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#1 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted June 15, 2011 - 09:58 PM

Well a couple weeks ago i damed up a small branch in the back yard up hill from the garden. I started with 1 sewer pipe then 3 2 inch pvc, then 1 inch pvc then 1/2 inch pvc, Am getting good flow. But want to try to put pressure on. Thinking about getting 50-60 ft sewer pipe then take it to 2 inch then down to 1 inch. Now the question is will the larger pipe help booast the pressure up some to run it up hill just a little where it will couer the whole garden??????? Thanks for all the good answers i know i will get.

#2 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 05:36 AM

Well a couple weeks ago i damed up a small branch in the back yard up hill from the garden. I started with 1 sewer pipe then 3 2 inch pvc, then 1 inch pvc then 1/2 inch pvc, Am getting good flow. But want to try to put pressure on. Thinking about getting 50-60 ft sewer pipe then take it to 2 inch then down to 1 inch. Now the question is will the larger pipe help booast the pressure up some to run it up hill just a little where it will couer the whole garden??????? Thanks for all the good answers i know i will get.


Dale I always thought that the smaller the pipe the more pressure you can get? Are you flowing the water downhill and trying to get pressure? If that is the case then running the large pipe as far as you can and then dropping to size would be about the best that you are going to get. Might have to put a pump on it to get the pressure you might be looking for.

#3 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 05:37 AM

Dale ,I've been trying to put together some type of gravity feed water system for my garden too. If you do a goggle search of
" gravity irrigation system " you should be able to find something close to what your trying to do . I'm looking into a gravity drip irrigation for my garden , I don't have much water to waste and want something that I don't need to stand there with a hose or watering can like I do now, Al

#4 KIRO-1 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 06:02 AM

Getting water to run up hill will be difficult to do without some form of pump. It will flow up as long as the highest point at the beginning of the run remains the highest point or if you can maintain a vacuum in the line. (kind of like siphoning) The larger line at the start of the run should increase the pressure at the end of the run. The pressure at the end of the run will be 1/2 of the temp. of the water as long as the lines remain totally full.
Years ago I had an irrigation system for my Apple trees with a similar situation. I did have a 3hp gas engine pump to assist when the water level got low.

#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 06:24 AM

I have been thinking about setting up a tank to catch rain water for the garden. Something I can hook a garden hose to for gravity feed. The tank would be the expensive part for me.

#6 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 07:29 AM

Dale , this is what I'm planning to use , maybe if you can get one you can fill it up with pump and gravity feed as you use it , AlPosted Image

#7 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 08:57 AM

The pressure for Water is 0.43 PSI per foot of height.
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#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 10:19 AM

Hi Kenny

We use a few 55gallon plastic drums to collect water from downspouts. The ones we use come from a bakery and have had baking soda or vinegar in them. They are cheap at about 15$ each. Works for us.
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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 11:29 AM

This is an interesting topic. Everyone is contributing a part of the solution. Ducky offered the key to making this work" The pressure for Water is 0.43 PSI per foot of height. Every municipal water system, my Rural system and even all the locks & dams on the Mississippi run on gravity feed.
And the key to water pressure is the height of the tower(they may pump to fill the tower but gravity feed from there). My home must be equal or close to the height of the suppying tower becase I have low pressure from the rural Water company.
In my last home, I was on the bottom of a large hill and the tower was on top so had good pressure, but low volume. The previous owner had hooked to the feed with 1/2" pipe and when I changed to 3/4" volume impoved greatly.
It's all a compromise but you may need to pump to a tower to get what your looking for?

Or is the elevation such that you could gravity feed to an improvised tower to increase the pressure along the route to your garden?

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 16, 2011 - 11:46 AM.


#10 tex tractor jack OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 05:35 PM

The thing about going smaller on the pipe size is that it increases the friction in the pipe, so there is a trade off. Getting the pickup point to a higher location is the main trick to increasing the pressure

#11 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 06:50 PM

Dale, The bigger the pipe and the farther you run it, the better the pressure will be. You need to find you a windmill water pump to fill your tower, let Mother Nature do the work for you.
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#12 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 09:57 PM

I'm getting good flow now, I did put in some more 2 inch and increased it some now i can get two more rows. What I'm doing is running water without a pump about 300 ft. from 1 side of yard to the other it is down hill but then i take it back up the hill for the garden. Will have to check to see how many gallons per hour. Also if i can stop all leaks it will do better. Thanks for all the help. Will add more as time goes along. Also ate the first ripe mater today. Along with cukes.

#13 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 10:05 PM

Try looking at this, Dale... Hydraulic ram pump YouTube - ‪Hydraulic Ram Pump‬‏

#14 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2011 - 10:16 PM

Here's another kind. Lift is limited according to the size of the wheel. YouTube - ‪WATERWHEEL PUMP‬‏
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