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Working on the rusty 1960 Page tractor


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#1 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2017 - 08:37 PM

I was working on a '76 Power King today, total rebuild, but had to see what condition the Briggs was in on the Page. I picked it up at an auction Saturday, and it's a bit rough around the edges, underneath, on top, front and back, etc. We'll the cast engine pulley is threaded left hand and so is the nut holding the pulley on. It didn't take long to figure that out, heh! The engine flywheel nut is just plain right hand thread like other Briggs 23's. The flywheel came off without much trouble and the crankshaft is clean. The clutch flywheel came off fairly easily and the crankshaft is clean with no rust on that end, too. Good thing for leaky engine oil seals! The crankcase is pretty clean and there is no play in the connecting rod. The cam gear, crank gear, cam lobes, and governor have very little wear on them. It will be an easy rebuild with a .010 bore and valve job. I was actually pretty surprised.

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#2 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2017 - 09:00 PM

And you couldda had a Gravely.   :rolling:

 

That Page is awesome!  :beer:


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#3 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 17, 2017 - 09:03 PM

The Gravely looked to be in great shape and probably ran. I stay away from tractors like that, HA!
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#4 tiretrx ONLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2017 - 07:54 AM

That's some cool iron :thumbs:


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#5 637Yeoman OFFLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2017 - 02:27 PM

That motor looks tiny! Thanks for saving another one Classic


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#6 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 18, 2017 - 04:11 PM

You're welcome Luke, and there really isn't much to these engines once you strip them down to the long block. The bull gear back plate and housing have grooves worn in them on the right side. The axle bushings wore and the sides of the bull gear caused the grooves. I'll fill them in with weld and grind smooth. It will take some doing to get the bull gear housings back in shape. It's simple, just time consuming.
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#7 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2017 - 01:54 PM

The right rear wheel was leaning in on the Page, so I knew that there was an issue with the axle and bushings on that side. I could see a bulge in an arc on the outside of the sheet metal bull gear cover, so I knew that the bull gear ate a groove into the cover and was pushing out on it. Luckily the bull gears and pinion gears are in good shape along with the bull gear and pinion axles. The long bronze outer axle bushings are not worn and it appears that someone reamed them out and rebushed them in the past. The inner axle bushing is a bit worn on one side, but badly worn on the side where the wheel was leaning. They are a common flanged bushing, 1"id x 1-3/8"od x 1-1/2" long. I was able to find them with a little searching and ordered a couple at 7 bucks each.
The bull gear rubbed on the cover for so long, that it wore right through the cover. This allowed the cover to flex out at the bottom, making the wheel lean in at the top. I can square the axle up with the cover and fill in the groove on the cover with weld, making it strong again. With that repaired and new inner axle bushings, the wheel will sit straight again. Here's a pic of the worn bushing sitting on the shaft where the shaft turns in it. There's quite a gap between the bushing and shaft. I then slid the decent bushing from the other side onto the shaft and the gap is very little as you can see in the second pic. In the third pic, you can see the deep groove worn in the cover. It's not that hard of a repair, but it will take a little time.

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#8 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2017 - 02:07 PM

Here you can see the bulge at the bottom of the housing. Also, you can see that the outer bronze axle bushing has been sleeved and soldered in place.

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#9 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2017 - 02:20 PM

Here are the brakes. A cam mounted to the back plate fits into the opening in the iron band. The cam rotates when you push on the brake pedal and forces the band against the bull gear. I'm glad none of this is broken or worn, whew!

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#10 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2017 - 03:44 PM

Thank for showing and explaining the Page I'm thinking most won't ever see the inner workings in person
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#11 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 20, 2017 - 05:51 PM

You're welcome, Alc. It's hard to find any detailed info on these Page tractors, so I might as well post pics as I work on it. There are differences in these Page final drives. This one has bushings, and another from '64 that I took apart has bearings. The oddballs always turn out to be interesting to work on.

Edited by classic, May 22, 2017 - 12:58 PM.

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#12 oldiron1 ONLINE  

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Posted May 22, 2017 - 11:46 AM

Thanks Classic, for posting these pictures and info! In my opinion, the axle/brass bushing construction is one of the weakest links to any of the Page/Red E tractors of this era. I have yet to find one that the rear wheels aren't leaning; and it's always the right side that's most worn from my observations so far. 


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#13 jhn9840 ONLINE  

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Posted May 22, 2017 - 12:41 PM

Cool old tractor. I could see where it would have ended up in a scrap pile somewhere if the wrong person found it.

jhn9840
John


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#14 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 22, 2017 - 05:26 PM

You're welcome oldiron1. I searched a while back and couldn't find any info or pics of the final drives. This was when I was working on the '64 Red-E Page. The '64 has a slightly different set up than this '60 Page. It's good to post pics of the uncommon machines so that others know what to look for. As far as bushings go, they are ok unless used beyond wear limits. Most people run them until something else wears badly or breaks. Roller bearings are a far better choice, but cost more.
These rusty old machines are a blast to bring back, John. I heard scrapyard comments about this tractors and others that looked just as bad at the auction. Most people just aren't interested in doing the work it takes to bring them back, though. It's understandable since it can be a pain at times. I knew that I had engine and transmission parts before bidding, and I just took a chance that the rest was salvageable/rebuildable. It will take some time to rebuild the drop boxes, but it won't be difficult. I sorted through some parts and found most of what I need to rebuild the engine. I did have to order a new intake valve and that should be it. I stripped some good parts off of a portable water pump that was once used by a fire dept. The Briggs 23DFB actually ran great, but I picked it up for a time like this when I need parts. I have no need for the pump anyway. I had some spare ignition parts, so I'm all set with that.

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Edited by classic, May 22, 2017 - 05:28 PM.

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#15 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2017 - 05:20 PM

I just checked the serial numbers on the 23AFB Briggs in the Page and on the replacement Briggs 23AFB that I just rebuilt for a 1960 Economy tractor. The serial numbers are real close, only 40 apart. The page is 690844 and the engine that I just rebuilt is 690804. The engine type numbers are different due to the fact that the Page crankshaft has left hand threads on the front of the crankshaft for the rope start pulley. I decided to put the crankshaft from the Page in this rebuilt engine and install this engine on the Page tractor. I'll put the tag from the page tractor on this engine, too. I've gone a different direction with the 1960 Economy tractor and I won't be restoring that one. I found a pair of 7-24 rims tires and tubes for 80 bucks, so I'll be building a 1958 Economy tractor with 24" rears. I've already picked up 5 lug rear hubs with axles and the tall front spindles for the project. I have a '56 PK frame and a bellhousing with an Economy tag with the serial number dating it to 1958. I can rebuild another Briggs for this project when the time comes.

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