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Page garden tractor


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#1 tom tractor OFFLINE  

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Posted May 21, 2017 - 05:55 AM

I just acquired this Page garden tractor. The engine is seized and needs new tires. I have never seen one like it before. Has anyone else?

This link is about all I know about it...
http://www.simplicit...rearengine.html

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Edited by tom tractor, May 21, 2017 - 06:01 AM.

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#2 holdenboy1960 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 21, 2017 - 06:01 AM

No sir i have not but its a good golden oldie 


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#3 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted May 21, 2017 - 09:54 AM

Very nice. I want one. Don


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#4 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 21, 2017 - 10:41 AM

Looks like a fun project. There's not too much info out there regarding Page tractors, but you can find some info by searching online. Member oldiron1 is heavily into these tractors. Pop the cover off of the magneto and see if the coil insulation has melted into the rotor. This will lock the engine up tight as a drum. Remove the head, too. Tap on the head bolts before removing them, though, since it makes them easier to remove. The head bolts closest to the exhaust may be hard to remove, so you may have to heat them where they thread into the block.
The main issues that could make this a tough project are rust and water in the drivetrain. Parts that are broken, worn, or badly rust damaged will be hard to find. I just disassembled a 1960 Page tractor, and luckily nothing that's hard to find is destroyed. Good luck and a great find!
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#5 tom tractor OFFLINE  

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Posted May 22, 2017 - 05:25 AM

Thanks Classic! I will try your suggestions. The motor that is in the tractor now is a AENLD. Would the AKN motor fit? Did most of The Wisconsin motors have the same mounting bolt pattern?

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Edited by tom tractor, May 22, 2017 - 05:27 AM.

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#6 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 22, 2017 - 07:24 PM

You're welcome, Tom. I'm not sure regarding the Wisconsin engine interchangeability. I have an AENL and some AKN engines and I can check. I'm pretty sure that they are the same, though. Since I have my Page flywheel housing (hogs head) unbolted from my engine, I can check to be positive.

#7 tom tractor OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2017 - 05:32 AM

Thanks classic! I can't find anything online with poly pattern spacing. Any help would be great

#8 oldiron1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 03:03 PM

Hi Tom, Neat find!

 

What you have is a Page model ZA12 Master.

 

Page's first rear engine, riding tractor was based on the Walk Behind tractors that they sold for years prior, the first model manufactured beginning a model ZA10 in 1946 used the Walk behind tractor drive train as the rear end, that they just simply added a forward/reverse selector to. It still utilized the walk behind tractor's individual wheel clutches which surely makes it interesting to get used to driving, but it will steer really short being able to utilize the individual clutches with the steering wheel. That first model was considered the "standard" model and was powered by a number of different 4-5hp engines, but most commonly, the Wisconsin ABN. This model didn't have any brakes. 

 

The transmission is unique and specific to these riders, however the rest of the drive train is the same as a walk behind tractor which you can find easier to use for parts if necessary. 

 

In 1950, Page introduced the "Master", which was a slightly beefed up standard model. The front casting was redesigned to be heavier, it had individual wheel brakes and the biggest improvement in my opinion was a hand operated clutch and differential. It was powered by a slightly larger Wisconsin AKN engine. Page produced both standard models at the same time for a couple years and the Master was produced through 1957 until replaced by Page's new lineup of front engine riding tractors. 

 

Your tractor has been re-powered by the AENLD. The only thing I've seen that's been consistent on the Master models, is the use of the AKN engine. To confirm, the AENLD on your tractor dates to 1967. Based on the pictures of your tractor and it's configuration, I'd estimate yours to have been manufactured somewhere between 1951-1956. I also see that your brake pedals are missing which could be remade to be functional and look close. It looks like someone added some stuff, but can't make out what was added by the pictures. The biggest thing missing is the equipment lift. Otherwise, it looks like your tractor has "good bones". I like the steering wheel yours has which I believe to be original. 

 

They are scarce, both the tractors themselves as well as parts and any related information. I've managed to collect (4) Page rear engine riders so far; 2 Standard's and 2 Masters.

 

I'm happy to help you out anyway I can.

 

Thanks, Rob

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Edited by oldiron1, May 25, 2017 - 03:07 PM.

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#9 tom tractor OFFLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2017 - 09:04 AM

Hello Rob,

Thank you very much for the information. I just got a ACN motor which I will need to machine to accept the transmission's bell housing.

Someone rigged up a hydrolic pump and piston for a plow.

I'm sure I will have other questions about the page.

How many of these ride-on Page's were built?
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#10 oldiron1 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 06, 2017 - 04:24 PM

Ah, I saw something rigged up but couldn't make out just what it was. 

The ACN should be a good replacement engine that most people probably will never recognize as not original. 

 

Good question on the production numbers. There isn't any of that kind of information documented besides what I've started to document to my knowledge. Everything is relative...however it's fair to state that "not many" is reasonable. 

 

I'm excited to see your progress! 

 

Rob



#11 oldiron1 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2017 - 10:35 PM

After adding another Page tractor to my registry tonight, reviewing the serial numbers and mfg dates that I have recorded and doing a little math, from 1949-1952 anyway, it seems that Page produced approx 1,000 - 1,300 tractors per year which equates to roughly 85-109 tractors per month. I have a few serial numbers recorded after that but there are some pretty big gaps. It seems like that's pretty consistent though, but the more Page tractors with serial tags that pop up that can be added, the better we'll be able to validate that guesstimate. 

 

Now keep in mind, Page ran all of their serial numbers in sequence, so this production total includes walk behind tractors, which I tend to believe Page produced way more of than riding tractors. 

 

Anyway, just wanted to share this and hope to fine tune these figures as time goes on. 

 

Thanks, Rob






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