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Going to plow for the first time this weekend


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#1 Dan O OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 10:48 AM

I have a Bolens H14 (tube frame) tractor and I am going to get some seat time and to use my Brinley mouldboard plow for the first time this weekend. I'm a city dweller who got the tractor for the snowblower and blade for clearing snow, and it came with a Brinley plow.

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Didn't think there would be much of a chance to use it, but I did think, cool, mouldboard plow, that makes it a "real" tractor.  I know a guy who runs a community gardening program and offered to use my plow if he ever needed it, and the other day he let me know that they have a approximately 200' x 100' area that he need plowed, and I said heck yeah, I'd do it. The lot has been a garden for a while, so its not exactly fresh earth.

 

When I got the tractor the coulter wheel was seized up, so last summer I took it apart, cleaned it up, lubed, painted and put it back together. I've been reading some of the posts, and I'm going to use the the wire wheel on the angle grinder to clean the rust off the plow tomorrow, since several people recommended a smooth plow makes for easier plowing.

 

I've read the Brinley manual, olcowhand's "Proper way of setting up a one bottom plow" which only sort of applies because I've got a sleeve hitch, not a three point.

 

I've got a question about the hitch bracket (yoke), it has two different attachment points, one straight and one at an angle. None of the manuals mention this type of bracket.

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I was thinking that the straight attachment point was meant for the initial furrow, and then unbolt it and switch to the slanted one for subsequent furrows. That seems like a kind of a pain, running a furrow and then unbolting the plow in the field, while standing in the mud. Should I set it at the angle and run it that way, or set it strait and run it that way, or is switching it in the field worth the effort?

 

Any help or tips would be appreciated.

 

Hopefully it won't be to wet on Saturday afternoon, weatherman it's supposed to rain on Friday night.

 

 


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#2 MiCarl ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 12:08 PM

Never seen the straight one before.  I wonder if someone added it or maybe it's special for a tractor that has some sort of adjustable sleeve hitch.

 

I just had a similar decision to make when plowing a garden for my wife.  1st time I've used my Brinly 3-point plow.  It's possible to install the pins in such a way that the plow doesn't lean relative to the tractor.  I thought about trying that to open first furrow but decided against it.

 

It occurred to me that at the angle the dirt from the first furrow would be rolled on top of the ground.  With the plow running vertical it'd be trying to push it through the furrow wall and that might not work so well.


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#3 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 12:10 PM

 No expert hear but I believe I would use the straight vertical attachment point. I also believe if you are trying to plow and it requires standing in the mud at all you are looking for trouble, mud is what you make bricks from. Don


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#4 Newpaws493 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 02:36 PM

Hopefully guys with more experience will chime in on this soon. We City dwellers need to know these things too! :anyone:

Seems GT's came to us for similar reasons, there's lots to learn and not quite enough open areas close to home to work these machines like their made for. Probably haven't said it, but Welcome Aboard! Bolens for us too :thumbs:


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#5 propane1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 03:30 PM

Practice is the key, I've been plowing for 8 years or so. Every time I plow I learn a little bit. And I don't have all the answers, it seems ya just get somethin figured out, then some thing else comes along and changes things. Types of different ground play a big part in plowing.
I've never seen a plow with the two hook ups. I would hook to the slanted one, if it's already a garden, but if it was sod, I would use the straight one first, then switch to the slanted one when you go into the furrow.
Any way, practice is the thing to do and change the settings on the plow to see differences. And don't go to deep. If you have a 10" plow, go down about 3"to 4" to start. It will be easier plowing and you won't get frustrated because it won't plow. As you get use to it , then go deeper. 10" plow normally plows at 5" to 6" deep.
Just my opinion, I'm sure others have different opinions.
Main thing is to have fun.

Noel
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#6 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 03:58 PM

I am far from an expert on plowing, but I have plowed with a sleeve hitch plow on a Bolens tube frame. You will want to switch it to the angled tang. (I have never seen a plow with a straight tang on the hitch). You will also want to flip the hitch upside down to where it is now. These plows were made to work with a wide variety of different brands of tractors and different brands are different widths across the back tires. The plow has to line up correctly with the right rear tire or it wont work properly. That is the reason the hitch has 3 holes and if you notice, the angled tang is not centered in the hitch. Flipping it over changes how far the plow is set to the left or right. As I mentioned, you will want to flip it over from where it is now and use the center hole for a Bolens tube frame. Old cowhands instructions on putting the left side of the tractor on blocks and how to adjust the point up or down still apply. As Second Try mentioned, you do not want to try plowing if the ground is too wet, it will compact the soil and that is not a good thing.

 

Jim


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#7 twostacks OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 04:01 PM

Interesting. Both of my Brinly plows only have one mounting point and it's slanted. Your thinking of the purpose of the straight and slanted mounts makes sense, but I wouldn't mess with unbolting and bolting it back together in the field. Put it on the slanted mount and go plowing. The initial furrow that you open just won't be as deep as the second and third time around. The mount is slanted so that when your right side tires are in the furrow the plow stands vertical. I believe that the plows work best when you're plowing half as deep as your plow is wide or there abouts.


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#8 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 04:32 PM

I have been thinking and I am wondering if someone added the straight tang to use the plow to dig potatoes or some similar purpose? I also have a spare plow hitch, so I took a couple of pictures to show how flipping it changes the offset.

 

Jim

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#9 dropped82 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 04:43 PM

I had a plow with the extra piece also. It looked added so I cut it off and ground it smooth. I've been plowing a few years also and have never seen a need for it. I agree with flipping the yoke. Until you start getting a feel for it, the less the bite you take the better. Once you get it adjusted good then you can start taking more ie: widen the gap from the share point to the inside rear tire. Good luck and enjoy!!!

Eric

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#10 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 04:54 PM

I am far from an expert on plowing, but I have plowed with a sleeve hitch plow on a Bolens tube frame. You will want to switch it to the angled tang. (I have never seen a plow with a straight tang on the hitch). You will also want to flip the hitch upside down to where it is now. These plows were made to work with a wide variety of different brands of tractors and different brands are different widths across the back tires. The plow has to line up correctly with the right rear tire or it wont work properly. That is the reason the hitch has 3 holes and if you notice, the angled tang is not centered in the hitch. Flipping it over changes how far the plow is set to the left or right. As I mentioned, you will want to flip it over from where it is now and use the center hole for a Bolens tube frame. Old cowhands instructions on putting the left side of the tractor on blocks and how to adjust the point up or down still apply. As Second Try mentioned, you do not want to try plowing if the ground is too wet, it will compact the soil and that is not a good thing.

 

Jim

I totally agree. Though I normally use a 3-point plow, getting the initial settings on blocks works for both hitches. And I agree on using the slanted side flipped over. The outside point of the plow should be close to even with the inside of the RH tire. And with the LH side on blocks, the plow should sit flat on the ground.


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#11 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 05:29 PM

My two cents would be to see if your tires track straight front and back.  The inside of your front tire should line up with the inside of the rear tire.   That way, as you plow the inside of both tires sits snugly against the furrow wall.  

 

The first year I plowed the rear tires were turned "inward" so the outside edges of the tires matched.  I kept trying to put the front tire snug against the furrow, ended up fighting the tractor since the rear tires were snug against the furrow before the front could get there.


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#12 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 05:35 PM

My two cents would be to see if your tires track straight front and back.  The inside of your front tire should line up with the inside of the rear tire.   That way, as you plow the inside of both tires sits snugly against the furrow wall.  

 

The first year I plowed the rear tires were turned "inward" so the outside edges of the tires matched.  I kept trying to put the front tire snug against the furrow, ended up fighting the tractor since the rear tires were snug against the furrow before the front could get there.

That was one thing I got lucky on with Alice. The rear wheels are even inside with the inside of the fronts. The FF is a pain to plow with as they do not align.

 

Sometime soon between now and May 5, I need to set up Alice with both the 10" & 12" plows. Our next show in Pawnee, that weekend in May, we may get to plow this year and I want to be ready! I may put the 3-point to sleeve adapter on and set the 10" sleeve hitch plow!


Edited by KennyP, April 13, 2017 - 05:41 PM.

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#13 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2017 - 06:00 PM

Glad we have knowledgeable people hear to correct my misconceptions. I begin to understand now. thank you Don


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#14 Dan O OFFLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2017 - 07:27 PM

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Thanks for all the responses.

 

You will also want to flip the hitch upside down to where it is now. These plows were made to work with a wide variety of different brands of tractors and different brands are different widths across the back tires.

 

Jim

 

I flipped the hitch bracket and mounted it in the middle hole. Thanks for that, I wouldn't have gotten that right without your help. I'm just going to start with it in the slanted position and see how it goes.

 

I had to make a hitch pin, I didn't come with one, had just a bolt in there before. Welded a washer to a steel rod and then heated it and bent it. Odd size, bigger than 5/8", smaller than 3/4", 11/16"? I also replaced a couple of pieces of the cross chain that had broken on the tire chains, (snow plowing on pavement is hard on the tire chains.) Then I threw a couple of bungee cords on the tire chains to keep them in place.

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My two cents would be to see if your tires track straight front and back.  The inside of your front tire should line up with the inside of the rear tire.   That way, as you plow the inside of both tires sits snugly against the furrow wall. 

 

I checked the tires, the insides don't quite line up. The front inside sidewalls are about an inch further out than sidewalls on the rears, when measuring from a board held against the sidewalls. They are 2ish inches in from the outsides, and I don't see any way to change that. Flipping the fronts doesn't make a difference, and the rears are the facing the correct way, so short of making some sort of spacer, there is not much I can do about it. Hopefully it's close enough.

 

Per old cowhands instructions I put it up on blocks and got it adjusted.

I think I'm ready to go, just hope that it's dry enough.

 

 

 

 


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#15 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2017 - 07:56 PM

If you have an extra 25# or so to put on the left wheel, you'll thank yourself
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