slope??  I still bounced around some, maybe because of the fat tires on back??  ...also the tires don't line up exact on the inside front to rear...

sleeveplow.jpg

 

Mostly I think i got the depth right but can't get consistent, clean furrows, sometimes the sod fell back under the tires then i'd bounce around.

garden2.jpg

 

view from the side

garden3.jpg

 

View from the other end. 

garden.jpg

On the ends you can see where I tried to scrape up the sod with a front dozer blade, but all it did was pack things down and bounce me around.

 

How do you get fresh sod out of a new garden patch?  Tiller?  York rake?  For now it looks like we'll be pulling it by hand...

 

thanks for any help or advice

 


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#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 07:32 AM

Could be a # of issues. Did you put the LH tires up on blocks about 5" high to set the plow? Can the plow swing Left to Right some? Too slow ground speed can cause the sod to fall back in also. Did you read this thread?


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#3 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 08:44 AM

Hi Kenny i read olcowhand's thread and article, also a bunch of other threads to get started, one of yours i think too, thanks. 

 

I didn't use the blocks mostly because my garden plot is on a slope and the wheels would never really be on the same angle, even the first pass to the second pass the high side of tractor went from uphill to the downhill side.

 

Instead I went by the brinly manual, with a 1" initial setting then says to readjust once you get a row cut and the wheels sink in.  Maybe my first pass would have gone better with the blocks as it was way too deep, but i just kept loosening the handle and think i got the depth right, about 5" deep with a 10" plow...?...

 

I tried to keep the speed up, mostly it worked except when i'd lose traction or bounce on some sod that fell back in the row.  In which case i could back up then hit it again, always got enough traction to get to the end of the row...

 

yes i let the plow swing free... thanks for the tips!  keep em coming, also how to get the sod out of the rows, any way to do it with the tractor and not by hand??


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#4 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 09:01 AM

Unbroken ground is always hard to work the first time. Sounds like you did all you could to make it work.

Got a tiller? That would turn it in. Or even a blade would pull it out, but you still have to deal with the chunks.


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#5 SimplyRad OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 09:06 AM

If you have a tiller or a disc just go over the plowed area a few times. Best bet would have been to use round up a couple weeks before you plowed.


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#6 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 11:09 AM

When we broke a bit of pasture to make another garden the plow went first, then a disc many times. It makes a difference which direction you go with the disc, do the whole plot one way first, then reverse direction and do it over again and keep repeating until you're satisfied it's well chewed up. Then harrow the heck out of it to pull the tufts of grass to the surface and shake the dirt out of them. A spring tooth harrow works best but a tine tooth or flexible harrow section are fine as well. (I pulled a section of flexible harrows behind the JD STX 38 and had it ready to seed in a couple of hours) By then the whole thing should be dried out enough for the wind to blow what  grass is left  off and you can plant when ever you want.


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#7 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 01:18 PM

If you have a tiller or a disc just go over the plowed area a few times. Best bet would have been to use round up a couple weeks before you plowed.

Definitely round-up first at least 2 weeks ahead of the plowing.  That kills everything down through the roots.  Then mow it as short as you can to really grind up the dead grass.  THEN your ready for the plow and disc.  They way you did it you will be fighting sod till next spring.

 

You said you didn't use the blocks under the tractor wheels to set the plow up.  I was having the same problems you are.  Then I set the plow up using blocks under the left hand tires and problems went away.  Slope of the ground has no bearing on how the plow is set up.  Put your tractors left side up on 5" blocks like several others have said.  Then adjust your hook up to the tractor so the plow is running vertical and the land slide is near level on the ground.  Then when your plowing keep the tractor tires off the edge of the furrow and I think you will have better luck plowing.

 

At the point your at now, I would get a compact tractor with tiller and grind the heck out of the ground. Good luck with your new garden.


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#8 daniel_b OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 04:26 PM

 
Actually, I don't think what you have shown us in the pictures of what you have done is all that bad, pretty decent looking!, especially if you haven't done any plowin' before!!  What is that ol' sayin' about 'our worst critic is ourselves' -  :D
 
Sure, probably like everyone else, when I was 13 - 17 or so, I KNEW IT ALL!, AND KNEW THAT I DID!!  But then again, like everyone else, as I got a bit older, begin to find out just how much I didn't know, (maybe forgot some things? :wallbanging: ).
 
There are some good threads here on the forums that I thought had very pertinent info that would be very useful.
You mentioned you had already read through these  threads:
Proper way of setting up a one bottom plow 
the tech article HERE:
 
and this one
Turning Plow 101
a very succinctly well-written article, nothing extra, just what one needs who hasn't done it before, or used a gt to do it...
the only problem i had with the treads was, they "hid" them in the implements forum, and Kenny's "ISN'T EVEN A STICKEY"  :mad2:
 
 
JMHO, I would say the threads in this forum, 'Gardening' - seem to be more about AFTER the garden is in,
 
and the threads in this forum, 'Tilling & Plowing' - are more about the basics of the "how-to-get-there" to put the garden  in...
 
Many good threads here, I've quoted some parts I thought were very pertinent to plowing, (and think those who made them deserve the credit for doing so),
 
post 6,
...These plows were made to work with a wide variety of different brands of tractors and different brands are different widths across the back tires. The plow has to line up correctly with the right rear tire or it wont work properly...
post 11,
...The inside of your front tire should line up with the inside of the rear tire.  That way, as you plow the inside of both tires sits snugly against the furrow wall.
The first year I plowed the rear tires were turned "inward" so the outside edges of the tires matched.  I kept trying to put the front tire snug against the furrow, ended up fighting the tractor since the rear tires were snug against the furrow before the front could get there...
 
 
post 4, the pics
post 9,
...If the dirt from the furrow is falling back into the furrow after the plow passes there are a few things you could try.  Speed would one, you should be moving at a brisk walking pace, about 4 mph.  If the ground was on a slope, when you tried to throw uphill it would more easily roll back down, can't help you with that one.  I think maybe plowing less deep, or adjusting the plow for a narrower slice might also help to roll the dirt on over...
post 11,
...Yes, rust will hurt the way a plow performs. You need to wire wheel and even polish it with a sanding disk. The dirt will slide off a slick plow much better then a rusty one...
post 15, the pic and
...Here is a picture of plough showing what is called  suck
If you do not have this because the point is worn you will end up having the plough dancing on its toes trying to get it do dig in
it will not work
post 12,
...I was struggling figuring out how to use the 10 inch Brinly. I then found the link to the Manual for it.
It was eye opening I was doing it ALL wrong. Once I set it up per the book It works Much better...
 
 
QUOTE:
...On the ends you can see where I tried to scrape up the sod with a front dozer blade, but all it did was pack things down and bounce me around.
How do you get fresh sod out of a new garden patch?  Tiller?  York rake?  For now it looks like we'll be pulling it by hand...
thanks for any help or advice...
 
post 4,
...Bonus was some nice fat tires for mowing grass,..
post 20,
...We just had the driveway redone so I went with the rubber chains...
post 33, 
the plow pics
Clipboard01-plow.gif
Clipboard02-polw.gif
 
MHO, I think there is a time and place for all kinds of equipment and we all seem to find what works best for each of us.
Personally, I don't care for tires being to "fat" - on level ground, welllll, okay, but on very much of a slope, you have to use to much weight to keep them from sliding - and especially if there's any "dampness" involved, (not much difference in slickness between snow and ice or wet grass or leaves). THEN, there's the compaction, so then you HAVE to aerate... bloody, vicious circle, especially if you're as lazy as I seem to be getting...
 
Next I'm going to pick on your "chains" - yes, if you're concerned about "marking" asphalt or concrete, the type you have are good, BUT, I'm not concerned, so I made my own 2-link chains out of some old tire chains from when I had bigger trucks, kind of a cross between so-called "V-Bar" chains and whatever. They sure don't do much slippin' or slidin' 
 
My Grand-dad had a thing about a plow share, 'grease don't rust' - so when we were done the plowin' - into the wagon shed and smear all parts of it good. Yes, if you live where there is a good bit of sand in the soil, polishes fairly quick, but if the pics you posted in post 33, (other thread), are AFTER you plowed your garden, a plow WILL buck and jump a whole bunch 'til it can SLIDE through the soil, even if you do have a team of Percherons pulling it!
 
as I said waayyy up there, don't be to hard on yourself, you did a good job, :thumbs:   :rocker2:
even a person having done a LOT of plowing sometimes has problems...
 
Well, I guess I better close this "book" - hope some of the above helped...
 

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#9 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 06:26 PM

I think you did a great job. Now to find a plow day nearby and go to it! You will learn more there!


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#10 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 11:51 AM

JMHO, I would say the threads in this forum, 'Gardening' - seem to be more about AFTER the garden is in,
and the threads in this forum, 'Tilling & Plowing' - are more about the basics of the "how-to-get-there" to put the garden  in...

You could be right, i probably should have scrolled down some more to the Plowing section... tho it's not a very big garden plot by intention so i figured i'd get the dirt work done pretty quick, then on to the Gardening part... but i have been wrong before

 

I hear you on the rubber chains, too fat tires, etc.  This is all part of my tractor experiment/evolution the older i get, just to own & maintain one machine, and i don't have the storage space, in fact i just bought a clamshell trailer to get my GT out of the rain for the first time in almost 10 years...  our yard is almost always wet and it is rough clumps so the fat tires help smooth out the ride and traction for most of what i do..

 

Anyway i like the bolens, the implements chang out pretty quick and for my 16H they aren't too heavy, which my back is shot so it is all working for me, so far...even the rubber chains, i can keep on all year which helps my back... doesn't slip on the wet hills... plus i get to be a kind of "rubber tire chain guinea pig" in the garden and plowing snow/ice in winter...  i know everyone is different and i appreciate other people's point of view... thank you for the tips!


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#11 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 11:53 AM

When we broke a bit of pasture to make another garden the plow went first, then a disc many times. It makes a difference which direction you go with the disc, do the whole plot one way first, then reverse direction and do it over again and keep repeating until you're satisfied it's well chewed up. Then harrow the heck out of it to pull the tufts of grass to the surface and shake the dirt out of them. A spring tooth harrow works best but a tine tooth or flexible harrow section are fine as well. (I pulled a section of flexible harrows behind the JD STX 38 and had it ready to seed in a couple of hours) By then the whole thing should be dried out enough for the wind to blow what  grass is left  off and you can plant when ever you want.

Thanks oldedeeres that is exactly the kind of tools i am thinking of... i am in the experimental phase so it is good to see someone else has made it work with a plow and harrow combination..


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#12 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 12:00 PM

If you have a tiller or a disc just go over the plowed area a few times. Best bet would have been to use round up a couple weeks before you plowed.

Thanks at present i am unable to use a tiller but am thinking about a disc!

 

Definitely round-up first at least 2 weeks ahead of the plowing.   Then mow it as short as you can to really grind up the dead grass.

 

You said you didn't use the blocks under the tractor wheels to set the plow up.  I was having the same problems you are.  Then I set the plow up using blocks under the left hand tires and problems went away.  I think you will have better luck plowing.  Good luck with your new garden.

Thanks, I did mow the grass right before plowing.  At this point we are trying to do it chem-free... As for the blocks i may revisit that but i think after flailing around at first i figured out how to set the crank for where i was in the pass... unfortunately i can only study so much before my head spins so finally i just have to get out there and learn by doing...  i do appreciate all the help on this site!


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#13 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 12:09 PM

Here is the main reason i went out there the other day and "got er done"... there was 2" of rain in the forecast...  it didn't lie...

wetgarden.jpg

if i waited i think it would have been a mud bog trying to plow up virgin sod.  it is getting close to planting time here so felt i had to get in there and rip it up before the rain.

i have an idea on how to get it drained and the sod pulled, don't want to jinx myself but with luck could get out there once the rain lets up. oddly enough the only place it pooled up was where i went across the rows trying to pull out the sod ahead of the weather...


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#14 SimplyRad OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2017 - 11:52 AM

If it is on a slope just get it leveled and it will drain.


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#15 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2017 - 10:52 AM

If there is somewhere close by that is lower than the end of the garden you could run a trench to it and drain the low end of the garden. Easy to block off and hold water if it gets too dry later on as well and you decide to try and hold some moisture in.
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